Pasture Aeration

Discuss grasses and how to grow and harvest them.
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1982vett
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Re: Pasture Aeration

Post by 1982vett » Tue Sep 25, 2018 8:56 am

I’ll take a half inch slow all day rainover a 2 inch flash in the pan rain any time. every rain we’ve gotten this year has been mostly a slow soaking rain. Average rainfall through the end of August was short 10 inches but being slow rains helped make up for less. Those cracks in the ground do help capture runoff. Grazing was starting to get short in places by the time relief showed up in September. Still haven’t caught runoff water but the grass is green and growing. Cracks in the ground and rain are just a part. Another part to pasture health is stocking rate. Short grass with short roots isnt going to produce short of rain no matter your fertility.

Yeah , you pivot and pipe toting guys curse a good rain at the wrong time don’t you. :D


Aug 7, 2019 22:51GMT -5 the illustrious potentate said:
Because you have the freedom to say what you think, doesn't always mean that you should.

The right to speak freely is not free of consequences.

Texasmark
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Re: Pasture Aeration

Post by Texasmark » Wed Sep 26, 2018 7:28 am

BRYANT wrote:I hunted a field that had the thickest and best looking Bermuda grass I ever saw and they told me, I did not see them when they did it, that they had ripped the field with a ripper behind a dozer every 4-5 foot and 4 foot deep a couple years before. It sure look like the rain soaked in rather than run of ???


On a popular farm site not too long ago I read where a farmer had a "bog" that was an unusable part of one of his fields. Said he broke the plow pan and the field hasn't held water since.

Seems to me that every year you work your soil to a known producing depth. Over the years the area below that surely becomes rigid and unable to percolate. Ripping through that from time to time has to be a good thing. Only question is, how deep is deep enough.

On pulling a 4' ripper yes it would take some traction. On the Hay King renovator, it takes about 10 hp per shank but as stated it only works down to about 12". Since my implements work the top 6" or less, that seems to be plenty deep.

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Re: Pasture Aeration

Post by Ebenezer » Wed Sep 26, 2018 2:54 pm

Just got back from a field day. Deeper soil disturbance is only as good as the roots that immediately occupy the cut after that and the benefits are gone. But there are some soils where an organic hardpan can be fractured for longer benefit but those soils are unique in that characteristic. UGA has found a good bit of legacy plow pan issues 2 to 4" below the surface of the soil. Mechanical aeration uses OM quickly to leave soils at a disadvantage. Allowing taller stop height on forages will increase rooting depth and take care of hard pan issues.

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Re: Pasture Aeration

Post by Texasmark » Thu Sep 27, 2018 8:59 am

Ebenezer wrote:Just got back from a field day. Deeper soil disturbance is only as good as the roots that immediately occupy the cut after that and the benefits are gone. But there are some soils where an organic hardpan can be fractured for longer benefit but those soils are unique in that characteristic. UGA has found a good bit of legacy plow pan issues 2 to 4" below the surface of the soil. Mechanical aeration uses OM quickly to leave soils at a disadvantage. Allowing taller stop height on forages will increase rooting depth and take care of hard pan issues.


To each his/her own. I'm not a professionally educated agronomist, soil expert, or such, just a guy trying to learn how to farm over the past 40 years. I live on Huston Black Clay and it has its uniqueness. I report on things that occur in my daily life, no speculation, no guessing what might happen, just what actually happens to me.

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