rearen up on ya.

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ONLY-BEEF
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rearen up on ya.

Postby ONLY-BEEF » Sun Apr 23, 2006 8:58 pm

A tip on stopen yur pony from rearen up on ya is to take and fill yur self a ballon with hot water from yur tap. put a glove on and hold that hot ballon in yur hand. get on that pony an when it rears up on ya break that ther ballon right between his ears real hard like. after ya done this a time or 2 he will get ta thinken that every time he rears up he splits his head on somthen and takes to bleeden. i stopped me a good number o ponys from rearen over the years just by doen this.
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Postby rc » Mon Apr 24, 2006 7:16 am

i can't help but reply to this and hope that any reading it will spend more time teaching thier horse forward motion and also getting them to disengage their hind quarters. Most of the time a horse rears is because the rider simply gives it no other direction to go. This is a fable I have heard all my life but never actually been on a ride with someone carrying a water ballon for that reason. I should know you when I see you I guess. Sorry, couldn't help myself...........
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Postby gabz » Mon Apr 24, 2006 4:19 pm

The water balloon can work sometimes, but the horse will find another way to act like an idiot.

what RC says is more practical. Keep that horse moving forward or in a circle. Same thing for bucking. If you stop, they think they won and they'll keep up the bad behavior.

If you aren't up to it. Pay a professional or sell the horse.
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Postby cowspider » Thu May 04, 2006 4:18 pm

I agree. when I was young I had an ole cowboy tell me he use to break a bottle of warm water over their head and it stopped bad behaveir. I could'nt do it.
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Postby jnowack » Tue May 23, 2006 11:01 am

I have a mare that I team pen and sort with and I had problems with her rearing up. An old trainer gave me some advice that helped me out a lot. The first thing he asked is what did I do when she came up. I was letting off the bit and just holding on. He said to keep pressure on the bit but not to yank on it, and to spur her and get her back feet moving. Then when she comes down and drops her head then release the pressure. He said that most horses that rear up and throw their head around do it because the rider released the pressure on the bit every time it happened, so they thought they did something right.
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Postby msscamp » Tue May 23, 2006 8:41 pm

jnowack wrote:He said to keep pressure on the bit but not to yank on it, and to spur her and get her back feet moving. Then when she comes down and drops her head then release the pressure.


That will work with some horses, but it will bring other horses right on over on top of you.
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Postby milkmaid » Tue May 23, 2006 9:23 pm

I know an old cowboy who said he cured quite a few horses of rearing by pulling them over backwards. Only when he was riding bareback or had his feet free of the stirrups! and he must have been pretty agile in his day. He told a story of someone he knew or worked for (I can't remember) that got kind of mad and rode off on a horse that was a known rearer. So the tale goes, horse and rider came back hours later, horse in a sweat and rider hung up by his boot. Drug to death. The conclusion everyone came to was that the horse had reared, fellow had tried that trick...and it was the last thing he ever did.
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Postby msscamp » Tue May 23, 2006 9:32 pm

milkmaid wrote:I know an old cowboy who said he cured quite a few horses of rearing by pulling them over backwards.


That is how Dad cured one of our mares of rearing. She threw a fit, reared and went over backwards with him. When she got up the off rein was across the saddle and he jerked her over backwards again. To the best of my knowledge she never reared again.
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Postby jnowack » Wed May 24, 2006 12:44 am

msscamp wrote:
jnowack wrote:He said to keep pressure on the bit but not to yank on it, and to spur her and get her back feet moving. Then when she comes down and drops her head then release the pressure.


That will work with some horses, but it will bring other horses right on over on top of you.


Thats the part he said you had to be careful about (the spurs), just enough to get them moving.
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Postby msscamp » Wed May 24, 2006 1:23 am

jnowack wrote:
msscamp wrote:
jnowack wrote:He said to keep pressure on the bit but not to yank on it, and to spur her and get her back feet moving. Then when she comes down and drops her head then release the pressure.


That will work with some horses, but it will bring other horses right on over on top of you.


Thats the part he said you had to be careful about (the spurs), just enough to get them moving.


I would caution you to be absolutely certain you know the horse - and the motivations for rearing - before applying this particular technique. Granted, it will work on a lot of horses, but I would sure hate to see you get hurt by applying it to one of those it won't work on. We never ride with spurs, just being goosed with boot heels was enough to make the mare mentioned above try to buck while rearing and go over. Just a little something to think about.
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Postby flaboy- » Wed May 24, 2006 7:26 am

Well I may very well be that old cowboy you are talking about. I "used" to break horses that went up on me by pulling them over but you are right, the timing is critical. I then went to starting them as yearlings. If they reared from pressure I would try to time it with a long enough lead rope to get around them and snatch them over. Say what you want but this technique has worked for me more times than not.

I now try to do MUCH more ground work on them when they are young as I am not! It seems to work better than brute force.
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Postby msscamp » Wed May 24, 2006 9:21 pm

flaboy- wrote:It seems to work better than brute force.


I agree with you flaboy, the horse I mentioned is the only horse we've ever had that reared and she only did it when she was throwing a temper fit. She was purchased at a production sale, spoiled, and had been allowed to get away with throwing fits for quite a while. I probably should have mentioned that the same day she went over with Dad, she had already thrown me and messed me up pretty bad. She is the only horse we've ever had that threw these kinds of fits, and the only one that was ever pulled over backwards.
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Postby Heritage_Farmboy » Sun May 28, 2006 7:05 pm

my step-father used to get a thick leather strap and when the horses would rear up...he'd smack their hind legs with it to get em kicking so they'd come down and try to run...only bad thing about that was they got used to running and he'd have to work with them to get em to slow down their pace

about pulling them over...when I was young...i'd get one a few horses that my dad hadn't broke yet and they'd rear up and i'd get scared and just hold on and pull on the reins and I never came close to pulling one of em over backwards...seems like it'd be a pretty hard tast to pull a horse over backwards just to break it from rearing...seems like it'd get right many of your horses hurt too...when horses rear up...they usually dont rear up so far that they'll get themselves off balance...they usually got more weight going forward than a person could just pull backwards and make the horse fall over
Last edited by Heritage_Farmboy on Sun Jun 18, 2006 1:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Alan » Mon May 29, 2006 1:19 pm

I with you guys on this, if a horse rears up the last thing I want to do is pull back on the bit. I won't have a horse that rears.. gone! But when I was younger I would give them their head, try to get my weight forward and wait for them to come down. When they came down I would take the head and circle the cr@p out of them, flexing work.

I'm with Flaboy I work them now while they are young, when the youngster rears I try to make it real uncomfortable for them, pulling and twisting them, If I do pull a young one over I pray they don't hit their head too hard, but it usally stops the rearing.

JMO,
Alan
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Postby Heritage_Farmboy » Mon May 29, 2006 2:20 pm

Alan wrote:I won't have a horse that rears.. gone!


if you know how to train horses...its a lot cheaper to get a wild horse and break it than to buy a horse thats already broken...and if you buy a wild horse...you can break it and train it exactly how you want to...sometimes you'll buy a horse thats been trained to run...so it always wants to go fast...sometimes they haven't been worked hard enough and they want to slack off...when you buy a wild horse...you start from the beginning with the horse...you can teach him to do everything you want him to do...you dont have to worry about what he learned before...when I was young my dad would go buy wild ponies from Chincoteague and they were great...it took a lot of hard work to break them...but once we got them broke we could teach them to our likin'...just about every wild horse will rear up and try to scare you off but when you dont run off they're thinking "im bigger than you...why aint you scared of me?"...once they realize you wont back down from them...they'll stop the rearing up because they know its not going to scare you off...I wont buy a horse thats already broke...if they buck and rear up then thats fine...just gives you more time to work with them and get used to their personality
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