Overweight Mare

Horse management, health, feeding and grooming.
User avatar
Running Arrow Bill
GURU
GURU
Posts: 3439
Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 10:40 am
Location: Texas Panhandle On US 83
Contact:

Overweight Mare

Postby Running Arrow Bill » Wed Aug 24, 2005 1:15 pm

We have an 11 yr old Peruvian Paso mare who "somehow" got about 150 or so lbs overweight on green bermudagrass pasture and about 9-12" of bermudagrass hay per day. We gradually reduced her hay to about a 3" flake and then discontinued the hay, leaving her only on the green bermuda pasture.

She is essentially "inactive" with little exercise.

Question: What is your opinion on this "treatment?" Will the absence of a "little" hay create a risk of colic? Or, will she be ok. And, about how long will it take her to get back to normal weight.

Thanks!
0 x
RUNNING ARROW FARM, LLC
Registered Texas Longhorns & TWH's
Senior Sires, "TOTEM POLE" & "JBR CASH"
http://www.runningarrowlonghorns.com
longhorncattle2013@gmail.com

User avatar
J
Rancher
Rancher
Posts: 754
Joined: Mon Aug 01, 2005 4:33 pm
Location: central texas

Postby J » Wed Aug 24, 2005 2:06 pm

I have a 8 year old mare that only eats whats in the pasture. She too is overweight and gets feed or hay only in the winter time. It seems like she gains weight on just about anything including the air she breathes. I don't think there is a risk of colic but I also don't think this will bring her weight down although it probably varies from horse to horse.
I hope to start working my mare again soon to bring her weight down some.
0 x

User avatar
Running Arrow Bill
GURU
GURU
Posts: 3439
Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 10:40 am
Location: Texas Panhandle On US 83
Contact:

Postby Running Arrow Bill » Wed Aug 24, 2005 2:43 pm

J wrote:I have a 8 year old mare that only eats whats in the pasture. She too is overweight and gets feed or hay only in the winter time. It seems like she gains weight on just about anything including the air she breathes. I don't think there is a risk of colic but I also don't think this will bring her weight down although it probably varies from horse to horse.
I hope to start working my mare again soon to bring her weight down some.


Yes, my mare appears to be an "easy keeper". Have had her for 4 years and learn something every day.

She does appear to be developing a very slight limp in one leg; hardly noticeable. Our farrier last month said she needed to be cut back on food and watched closely for risk of founder.

Just didn't know the best way to get her "moving" more...hadn't ridden her hardly any this year. Do you think riding her around her paddock area some or "taking her for walks" on lead rope would help? Don't want to overdo anything at this point. My biggest problem in summer is that I'm not a morning person, frequently too hot to work/ride horse during day, and often too tired late in afternoon/early evening... My "Catch 22"...duh!
0 x
RUNNING ARROW FARM, LLC
Registered Texas Longhorns & TWH's
Senior Sires, "TOTEM POLE" & "JBR CASH"
http://www.runningarrowlonghorns.com
longhorncattle2013@gmail.com

User avatar
J
Rancher
Rancher
Posts: 754
Joined: Mon Aug 01, 2005 4:33 pm
Location: central texas

Postby J » Wed Aug 24, 2005 3:03 pm

Definitely exercise is the answer. Cutting her feed back will help some but she needs to get some exercise even if it's only for a walk. Since she is overweight be careful not to over do it because she will get hot faster than a fit horse.
0 x

User avatar
Scotty
GURU
GURU
Posts: 2023
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2004 12:56 pm
Location: West TX

Postby Scotty » Wed Aug 24, 2005 8:30 pm

I have had the same problem and the same treatment as you. My vet told me a horse will not exert enogh energy to loose any weight on good to decent pasture. Exercise is the only option i could come up with. My horses are Qrarters and paints.


Scotty
0 x
TSCRA Member
AAA Member

User avatar
Alan
GURU
GURU
Posts: 9481
Joined: Sun May 09, 2004 11:54 am
Location: NW Oregon

Postby Alan » Wed Aug 24, 2005 9:16 pm

Bill,

I would "wean" her off the grass slowly and put her somewhere that you control the diet. If she is on pasure 24 hrs a day, I would cut her back to 6 or 8 hrs for 4 or 5 days then back to 4 or 5 hrs for 4 or 5 days and so on. Also I would be very light or no exercise at first, because if she is foundering she will be quite sore and exercise may compound the problem. Don't ride until she is 100% not foundering. If you keep her in a stall or paddock give her small amounts of hay several times a day as you wean her off pasture. She's like anyone else, to loose weight you have to eat less. Watch her feet for heat and swelling and neck for crowning. If she is foundering she will be more likely to founder in the future so keep an eye on her. Hopefully she is just fat and sore from carrying too much weight.

Your farrier should have told you that they can put special shoes on her to ease the pressure off the feet. If she gets too lame get a vet out to xray the lame foot to make sure the coffin bone hasn't rotated or is in trouble.

A few years back we bought my wife a trail horse who was about 150 to 200 pounds over weight. It was comming towards winter so we put a blanket on her right away. The blanket was black, she stretched it so tight she looked like an olive coming down the isle. My wife doesn't like it but the name stuck. Her name is Desi but we call her Olive. :D

Good Luck,
Alan
0 x

User avatar
Running Arrow Bill
GURU
GURU
Posts: 3439
Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 10:40 am
Location: Texas Panhandle On US 83
Contact:

Postby Running Arrow Bill » Sat Aug 27, 2005 3:23 pm

Alan wrote:Bill,

I would "wean" her off the grass slowly and put her somewhere that you control the diet. If she is on pasure 24 hrs a day, I would cut her back to 6 or 8 hrs for 4 or 5 days then back to 4 or 5 hrs for 4 or 5 days and so on. Also I would be very light or no exercise at first, because if she is foundering she will be quite sore and exercise may compound the problem. Don't ride until she is 100% not foundering. If you keep her in a stall or paddock give her small amounts of hay several times a day as you wean her off pasture. She's like anyone else, to loose weight you have to eat less. Watch her feet for heat and swelling and neck for crowning. If she is foundering she will be more likely to founder in the future so keep an eye on her. Hopefully she is just fat and sore from carrying too much weight.

Your farrier should have told you that they can put special shoes on her to ease the pressure off the feet. If she gets too lame get a vet out to xray the lame foot to make sure the coffin bone hasn't rotated or is in trouble.

A few years back we bought my wife a trail horse who was about 150 to 200 pounds over weight. It was comming towards winter so we put a blanket on her right away. The blanket was black, she stretched it so tight she looked like an olive coming down the isle. My wife doesn't like it but the name stuck. Her name is Desi but we call her Olive. :D

Good Luck,
Alan


Thanks Alan!

We don't have any paddocks or pens that don't have grass. Only our TWH Stallion is on a dry lot with controlled feeding... My PP mare doesn't appear to be sore, or limping any now. No change in neck crest. We do have several horse pens: 50 x 75' and 80 x 90'. I suppose when one of those is eaten down by another horse I could put her in one of those pens for week or so. When I "weighed" her 2-3 weeks ago with a weight tape she was about 1,100 lbs--little heavy for a Peruvian Paso--their best weight range is between about 950 and 1050.
0 x
RUNNING ARROW FARM, LLC
Registered Texas Longhorns & TWH's
Senior Sires, "TOTEM POLE" & "JBR CASH"
http://www.runningarrowlonghorns.com
longhorncattle2013@gmail.com

User avatar
THECowGirl
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Aug 24, 2005 10:24 am
Location: Ohio
Contact:

Postby THECowGirl » Sun Aug 28, 2005 2:08 pm

Well, I have a suggestion.

What kind of temperment does she have? If shes extremely laid back and easy to handle, around here there are TONS of people who love horses but dont have the $$ or place to keep them. So what Im suggestion is you could kinda like lease her out to someone to ride her on a daily basis to get her moving a bit. :D
0 x

User avatar
JustACountryGirl
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2005 2:37 pm
Location: Central Florida
Contact:

Postby JustACountryGirl » Sun Aug 28, 2005 3:29 pm

If you do not have an area to control her feed, try getting a grazing muzzle. They look like a dog's muzzle. You put them on their muzzles during the day and remove it for a couple of hours at a time. This was she'll graze a couple of hours and not eat a couple then graze again. I think you can get one for about fity bucks, small price to pay compared to a founder vet bill.
0 x

User avatar
Running Arrow Bill
GURU
GURU
Posts: 3439
Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 10:40 am
Location: Texas Panhandle On US 83
Contact:

Postby Running Arrow Bill » Sun Aug 28, 2005 3:35 pm

THECowGirl wrote:Well, I have a suggestion.

What kind of temperment does she have? If shes extremely laid back and easy to handle, around here there are TONS of people who love horses but dont have the $$ or place to keep them. So what Im suggestion is you could kinda like lease her out to someone to ride her on a daily basis to get her moving a bit. :D


I suppose that would work. However, in our part of Texas if a horse is NOT a QH, then it is not of the equine species...lol.

In past I have contacted 4H, College equine programs, run ads in newspaper, put word out with folks we do business with, etc. No one is interested. I've even offered between $15 and $50 an hour to people (did have a couple of people that came for an hour or so and didn't ever come back). About only thing I haven't done is put an adv in 8-10 papers (within 50 mi radius of us). Our closest town of 3,500 people or so is 32 miles. Next closest town of about 10,000 is 60 miles. Next closest of 50,000+ is about 100-120 miles. You get the picture!

My mare is very laid back, easy to handle, grandkids have ridden her under supervision, responds well under saddle with light rein/cues, etc.

Again, in our area if a horse doesn't cut, rein, barrel, pole, work cattle, or race (yes a few Thorobred people around)...then, it is considered a useless pasture ornament!

:roll:
0 x
RUNNING ARROW FARM, LLC
Registered Texas Longhorns & TWH's
Senior Sires, "TOTEM POLE" & "JBR CASH"
http://www.runningarrowlonghorns.com
longhorncattle2013@gmail.com

User avatar
THECowGirl
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Aug 24, 2005 10:24 am
Location: Ohio
Contact:

Postby THECowGirl » Mon Aug 29, 2005 11:02 am

LOL I live in ohio, and agriculture and horses arent as big around here.

I would LOVE for it to be but it just isnt. If I was close Id ride her for ya!!
0 x

User avatar
Wilson_Cattle_Company
Rancher
Rancher
Posts: 504
Joined: Wed Mar 30, 2005 10:40 pm
Location: Manchester, Oklahoma, In a Saddle, ridin' rodeos, or passed out next to the keg :)
Contact:

Postby Wilson_Cattle_Company » Mon Oct 03, 2005 7:38 pm

I think she would be just fine.
0 x
Avery Wilson
Wilson Cattle Company
Manchester, Oklahoma

Angus.... The business breed!
AAA Member

User avatar
Running Arrow Bill
GURU
GURU
Posts: 3439
Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 10:40 am
Location: Texas Panhandle On US 83
Contact:

Postby Running Arrow Bill » Tue Oct 04, 2005 3:37 pm

She seems to be doing ok. Moved her into a 3.5 acre pasture with a TWH mare and TWH yearling filly. They move around a lot. The Peruvian is dominant female.

To the person that suggested "Leasing Her Out":

In our part of the country, she is not considered a "Horse" (since she is not a QH). Also, she is too valuable of an animal to let just anyone keep her... :) She has produced some Champion foals...
0 x
RUNNING ARROW FARM, LLC
Registered Texas Longhorns & TWH's
Senior Sires, "TOTEM POLE" & "JBR CASH"
http://www.runningarrowlonghorns.com
longhorncattle2013@gmail.com


Return to “Horse Care”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest