rearen up on ya.

Horse management, health, feeding and grooming.
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Alan
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Postby Alan » Mon May 29, 2006 2:32 pm

My feeling it is part of my age, not a youngster anymore. John Lyons was giving a seminar a few miles away a couple of months ago, he horse reared and went over on him, broke his collar bone. Unbroke horses are a young mans/girls sport.

Alan
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Heritage_Farmboy

Postby Heritage_Farmboy » Mon May 29, 2006 2:56 pm

im 62 and I still break all my own horses...but maybe im just an old man thats thinks he's still young enough to get the job done :lol: ...it's not always a younguns sport...my father broke and trained horses until he was 73 then he had a stroke and was unable to move his left arm after that...broke his heart not being able to work with all them horses anymore...I believe a lot of us "old folks" can get the job done a lot better than some of the younguns still :D ...most of the younguns dont even want to have to train their horse...so you know they aint going to want to break them...but maybe its a smart thing for you to not get a horse that rears...I just aint been smart enough to figure out im too old for it yet :)

Have a good day Alan
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Postby hayray » Tue May 30, 2006 6:22 am

rc wrote:i can't help but reply to this and hope that any reading it will spend more time teaching thier horse forward motion and also getting them to disengage their hind quarters. Most of the time a horse rears is because the rider simply gives it no other direction to go. This is a fable I have heard all my life but never actually been on a ride with someone carrying a water ballon for that reason. I should know you when I see you I guess. Sorry, couldn't help myself...........


Yes, I can't help but to agree with you on that. Usually if they think a ballon helps is because they are holding less with the reins and concentrating more on breaking a ballon on the horses head. I have heard this old tale every since I was a kid, never saw it be a usefull trianing tool .

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Postby flaboy- » Wed May 31, 2006 6:34 am

Heritage_Farmboy wrote:about pulling them over...when I was young...i'd get one a few horses that my dad hadn't broke yet and they'd rear up and i'd get scared and just hold on and pull on the reins and I never came close to pulling one of em over backwards...seems like it'd be a pretty hard tast to pull a horse over backwards just to break it from rearing...seems like it'd get right many of your horses hurt too...when horses rear up...they usually dont rear up so far that they'll get themselves off balance...they usually got more weight going forward than a person could just pull backwards and make the horse fall over


Maybe I should clear this up for you farmboy. When I said I used to pull them over here is how I did it. Many times I would ride it out by releasing the reins. Sometimes after a few "I will scare him off" attempts, I would have a longish lead rope on them, wait for them to go up really good, slide off to the ground and snatch them over. When I am on the ground, I will try to catch them up high, run around to one side, and then snatch them over. I really don't like to do this but you do what you have to do. My main means of curing this is whip the front of their legs just above the hoof only when they are up. I use a 3 1/2 foot fiber glass golf shaft so you have to be willing to get up close and personal with them. I had a stud one time that would go up and actually walk on his hind feet towards me pawing at me. The stick didn't work on him. I managed to catch him and pull him over and it knocked the wind out of him. I quickly jumped on his head and held him down for about 15 minutes. That horse NEVER went back up and he never fought me again. Just my experience.
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Postby cowspider » Wed May 31, 2006 8:45 am

I managed to catch him and pull him over and it knocked the wind out of him. I quickly jumped on his head and held him down for about 15 minutes. That horse NEVER went back up and he never fought me again. Just my experience.



I have a yearling stud colt that rears up, maybe this will help him :cboy:
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Postby flaboy- » Wed May 31, 2006 1:53 pm

cowspider wrote:
I managed to catch him and pull him over and it knocked the wind out of him. I quickly jumped on his head and held him down for about 15 minutes. That horse NEVER went back up and he never fought me again. Just my experience.



I have a yearling stud colt that rears up, maybe this will help him :cboy:


Just be REAL careful! I have pulled them down only to have them bounce back up almost immediately. If you are moving in to pen them down you can get hurt. I would recommend a flexible hard stick to the legs first and only do this when they are off of the ground or you see them start up. Don't attempt to hold them down (with the lead rope)either. Let them have slack and go up if they want. Some take longer than others to learn and then there are the ones I have pulled over. :shock:
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Heritage_Farmboy

Postby Heritage_Farmboy » Wed May 31, 2006 7:13 pm

cowspider wrote:
I managed to catch him and pull him over and it knocked the wind out of him. I quickly jumped on his head and held him down for about 15 minutes. That horse NEVER went back up and he never fought me again. Just my experience.



I have a yearling stud colt that rears up, maybe this will help him :cboy:


pulling a horse over is the last thing i'd want to do...all it takes is one wrong fall and you got a lame horse...maybe it will work sometimes but sooner or later i'd say the colt is going to get hurt...there are many more ways to teach a horse than to throw him over...a lot SAFER ways for you and the horse...I aint got nothing against the way flaboy trains his horse...they're his horses...he can train them how it pleases him...and he probably doesn't even do it unless he feels there's no other way possible to stop the horse from bucking

your stud is a youngun cowspider...he still wants to play...he'll rear up as a game...stop a horse from bucking is all about moving his feet...moving their feets shows them you are the boss there...if you can move a horses feet then that is a sign they are giving in and saying that you are the leader...just work on moving your colts feet...that should get him to stop rearing and it will even give him a better overall attitude...if he runs at your or bites at you...once you show him your the boss and you can move his feet...he'll stop all of that nonsense
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Postby msscamp » Wed May 31, 2006 9:27 pm

Heritage_Farmboy wrote:
cowspider wrote:
I managed to catch him and pull him over and it knocked the wind out of him. I quickly jumped on his head and held him down for about 15 minutes. That horse NEVER went back up and he never fought me again. Just my experience.



I have a yearling stud colt that rears up, maybe this will help him :cboy:


pulling a horse over is the last thing i'd want to do...all it takes is one wrong fall and you got a lame horse...maybe it will work sometimes but sooner or later i'd say the colt is going to get hurt...there are many more ways to teach a horse than to throw him over...a lot SAFER ways for you and the horse...I aint got nothing against the way flaboy trains his horse...they're his horses...he can train them how it pleases him...and he probably doesn't even do it unless he feels there's no other way possible to stop the horse from bucking

your stud is a youngun cowspider...he still wants to play...he'll rear up as a game...stop a horse from bucking is all about moving his feet...moving their feets shows them you are the boss there...if you can move a horses feet then that is a sign they are giving in and saying that you are the leader...just work on moving your colts feet...that should get him to stop rearing and it will even give him a better overall attitude...if he runs at your or bites at you...once you show him your the boss and you can move his feet...he'll stop all of that nonsense


Maybe I'm misunderstanding your post, but there is a big difference between bucking and rearing. Neither of them are desirable traits, but I think I would take a bucker over one that rears any day of the week. As previously mentioned, the horse that pulled over only reared when she became angry at having to do something and was throwing a fit. That is a dangerous, unpredictable animal. I have a hard time believing anyone would intentionally pull a horse over backwards unless nothing else had worked to stop the rearing, but then again, I've seen some of the so-called 'horse trainers' up here work and I'm probably wrong.
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Postby flaboy- » Thu Jun 01, 2006 6:25 am

msscamp wrote:Maybe I'm misunderstanding your post, but there is a big difference between bucking and rearing. Neither of them are desirable traits, but I think I would take a bucker over one that rears any day of the week. As previously mentioned, the horse that pulled over only reared when she became angry at having to do something and was throwing a fit. That is a dangerous, unpredictable animal. I have a hard time believing anyone would intentionally pull a horse over backwards unless nothing else had worked to stop the rearing, but then again, I've seen some of the so-called 'horse trainers' up here work and I'm probably wrong.


I agree with ya msscamp. Big diff between bucking and rearing. Ya can usually ride the buck out of them. As for pulling them over, well I have only done it to maybe 3 or 4 nasty critters that nothing else would work on. Like Alan said, I am getting too old to fight them unless I have no recourse. I guess farmboy didn't see my recommendation to use a stick to the legs first. I would NEVER recommend snatching one over unless all other methods have been exhausted.

That stud horse I talked about that I sat on his head. Well that horse turned out to be my buddy for 30 years. He died in my fields.
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Postby Alan » Thu Jun 01, 2006 9:00 am

cowspider wrote:
I managed to catch him and pull him over and it knocked the wind out of him. I quickly jumped on his head and held him down for about 15 minutes. That horse NEVER went back up and he never fought me again. Just my experience.



I have a yearling stud colt that rears up, maybe this will help him :cboy:


I will throw my hat in here an agree with the advice you got from Flaboy. Your yearling is just playing and push the line a little. Not ready to be pulled over, a whip to the legs, while he is up will work fine. The legs are off the ground the legs need the negitive reaction to the colts action. Pulling a horse over will shock the horse into not rearing, but it might also kill them on the spot. A not so hard hit to the top of a horses pole can drop them like a rock.

I also do this when a youngster rears in lead, I will try to step to the side and pull his head toward his butt, just hard enough to twist his head around and make it uncomfortable for him. That usually ends the rearing for the session. I wouldn't pull him over until rearing is an all the time habit and very dangerous for you.

JMO, good luck
Alan
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Postby cowspider » Thu Jun 01, 2006 10:18 am

Thanks, Guys I will work at getting his attention in otherways. :cboy:
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Postby peg4x4 » Thu Aug 24, 2006 3:27 pm

ok,I got a filly in that would rear anytime anyone got on her...checked her feet--the 'hoofstay'(?) beside the frog was really long and curled over into the frog on all 4 feet! Never saw anything like it before or sense! anyway once her feet didn't hurt she was as nice as could be..
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