Land clearing in KY

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bigbluegrass
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Re: Land clearing in KY

Postby bigbluegrass » Sat Jan 07, 2017 3:32 pm

Jabes0623 wrote:No cover crops. Limed & fertilized & then sowed a grass/legume mix mid fall. I found that time of year to be a really nice to work on this kind of project.

I did burn the big brush pile, before I sowed the grass seed if recall correctly. One heck of a fire; burnt big for 3 days & smoldered for well over a week.


Did you graze your new pasture this year?

I noticed on your picture taken after you planted grass, that you had a pile of stuff in the middle of the picture. Was that after you burned it? Did you need to go back and clean that up later?
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Re: Land clearing in KY

Postby Margonme » Sat Jan 07, 2017 3:37 pm

bigbluegrass wrote:
Margonme wrote:It was a long push but I windrowed along the drainages. Avoid blocking/obstructing the flow channel. It will force the water to cut new channels. I did that by error in a couple places and the result is a new channel that is unstable. I burned a couple piles but mostly windrowed and left it to rot. It rots fast in this climate.

You look good on the P and K. Good luck. You will like the results and so will your cattle.


I am guessing the trees have all rotted down now? Did you need to go back and dress the areas where the windrow was up again and seed them down? I know you sold the dozer, which is what I intend to do with the loader.


The windrows are about gone. They rot and disappear like an ice cube melts. The succession of plants keeps up with the rotting. So no need to seed.

I did well on the dozer. Sold it for $500 less than I bought it for. Bought it off Machinery Trader from a guy who is a car salesman in Mississippi. Talk about taking a chance! Oddly, everything he said was dead on. I still contact him about once a year. He is on my Facebook. I enjoyed that dozer more than any machine I have ever owned. If I had a bad day, all I had to do was get in the seat and the world was fresh and interesting. If I were 10 years younger, I would buy another farm just to have an excuse to buy another dozer to clean it up.

:cboy:
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Re: Land clearing in KY

Postby bigbluegrass » Sat Jan 07, 2017 3:42 pm

Margonme wrote:The windrows are about gone. They rot and disappear like an ice cube melts. The succession of plants keeps up with the rotting. So no need to seed.

I did well on the dozer. Sold it for $500 less than I bought it for. Bought it off Machinery Trader from a guy who is a car salesman in Mississippi. Talk about taking a chance! Oddly, everything he said was dead on. I still contact him about once a year. He is on my Facebook. I enjoyed that dozer more than any machine I have ever owned. If I had a bad day, all I had to do was get in the seat and the world was fresh and interesting. If I were 10 years younger, I would buy another farm just to have an excuse to buy another dozer to clean it up.

:cboy:


Under the windrows, did grass come up or was it more trees or saplings?

It almost sounds like you want to come over here and run my loader and clear some land :) If it is that therapeutic for you, who I am to deny you :cboy:
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Re: Land clearing in KY

Postby Margonme » Sat Jan 07, 2017 3:44 pm

bigbluegrass wrote:
Margonme wrote:The windrows are about gone. They rot and disappear like an ice cube melts. The succession of plants keeps up with the rotting. So no need to seed.

I did well on the dozer. Sold it for $500 less than I bought it for. Bought it off Machinery Trader from a guy who is a car salesman in Mississippi. Talk about taking a chance! Oddly, everything he said was dead on. I still contact him about once a year. He is on my Facebook. I enjoyed that dozer more than any machine I have ever owned. If I had a bad day, all I had to do was get in the seat and the world was fresh and interesting. If I were 10 years younger, I would buy another farm just to have an excuse to buy another dozer to clean it up.

:cboy:


Under the windrows, did grass come up or was it more trees or saplings?

It almost sounds like you want to come over here and run my loader and clear some land :) If it is that therapeutic for you, who I am to deny you :cboy:


LOL. Does your track loader have Joysticks?

Grass mostly. Except in black locust areas. Those things come up in bunches. Need to get on them and keep them mowed.
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Re: Land clearing in KY

Postby bigbluegrass » Sat Jan 07, 2017 4:01 pm

Margonme wrote:
bigbluegrass wrote:
Margonme wrote:The windrows are about gone. They rot and disappear like an ice cube melts. The succession of plants keeps up with the rotting. So no need to seed.

I did well on the dozer. Sold it for $500 less than I bought it for. Bought it off Machinery Trader from a guy who is a car salesman in Mississippi. Talk about taking a chance! Oddly, everything he said was dead on. I still contact him about once a year. He is on my Facebook. I enjoyed that dozer more than any machine I have ever owned. If I had a bad day, all I had to do was get in the seat and the world was fresh and interesting. If I were 10 years younger, I would buy another farm just to have an excuse to buy another dozer to clean it up.

:cboy:


Under the windrows, did grass come up or was it more trees or saplings?

It almost sounds like you want to come over here and run my loader and clear some land :) If it is that therapeutic for you, who I am to deny you :cboy:


LOL. Does your track loader have Joysticks?

Grass mostly. Except in black locust areas. Those things come up in bunches. Need to get on them and keep them mowed.


Haha yes it has joysticks! It has 4 levers. The front two have positions of high neutral and low for left track and right tract, the two levers closest to the operator have positions forward neutral and reverse for each track. There is a 5th lever for hi-lo. I find it tricky to operate on the hills. When you put it in neutral it is supposed to gradually slow that track down, but on a hill it rapidly increases in speed, causing you to rotate the opposite direction you thought.

I am surprised grass came up. I thought it would mostly be saplings.

You must not have gotten much dirt in the piles or I would think you would need to go back and clean them up later. I had a friend clear a small area. As those trees rot down there is a 12"-24" berm of dirt that is showing up. I am sure some if from the rotten wood, but some is soil.
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Re: Land clearing in KY

Postby ddd75 » Sat Jan 07, 2017 6:08 pm

sounds like it uses a torque converter. i'd use the brakes to stop the machine before reversing on a steep hillside. or try to lightly roll it into a tree.

pretty hard on any dozer to reverse up / down those hills like that. i had a jd 450 w/ hydrastat and it did it pretty well ( i was clearing in lewis co) . i have a torque converter dozer now and i imagine you'd tear it up pretty good not relieving that pressure before reversing.

just my thinking :)
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Re: Land clearing in KY

Postby ddd75 » Sat Jan 07, 2017 6:11 pm

oh and the only way I found to get a good stand of grass on those hillsides was to spread seed.. and then unroll bales on top of it down the hillsides. then I'd just walk through and throw the hay all over.

not very fast but when your dealing with steep hillsides doing things by hand is about the only option.

your going to have briars taking over pretty quickly even with a good grass stand. I had 500 acres in hillsides and ridges and it was a massive amount of work to keep the hillsides clear. weedeating 100 acres of hillsides that you cant even ride a quad on isn't very fun. they are woods for a reason :)

Best thing is to get some goats to help keep that stuff under control but you'll have to have guard animals to keep the coy dogs away.
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Re: Land clearing in KY

Postby Margonme » Sat Jan 07, 2017 7:44 pm

bigbluegrass wrote:
Haha yes it has joysticks! It has 4 levers. The front two have positions of high neutral and low for left track and right tract, the two levers closest to the operator have positions forward neutral and reverse for each track. There is a 5th lever for hi-lo. I find it tricky to operate on the hills. When you put it in neutral it is supposed to gradually slow that track down, but on a hill it rapidly increases in speed, causing you to rotate the opposite direction you thought.

I am surprised grass came up. I thought it would mostly be saplings.

You must not have gotten much dirt in the piles or I would think you would need to go back and clean them up later. I had a friend clear a small area. As those trees rot down there is a 12"-24" berm of dirt that is showing up. I am sure some if from the rotten wood, but some is soil.


Mine was hydrostatic. Direction joystick on the left with acceleration button. Blade joystick on the right. Very precise. D3G is a high technology machine. You can become amazingly precise with those controls. I believe I could roll a chicken egg with out breaking it. The directional joystick could reverse direction in a millisecond. I decelerated before reversing direction.

There is no dirt in my windrows. I rolled the trees I pushed out to break off all the root ball. It was my dozer and I was working for myself so I had that luxury.

ddd75: if you prepare a seedbed, put down your seed properly and track it in, you can achieve good germination and a rapid stand of grass. I have some steep hillsides and never had any failures. I did not use any form of mulch.
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Re: Land clearing in KY

Postby bigbluegrass » Sat Jan 07, 2017 8:03 pm

ddd75 wrote:sounds like it uses a torque converter. i'd use the brakes to stop the machine before reversing on a steep hillside. or try to lightly roll it into a tree.

pretty hard on any dozer to reverse up / down those hills like that. i had a jd 450 w/ hydrastat and it did it pretty well ( i was clearing in lewis co) . i have a torque converter dozer now and i imagine you'd tear it up pretty good not relieving that pressure before reversing.

just my thinking :)


I believe you are correct, it uses a torque converter. How do you normally relieve the pressure on the torque converter? This is my first time running a machine like this. I sure don't want to damage anything. What I was doing was to get lined up with the trees I wanted to push down and try to head straight down the hill into them, push the trees down the hill, after pushing some I would slow the throttle and put the f-n-r shifters in neutral and then in reverse. Then increase the throttle until it started moving backward, line up with another tree while backing up the hill - using the h-n-l levers, then decrease the throttle and shift the f-n-r back to f and the h-n-l into l and head back down the hill at the targeted tree. It does seem to pop some if it is shifted quickly with the f-n-r or the h-n-l levers, but not always. The brakes do work and I use the manual brake to stop when going downhill. I haven't used the power brakes much, because they put the transmission in neutral before applying the brake and the couple times I tried them it took off down the hill on me. I believe this machine has two transmissions, one for each track. I would think it has two torque converters also? Maybe? Any tips on running something like this would be appreciated. I am about as green as they come! :mrgreen: Thanks!

My son would love to get goats, I just need to put up better fence before we get into that. I have those multiflora roses all over. They are awful. Spraying them seems to be the best way to keep up with them now.
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Re: Land clearing in KY

Postby ddd75 » Sat Jan 07, 2017 8:29 pm

bigbluegrass wrote:
ddd75 wrote:sounds like it uses a torque converter. i'd use the brakes to stop the machine before reversing on a steep hillside. or try to lightly roll it into a tree.

pretty hard on any dozer to reverse up / down those hills like that. i had a jd 450 w/ hydrastat and it did it pretty well ( i was clearing in lewis co) . i have a torque converter dozer now and i imagine you'd tear it up pretty good not relieving that pressure before reversing.

just my thinking :)


I believe you are correct, it uses a torque converter. How do you normally relieve the pressure on the torque converter? This is my first time running a machine like this. I sure don't want to damage anything. What I was doing was to get lined up with the trees I wanted to push down and try to head straight down the hill into them, push the trees down the hill, after pushing some I would slow the throttle and put the f-n-r shifters in neutral and then in reverse. Then increase the throttle until it started moving backward, line up with another tree while backing up the hill - using the h-n-l levers, then decrease the throttle and shift the f-n-r back to f and the h-n-l into l and head back down the hill at the targeted tree. It does seem to pop some if it is shifted quickly with the f-n-r or the h-n-l levers, but not always. The brakes do work and I use the manual brake to stop when going downhill. I haven't used the power brakes much, because they put the transmission in neutral before applying the brake and the couple times I tried them it took off down the hill on me. I believe this machine has two transmissions, one for each track. I would think it has two torque converters also? Maybe? Any tips on running something like this would be appreciated. I am about as green as they come! :mrgreen: Thanks!

My son would love to get goats, I just need to put up better fence before we get into that. I have those multiflora roses all over. They are awful. Spraying them seems to be the best way to keep up with them now.



sounds like you're doing it right.. best thing is just try to throttle down all the way before you shift but on a hillside you'll still have pressure. you'll need to push up against something (tree, brush pile) and take the load off..

watch out for acorn poisoning on the cattle if you have a lot of oaks.
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Re: Land clearing in KY

Postby ddd75 » Sat Jan 07, 2017 8:32 pm

Margonme wrote:
bigbluegrass wrote:
Haha yes it has joysticks! It has 4 levers. The front two have positions of high neutral and low for left track and right tract, the two levers closest to the operator have positions forward neutral and reverse for each track. There is a 5th lever for hi-lo. I find it tricky to operate on the hills. When you put it in neutral it is supposed to gradually slow that track down, but on a hill it rapidly increases in speed, causing you to rotate the opposite direction you thought.

I am surprised grass came up. I thought it would mostly be saplings.

You must not have gotten much dirt in the piles or I would think you would need to go back and clean them up later. I had a friend clear a small area. As those trees rot down there is a 12"-24" berm of dirt that is showing up. I am sure some if from the rotten wood, but some is soil.


Mine was hydrostatic. Direction joystick on the left with acceleration button. Blade joystick on the right. Very precise. D3G is a high technology machine. You can become amazingly precise with those controls. I believe I could roll a chicken egg with out breaking it. The directional joystick could reverse direction in a millisecond. I decelerated before reversing direction.

There is no dirt in my windrows. I rolled the trees I pushed out to break off all the root ball. It was my dozer and I was working for myself so I had that luxury.

ddd75: if you prepare a seedbed, put down your seed properly and track it in, you can achieve good germination and a rapid stand of grass. I have some steep hillsides and never had any failures. I did not use any form of mulch.




with the high erosion rate of that land i wouldn't leave any uncovered. I'm sure you know what 1 good rain storm would do to a open hill side. the hay would be a very small expense compared to the soil that will leave that land. There's only about a 1/4 - 1" of top soil covering that and it'll leave in a hurry.
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Re: Land clearing in KY

Postby Jabes0623 » Sat Jan 07, 2017 9:45 pm

bigbluegrass wrote:Did you graze your new pasture this year?

I noticed on your picture taken after you planted grass, that you had a pile of stuff in the middle of the picture. Was that after you burned it? Did you need to go back and clean that up later?


No we didn't graze it, just let it grow all year. Matter of fact I just brush hogged it off the 1st time a few weeks ago.

Yes there's still some tops & stumps that didn't burn but mostly what's left is piles of dirt from the dozer & boulders. I doubt that will ever get cleaned up probably just let a tree line grow up there. What the pics don't show is how steep that little area is, nearly a straight drop from the field into the ditch we pushed all the tops, stumps & boulders into. Way too steep to brushog & keep cleared off so no point cleaning it all up.
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Re: Land clearing in KY

Postby bigbluegrass » Mon Jan 09, 2017 6:30 pm

ddd75 wrote:
Margonme wrote:
bigbluegrass wrote:
Haha yes it has joysticks! It has 4 levers. The front two have positions of high neutral and low for left track and right tract, the two levers closest to the operator have positions forward neutral and reverse for each track. There is a 5th lever for hi-lo. I find it tricky to operate on the hills. When you put it in neutral it is supposed to gradually slow that track down, but on a hill it rapidly increases in speed, causing you to rotate the opposite direction you thought.

I am surprised grass came up. I thought it would mostly be saplings.

You must not have gotten much dirt in the piles or I would think you would need to go back and clean them up later. I had a friend clear a small area. As those trees rot down there is a 12"-24" berm of dirt that is showing up. I am sure some if from the rotten wood, but some is soil.


Mine was hydrostatic. Direction joystick on the left with acceleration button. Blade joystick on the right. Very precise. D3G is a high technology machine. You can become amazingly precise with those controls. I believe I could roll a chicken egg with out breaking it. The directional joystick could reverse direction in a millisecond. I decelerated before reversing direction.

There is no dirt in my windrows. I rolled the trees I pushed out to break off all the root ball. It was my dozer and I was working for myself so I had that luxury.

ddd75: if you prepare a seedbed, put down your seed properly and track it in, you can achieve good germination and a rapid stand of grass. I have some steep hillsides and never had any failures. I did not use any form of mulch.




with the high erosion rate of that land i wouldn't leave any uncovered. I'm sure you know what 1 good rain storm would do to a open hill side. the hay would be a very small expense compared to the soil that will leave that land. There's only about a 1/4 - 1" of top soil covering that and it'll leave in a hurry.


I have found the same thing here - very little top soil. I doubt I have 1" any place that is wooded. The 1/4" is more typical. The cedar areas seem particularly low in top soil. My soil test doesn't show organic matter, but I suspect it is very low. I would like to start testing for organic matter. I thought a cover crop would be a good idea to hold the soil, suppress weeds and build some organic matter. I figured I could roll it down with the loader or graze it, depending on the needs. It sounds like Margonme had good success leaving the ground bare for awhile. Margonme, did you have any hard rains when your ground was bare? Did your pasture wash bad?
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Re: Land clearing in KY

Postby bigbluegrass » Mon Jan 09, 2017 6:40 pm

Jabes0623 wrote:
bigbluegrass wrote:Did you graze your new pasture this year?

I noticed on your picture taken after you planted grass, that you had a pile of stuff in the middle of the picture. Was that after you burned it? Did you need to go back and clean that up later?


No we didn't graze it, just let it grow all year. Matter of fact I just brush hogged it off the 1st time a few weeks ago.

Yes there's still some tops & stumps that didn't burn but mostly what's left is piles of dirt from the dozer & boulders. I doubt that will ever get cleaned up probably just let a tree line grow up there. What the pics don't show is how steep that little area is, nearly a straight drop from the field into the ditch we pushed all the tops, stumps & boulders into. Way too steep to brushog & keep cleared off so no point cleaning it all up.


It sounds like you are pretty happy with how yours turned out. I know yours was only open for a few months in the fall, but did you get any heavy rains on it before you got the grass planted? Any concerns with erosion while it is bare ground?

What I am clearing is steep enough that I don't plan to mow it. Some of it I may be able to mow, but I don't plan on mowing. I use rotation grazing now with daily moves and plan to expand that. I could probably work around piles of rocks, stumps and boulders if I had to, but right now I am thinking I would like to keep that all cleaned up as I go. Maybe clear for a few days and burn for a few days. Then I could clean up what doesn't burn before planting and moving on.
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Re: Land clearing in KY

Postby Margonme » Mon Jan 09, 2017 7:03 pm

bigbluegrass wrote:
ddd75 wrote:
Margonme wrote:
Mine was hydrostatic. Direction joystick on the left with acceleration button. Blade joystick on the right. Very precise. D3G is a high technology machine. You can become amazingly precise with those controls. I believe I could roll a chicken egg with out breaking it. The directional joystick could reverse direction in a millisecond. I decelerated before reversing direction.

There is no dirt in my windrows. I rolled the trees I pushed out to break off all the root ball. It was my dozer and I was working for myself so I had that luxury.

ddd75: if you prepare a seedbed, put down your seed properly and track it in, you can achieve good germination and a rapid stand of grass. I have some steep hillsides and never had any failures. I did not use any form of mulch.




with the high erosion rate of that land i wouldn't leave any uncovered. I'm sure you know what 1 good rain storm would do to a open hill side. the hay would be a very small expense compared to the soil that will leave that land. There's only about a 1/4 - 1" of top soil covering that and it'll leave in a hurry.


I have found the same thing here - very little top soil. I doubt I have 1" any place that is wooded. The 1/4" is more typical. The cedar areas seem particularly low in top soil. My soil test doesn't show organic matter, but I suspect it is very low. I would like to start testing for organic matter. I thought a cover crop would be a good idea to hold the soil, suppress weeds and build some organic matter. I figured I could roll it down with the loader or graze it, depending on the needs. It sounds like Margonme had good success leaving the ground bare for awhile. Margonme, did you have any hard rains when your ground was bare? Did your pasture wash bad?


Shawn, I was very lucky. I did get some heavy rains but it occurred when the clearEd areas were rough. Thus, the soil eroded was trapped on site. I did not get any washing rains on the graded and seeded phase. I admit I had some good luck. I did not get any bad washing.
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