Soil Samples

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kenny thomas
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Re: Soil Samples

Postby kenny thomas » Tue Sep 19, 2017 7:39 pm

One thing I have noticed here is those that don't understand the soil test are the ones against it the most. I done some for a friend and it showed the soil very high in K. So much so that it was hurting the production. He had also limed it so much that the PH was 7.4. He said, we'll that can't be right and added 12-24-24 because he said too much N was hurting the soil. I just leave him alone.
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Re: Soil Samples

Postby littletom » Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:32 pm

herofan wrote:It appears that most here have a positive view of soil samples. I wonder why the people in my area dont experience positive results?

Close minded have to do things same way grandpa did 40 years ago. Ok with good enough instead of as good as possible and most net per acre.
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Re: Soil Samples

Postby Cucumber35 » Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:48 pm

How many of them 'actually' followed the soil test results? Completely. I'm betting not many. I will admit to not following them 100%. But I don't just throw out whatever I feel like either. I know the soil needs nutrients, that's obviously how things grow. But I don't find it affordable or practical to put down exactly what the soil test calls for all the time. I mostly use it to tell me what I DON'T need. If my P is below optimum but my K is WAY low, I'm gonna concentrate on correcting what is needed most. If I need lime, I'm not going to waste money on N. Soil tests are like most other things, a great tool in the box if used correctly. Not the Bible for your soil. I don't understand why you would not at least do one, they are ridiculously cheap and easy compared to the cost of fertilizer. There are plenty of people who can't justify the cost of fertilizing to soil test recommendations. But if you're going to make an investment, why not remove the blindfold and put it where you get the best returns? Throwing out 'Triple 19' every year and saying it works better sounds like an excuse for being lazy.
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Re: Soil Samples

Postby littletom » Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:59 pm

snoopdog wrote:We soil test , not doing so is a waste of money imo. I make it a point, to do what "the neighbors " tell me I can't . Most people that sit at the dead pecker tables in the coffee shops are F.O.S., Not all , but most .

I have a friend that is a very successful BTO. When he makes a big move if they don't doubt him and say he will go broke, it concerns him. If they think its a good idea he is convinced no way in hill it will work.
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Re: Soil Samples

Postby ddd75 » Wed Sep 20, 2017 6:28 am

Cucumber35 wrote:How many of them 'actually' followed the soil test results? Completely. I'm betting not many. I will admit to not following them 100%. But I don't just throw out whatever I feel like either. I know the soil needs nutrients, that's obviously how things grow. But I don't find it affordable or practical to put down exactly what the soil test calls for all the time. I mostly use it to tell me what I DON'T need. If my P is below optimum but my K is WAY low, I'm gonna concentrate on correcting what is needed most. If I need lime, I'm not going to waste money on N. Soil tests are like most other things, a great tool in the box if used correctly. Not the Bible for your soil. I don't understand why you would not at least do one, they are ridiculously cheap and easy compared to the cost of fertilizer. There are plenty of people who can't justify the cost of fertilizing to soil test recommendations. But if you're going to make an investment, why not remove the blindfold and put it where you get the best returns? Throwing out 'Triple 19' every year and saying it works better sounds like an excuse for being lazy.



be nice if we all put down what they say too we'd all be broke!
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Re: Soil Samples

Postby 1982vett » Wed Sep 20, 2017 7:43 am

ddd75 wrote:
Cucumber35 wrote:How many of them 'actually' followed the soil test results? Completely. I'm betting not many. I will admit to not following them 100%. But I don't just throw out whatever I feel like either. I know the soil needs nutrients, that's obviously how things grow. But I don't find it affordable or practical to put down exactly what the soil test calls for all the time. I mostly use it to tell me what I DON'T need. If my P is below optimum but my K is WAY low, I'm gonna concentrate on correcting what is needed most. If I need lime, I'm not going to waste money on N. Soil tests are like most other things, a great tool in the box if used correctly. Not the Bible for your soil. I don't understand why you would not at least do one, they are ridiculously cheap and easy compared to the cost of fertilizer. There are plenty of people who can't justify the cost of fertilizing to soil test recommendations. But if you're going to make an investment, why not remove the blindfold and put it where you get the best returns? Throwing out 'Triple 19' every year and saying it works better sounds like an excuse for being lazy.



be nice if we all put down what they say too we'd all be broke!

Tis the reason you sometimes throw the book out the window......
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Re: Soil Samples

Postby Texasmark » Wed Sep 20, 2017 4:16 pm

wbvs58 wrote:

I do do the occaisional soil test to see how things are going, mostly where I'm growing annual forages but at $150 a hit I do it sparingly.

I feel that it is very hard to get a good representative sample of soil from a paddock. Even taking sample from several different spots and mixing it together is not good as it only gives an average and some areas probably require a lot different treatment to others. Also some areas may have had a heavy dose of fertiliser land there last time it was spread and the effects linger on thereby not being a true representation of the paddock. This may explain why some people are distrusting of soil tests.

Ken


I don't think TAMU (Texas A&M University) Soil Extension Service cares where the sample originates...aka US or wherever. As I said, the forms are online. Take your sample and package per their directions ........dry it out so as not to mildew, place in a zip lock bag, label for ID purposes with your personal info and where it came from on your farm...for your benefit if more than one sample is submitted. Price per bag is $10.

You include your email address and in the forms you download and send with the sample, indicate what you plan to produce (crop and volume) with the soil that's being sampled. They send you an electronic answer via your email and tell you how much of what you have and how much of what you need to do what you want. Depending on the season, you can have an answer in a few days plus shipping time from you to them.
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Re: Soil Samples

Postby Stocker Steve » Wed Sep 20, 2017 7:20 pm

snoopdog wrote:Most people that sit at the dead pecker tables in the coffee shops are F.O.S.


How do you know if you are seated at a dead pecker table? :?
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Re: Soil Samples

Postby wbvs58 » Wed Sep 20, 2017 7:25 pm

Texasmark wrote:
wbvs58 wrote:

I do do the occaisional soil test to see how things are going, mostly where I'm growing annual forages but at $150 a hit I do it sparingly.

I feel that it is very hard to get a good representative sample of soil from a paddock. Even taking sample from several different spots and mixing it together is not good as it only gives an average and some areas probably require a lot different treatment to others. Also some areas may have had a heavy dose of fertiliser land there last time it was spread and the effects linger on thereby not being a true representation of the paddock. This may explain why some people are distrusting of soil tests.

Ken


I don't think TAMU (Texas A&M University) Soil Extension Service cares where the sample originates...aka US or wherever. As I said, the forms are online. Take your sample and package per their directions ........dry it out so as not to mildew, place in a zip lock bag, label for ID purposes with your personal info and where it came from on your farm...for your benefit if more than one sample is submitted. Price per bag is $10.

You include your email address and in the forms you download and send with the sample, indicate what you plan to produce (crop and volume) with the soil that's being sampled. They send you an electronic answer via your email and tell you how much of what you have and how much of what you need to do what you want. Depending on the season, you can have an answer in a few days plus shipping time from you to them.


Thanks for that but I don't think I'd be game to do that. I think I'd run into to much trouble with biosecurity sending soil from here to the US.

Ken
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Re: Soil Samples

Postby herofan » Wed Sep 20, 2017 9:59 pm

Stocker Steve wrote:
snoopdog wrote:Most people that sit at the dead pecker tables in the coffee shops are F.O.S.


How do you know if you are seated at a dead pecker table? :?


That's what I was wondering. If it's true that you can't take advice from guys with dead peckers, I don't know what to do, because I don't have that much inside information on any guys I know. Of course, he did say dead pecker "table." Maybe they have their tables labeled. :D
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Re: Soil Samples

Postby snoopdog » Thu Sep 21, 2017 5:29 am

herofan wrote:
Stocker Steve wrote:
snoopdog wrote:Most people that sit at the dead pecker tables in the coffee shops are F.O.S.


How do you know if you are seated at a dead pecker table? :?


That's what I was wondering. If it's true that you can't take advice from guys with dead peckers, I don't know what to do, because I don't have that much inside information on any guys I know. Of course, he did say dead pecker "table." Maybe they have their tables labeled. :D
Just ask the waitress , and tell her you want to drink a gallon of coffee for .75, she'll seat you appropriately .
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Re: Soil Samples

Postby Texasmark » Thu Sep 21, 2017 6:51 am

wbvs58 wrote:
Texasmark wrote:
wbvs58 wrote:

I do do the occaisional soil test to see how things are going, mostly where I'm growing annual forages but at $150 a hit I do it sparingly.

I feel that it is very hard to get a good representative sample of soil from a paddock. Even taking sample from several different spots and mixing it together is not good as it only gives an average and some areas probably require a lot different treatment to others. Also some areas may have had a heavy dose of fertiliser land there last time it was spread and the effects linger on thereby not being a true representation of the paddock. This may explain why some people are distrusting of soil tests.

Ken


I don't think TAMU (Texas A&M University) Soil Extension Service cares where the sample originates...aka US or wherever. As I said, the forms are online. Take your sample and package per their directions ........dry it out so as not to mildew, place in a zip lock bag, label for ID purposes with your personal info and where it came from on your farm...for your benefit if more than one sample is submitted. Price per bag is $10.

You include your email address and in the forms you download and send with the sample, indicate what you plan to produce (crop and volume) with the soil that's being sampled. They send you an electronic answer via your email and tell you how much of what you have and how much of what you need to do what you want. Depending on the season, you can have an answer in a few days plus shipping time from you to them.


Thanks for that but I don't think I'd be game to do that. I think I'd run into to much trouble with biosecurity sending soil from here to the US.

Ken


Good point! Oh well, I tried. Grin
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herofan
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Re: Soil Samples

Postby herofan » Thu Sep 21, 2017 4:50 pm

Well, my brother collected soil samples on our hay fields today, and it's free at the extension office. I'm not sure how long it will take, but the suspense is growing.
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Re: Soil Samples

Postby 1wlimo » Thu Sep 21, 2017 5:27 pm

herofan wrote:It appears that most here have a positive view of soil samples. I wonder why the people in my area dont experience positive results?


lots depends on how soil samples are done, and then if the recommendations are followed.

However if you look at work done by Gabe Brown and others like him, adding fertiliser is a waste of time. Much better to feed the soil naturally than with chemicals. Where we bale graze or stock pile the grass is much much better than fertilised land.

There is soil science to back this up. When you add nitrogen or any other nutrient in a pure chemical form to the soil it has to reach the plant in soil water that moves only very small distances. Natural sources in soil where there is a very good mycorrhizal population can travel over much larger distances. The soil is also much more resilient. A forest fire removes vast volumes of nutrients from the soil. In just two years healthy soil can be back to a good nutrient status with out the addition of any thing to the soil.
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Re: Soil Samples

Postby Stocker Steve » Fri Sep 22, 2017 10:08 am

1wlimo wrote:However if you look at work done by Gabe Brown and others like him, adding fertiliser is a waste of time. Much better to feed the soil naturally than with chemicals. Where we bale graze or stock pile the grass is much much better than fertilised land.


Gabe has naturally high ph.
Lots of dead dirt may require a kick start and/or a rebalance.
Bale grazing is best from there.
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