Texas Natural Meats Recalls Beef Products Due To Possible Specified Risk Materials Contamination

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flounder
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Texas Natural Meats Recalls Beef Products Due To Possible Specified Risk Materials Contamination

Postby flounder » Thu Nov 16, 2017 10:39 am

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Texas Natural Meats Recalls Beef Products Due To Possible Specified Risk Materials Contamination

http://specifiedriskmaterial.blogspot.c ... -beef.html


kind regards, terry
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1982vett
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Re: Texas Natural Meats Recalls Beef Products Due To Possible Specified Risk Materials Contamination

Postby 1982vett » Thu Nov 16, 2017 2:11 pm

Oh so timely and efficient......recall April 2016 to November 11 2017 product but publish a November 15 2017 label......? Really!

What’s the real story here?
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flounder
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Re: Texas Natural Meats Recalls Beef Products Due To Possible Specified Risk Materials Contamination

Postby flounder » Thu Nov 16, 2017 8:55 pm

News Release
Texas Natural Meats Recalls Beef Products Due To Possible Specified Risk Materials Contamination
Class II Recall122-2017
Health Risk: LowNov 15, 2017
Congressional and Public Affairs
Brett Filloon
(202) 720-9113
Press@fsis.usda.gov

WASHINGTON, Nov. 15, 2017 – Texas Natural Meats, a Lott, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 116 pounds of beef tongue products that may be contaminated with specified risk materials (SRMs), the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The raw intact beef tongue items were produced on various dates between April 1, 2016 and Nov. 11, 2017. The following products are subject to recall: [View Label (PDF Only)]

1.72-lb. cryovac packages of frozen “Beef Tongue”.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 34449” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to product owners and further distributed in Texas.

The problem was discovered on Nov. 15, 2017 by FSIS, while conducting inspection verification activities.
There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

Consumers and media with questions about the recall can contact C.W. Whorton, Plant Manager, at (254) 584-0115.
Consumers with food safety questions can "Ask Karen," the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

USDA Recall Classifications

Class I This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.

Class II This is a health hazard situation where there is a remote probability of adverse health consequences from the use of the product.

Class III This is a situation where the use of the product will not cause adverse health consequences.

https://origin-www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/po ... 17-release


Specified Risk Material (SRM) Control

11/29/2016

Inspection Methods 29-1

Specified Risk Material (SRM) Control

Objectives

After completing this section of the training, participants will be able to:

1. Identify Specified Risk Materials (SRMs)

2. State the purpose of the SRM Control Verification task and how to perform it

3. Identify the actions IPP are to take when SRM noncompliance is found while
performing the SRM Control Verification task

References

1. Final Rule, Prohibition of the Use of Specified Risk Materials for Human Food
and Requirements for the Disposition of Non-Ambulatory Disabled Cattle;
Prohibition of the Use of Certain Stunning Devices Used to Immobilize Cattle
During Slaughter (Docket No. 03–025F; Federal Register Volume 72)

2. 9 CFR 310.22

3. FSIS Directive 6100.4, Verification Instructions Related to Specified Risk
Materials

4. FSIS PHIS Directive 5000.1,Verifying an Establishment's Food Safety System

5. FSIS Notice 69-12, Regulations Verified for Specified Risk Material

Noncompliance Records, Dated 12/14/12

6. FSIS Notice 26-16, Specified Risk Material (SRM) Control Verification Task,
Dated 04/26/16

7. FSIS website http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsi ... k-material
Background

Specified risk materials (SRMs) are tissues in cattle that are considered to be of
high risk for prion contamination. Prions are thought to be the cause of a group of
diseases called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) which are
diseases of the brain. Mad cow disease or bovine spongiform encephalopathy
(BSE) is the brain disease that affects cattle. The human variant of TSE is known
as Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (vCJD).

The removal of SRMs from all cattle presented for slaughter in accordance with 9
CFR 310.22 is the most important safeguard the United States has against BSE.
Establishments that slaughter cattle or process carcasses or parts of cattle must
identify, remove, and segregate SRMs from edible materials, and dispose them
Specified Risk Material (SRM) Control

11/29/2016

Inspection Methods 29-2

in accordance with Part 314. SRMs are inedible and cannot be used for human
food (9 CFR 310.22 (b)). All SRMs are prohibited from being used in edible
rendering (9 CFR 318.6 (b) (4)). However, SRMs may be used in inedible
rendering unless the animal is being tested for BSE.

Note: FDA requires removal of brain and spinal cord SRM from rendered
products intended for animal food. To comply with the FDA feed ban final rule,
establishments may take additional steps to remove SRM (brain and spinal cord
of cattle 30 months and older) to ensure meat and bone meal derived from such
rendered product may be used in the manufacture of animal feed. FSIS has no
jurisdiction over animal feed and does not verify this requirement.

Specified Risk Materials

SRMs are found in cattle of all ages. The age of cattle determines which SRMs
require segregation, removal and disposal. Tonsils and the distal ileum of the
small intestine are SRMs from cattle of any age. Several tissues are SRMs only
in cattle 30 months of age and older (OTM+). For cattle 30 months of age or
older, additional SRMs are the skull, brain, trigeminal ganglia (nerves attached to
the brain), eyes, spinal cord, vertebral column (excluding the vertebrae of the
tail, the transverse processes of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae, and the
wings of the sacrum), and dorsal root ganglia (nerves attached to the spinal
cord).

As indicated previously, tonsils are SRMs, inedible, and not for use in human
food. All visible tonsils must be removed under both 9 CFR 310.22(c) and 9 CFR
318.6(b). Beef market heads eligible for the mark of inspection require removal of
all identifiable tonsil SRM tissue (i.e., lingual, palatine, and pharyngeal tonsils).
Lingual tonsils are located under the skin at the base of the tongue, just behind
the last vallate papilla. The vallate papillae are large, circular structures on each
side near the back of the tongue. Palatine tonsils are located adjacent to soft
palate below the mucosal surface and the opening of sinus of palatine tonsil.
The distal ileum of the small intestine is also designated as an SRM. The distal
ileum is defined as 80 inches of uncoiled and trimmed small intestine, measuring
from the ceco-colic junction, proximally towards the jejunum. The ceco-colic
junction is the anatomic point at which the cecum and the colon join. If conditions
for documentation or removal are not met, the entire small intestine becomes
inedible.

Beef small intestines, excluding the distal ileum, can be used for human food or
in the manufacture of beef natural casings (9 CFR 318.6(b)(8)). Beef small
intestines can be used in meat food products and edible rendering (9 CFR 318.6
(b)(1)) provided that the establishment can show that the small intestines comply
with 9 CFR 310.22(d).

Specified Risk Material (SRM) Control

11/29/2016

Inspection Methods 29-3

The dorsal root ganglia represent the junction of spinal and peripheral nerves
and are located close to the intervertebral foramina anterior and just ventral to
the transverse process of the caudal vertebra. Traditional T-bone or porterhouse
steaks and bone-in rib roasts may be derived from domestic cattle less than 30
months of age. A portion of the vertebral column bone defining these cuts of
meat from cattle 30 months and older must be removed, resulting in a semiboneless
cut of meat. As long as the cut made by the saw is perpendicular to the
blade of the transverse process and far enough out on the transverse processes
that neither the dorsal or ventral parts of the articular processes of the vertebrae
are transected, the ends of the transverse processes will be oval, there will be no
other bone in the roast portion of the product, and the dorsal root ganglia will be
removed with the waste bone portion.

The vertebral column and spinal cord of cattle 30 months of age and older are
considered to be SRM. 9 CFR 310.22(c) indicates that the spinal cord from
cattle 30 months of age and older must be removed at the establishment where
the animal was slaughtered. Prior to removal, any SRM (e.g., spinal cord found
outside the spinal canal) found outside its normal location and not promptly
removed is considered to be contamination and must be addressed by the
establishment’s SRM removal (sanitation) program. After carcass-splitting, it is
acceptable to remove visible spinal cord outside of the spinal canal with knife
trimming.

Since mechanical stunning of cattle 30 months of age or older may result in
contamination of head surfaces with SRM brain material, IPP are to verify
effectiveness of establishment procedures to remove SRMs prior to inspection.
Establishments’ Specified Risk Material Control Programs

snip...see full text;

https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/wcm/conne ... OD=AJPERES


kind regards, terry
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