Skinny Horse, Nothing Working

Horse management, health, feeding and grooming.
Killala

Postby Killala » Thu Dec 21, 2006 4:17 am

msscamp wrote:JoLy, have you had her teeth checked? If she has teeth problems, the type of feed isn't going to matter much. If you haven't already done so, you might try soaked beet pulp or mashes that don't require actual chewing. Another good source of fat is oil's, such as corn oil - there is another one, but I can't think of the name of it. Have you tried googling 'senior horse and what/how to feed'? http://WWW.Equisearch.com has some very good information for this type of situation. I fully understand what you're trying to deal with, we have a 25 year old mare that has arthritis. I honestly don't think she will make it through the winter. We had several cold days earlier in the week, and they took a pretty serious toll on her - I expect she will be put down when winter arrives in earnest. :( That will be a very sad day, because she is one helluva horse!


I sympathise with you. I had our 34 year old gelding put down a few weeks back... he'd had arthritis for some years in his shoulder, found it difficult to lie down but lived a happy life otherwise. The only reason for his death was his lack of molars.
0 x

User avatar
jersey lilly
Rancher
Rancher
Posts: 556
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2005 9:25 am
Location: South East Texas

Postby jersey lilly » Fri Jan 05, 2007 9:16 pm

do a read up on Stomach Ulcers in horses. If this horse is stalled, or kept in a pen where there is no grass that's most likely what the problem is. 90% of horses that are stalled have stomach ulcers, and they will eventually get bad enuff that they won't eat grain. If this is the case, get the horse either on pasture, or on hay 24 hours a day....free choice as much as she wants.

Why do I say this you ask? I'm goin thru this as we speak with my daughters barrel horse. They make acid in their stomach whether they have food in front of them or not. 24 hours a day the acid is being made, and if there is nothin in the stomach it's sittin there eating away at the stomach lining.
My daughters barrel horse has a lil bit different story, he had major colic surgery Sept 15, and was off feed totally while at the vets office for 4 days. (they withheld feed for the first few days so his intestines could heal enuff that he could then start eatin again) He wasn't gaining any weight at all, and wouldnt finish his grain. so we took him to the vet Tuesday of this week.
We now hafta give him 60cc of mylanta 30 minutes before his grain is put out or he won't even touch it. After he finishes his grain, he has hay available to eat alllllll dayyyy, then the same mylanta treatment before his evenin grain and all night that's the important part. The more grass or hay they eat, they make saliva while eating which helps nutrilize the acid in the stomach. Which in turn helps the ulcers to heal.
Hope this helps.
0 x
A good rain and a baby calf are always welcome here.

User avatar
Alan
GURU
GURU
Posts: 9481
Joined: Sun May 09, 2004 11:54 am
Location: NW Oregon

Postby Alan » Fri Jan 05, 2007 9:52 pm

jersey lilly wrote:do a read up on Stomach Ulcers in horses. If this horse is stalled, or kept in a pen where there is no grass that's most likely what the problem is. 90% of horses that are stalled have stomach ulcers, and they will eventually get bad enuff that they won't eat grain. If this is the case, get the horse either on pasture, or on hay 24 hours a day....free choice as much as she wants.

Why do I say this you ask? I'm goin thru this as we speak with my daughters barrel horse. They make acid in their stomach whether they have food in front of them or not. 24 hours a day the acid is being made, and if there is nothin in the stomach it's sittin there eating away at the stomach lining.
My daughters barrel horse has a lil bit different story, he had major colic surgery Sept 15, and was off feed totally while at the vets office for 4 days. (they withheld feed for the first few days so his intestines could heal enuff that he could then start eatin again) He wasn't gaining any weight at all, and wouldnt finish his grain. so we took him to the vet Tuesday of this week.
We now hafta give him 60cc of mylanta 30 minutes before his grain is put out or he won't even touch it. After he finishes his grain, he has hay available to eat alllllll dayyyy, then the same mylanta treatment before his evenin grain and all night that's the important part. The more grass or hay they eat, they make saliva while eating which helps nutrilize the acid in the stomach. Which in turn helps the ulcers to heal.
Hope this helps.


I'm not following you, why did your daughters horse get ulcers? because he is in a stall? Does he/her get out every day? I have stalled many, many horse for many years. I have had only one develope an ucler, that was due to him having an offset bite. He wasn't chewing his food well enough to completly digest his food, and he developed an ulcer and started colicing on a regular basis. Two things fixed him, a good equine dentist and treatment with Gastro Guard. But I don't think being in a stall caused his problem. But they have to get out and worked everyday or at least 10 to 12 hours of turnout everyday. Also if did your vet suggest keeping him on grain while he (sorry or she) is getting over the ulcer?

Just nosey,

Alan
0 x
I'm not afraid of hard work, I can lay down next to it and fall asleep without a problem.

User avatar
jersey lilly
Rancher
Rancher
Posts: 556
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2005 9:25 am
Location: South East Texas

Postby jersey lilly » Sat Jan 06, 2007 12:50 am

Ok I'll back up here with my story of how this started. Sept 15 2006 This horse colic'd. Not a normal colic. When surgery was done it was found that he had a stone about 5 in x 4 in x 3 in thick. This happened on a Thursday. He hadn't eaten any of his hay or grain. Thursday evenin, he was at the vets for surgery. Nothing offered to this horse until the following Monday evening. Because they can't have anything to eat following colic surgery of this kind. He was laid open, all his intestines removed, and the intestine was opened surgically in two different places. Ok he's standin there....for you might say 5 days with not a grain of food to eat. He was there a total of 10 days, when we got him home, he was only getting 1 lb of senior feed and hay. Took a while to get him back on full feed....only he never really would eat like before. Horses produce the stomach acid 24 hours a day 7 days a week whether they are eating or not. this acid is not good for the lining of their stomach when there's nothing else in there. Studies have been done where horses on pasture are put in a stall......and in less than 24 hours ulcers have already started to form. When ulcers are present, they can't digest the food they do eat, and it's like they have real bad heartburn, nor do they get much nutritional value out of it so to speak. Yes normally more nutrients are absorbed in the large and small intestines...but if the first stage of digestion is upset, then the other doesn't work as it's designed either. They are basically eating it..and passing it without getting the nutrients from the feed. This horse had to be confined for medical reasons durin his recovery. But I had no idea that ulcers formed that fast. Until I really got to wonderin about him and took him to the vet again Tuesday. I had read up on it...figured that was what was wrong, and sure enuff that's what it is. The vet suggested putting him on senior feed for now, beings it's easily digested. But he turns his nose up at it, unless we give him the mylanta first. Then in about 30 minutes he'll go ahead and eat his feed. He'll eat hay just fine. But that's just the horse in him trying to fix himself. He would heal just fine on hay, or pasture either one, as long as he has it available all the time and can eat constantly like a horse is intended to do. Natural setting, horse on pasture will graze 20 hours a day. Horses kept in a stall, or pen area that doesn't have grazing available are so succeptable to ulcers, it's almost a guaranteed deal that they will get them at some point and time, if they don't have free choice hay available. Race horses are notorious for getting ulcers, because most are only fed once a day. Stalled all the time.
Him bein at the vets office for 10 days in a stall...was the beginnings of the ulcers....he's not eaten really well since then. He's in a pen.....we fed like most other people feed their horses that are stalled or penned....fed hay and grain in the morning and evening. But that's not enuff....hay 24 hours a day.
I hope this made it more clear as to what's goin on with our own horse...but if you or anyone else will google "Stomach Ulcers in Horses" and do a little reading, you'll find out what I've found out. Yes it can be fixed with the expensive Ulcerguard meds but it can also be fixed with hay and pasture naturally instead of goin broke tryin to keep him in a stall and get him over the ulcers.
0 x
A good rain and a baby calf are always welcome here.

User avatar
Alan
GURU
GURU
Posts: 9481
Joined: Sun May 09, 2004 11:54 am
Location: NW Oregon

Postby Alan » Sat Jan 06, 2007 9:32 am

Lilly,

It makes a lot more sense now, yes if you pull a horse that has most always been on pasture and stick him in a stall they will stress and contribute to an ulcer, not to discount your thoughts on 20 hours of grazing, I agree with that and no feed at the vets was a big factor also IMO. I still however have a hard time thinking that 80% of stalled horses get or have problems with ulcers, but will concede that it is surely alot higher than horses on a big pasture, meaning a 60 x 120 turnout is a big stall.

I'm sorry to hear about your problem with the colic surgery, what a tough and expensive thing to have to go through. Yes the ulcer prevention, cures are a expensive option also. I think the last time I used Gastro Guard it was almost $1000 for a 14 day supply, may have been a 28 day supply but still an outrages price.... but it worked.

Good luck,
Alan
0 x
I'm not afraid of hard work, I can lay down next to it and fall asleep without a problem.

MoGal
Rancher
Rancher
Posts: 808
Joined: Mon Feb 21, 2005 3:32 pm
Location: Southeast MO
Contact:

Postby MoGal » Sat Jan 13, 2007 11:51 am

Is there an update available on this horse? What did you find out from the vet? Did you have the teeth floated??

Thanks
0 x

mid-tn country boy
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 13
Joined: Sat Jan 06, 2007 8:41 pm
Location: Tennessee

skinny horse

Postby mid-tn country boy » Fri Mar 09, 2007 10:49 pm

One thing I would do is remove the mineral block and replace with a regular white salt block, the trace mineral block may be causing some problems with the horse getting the right nurtients that it needs to gain weight. Try looking on purina feeds website to get more info., I just went to a horse nuturtion clinic put on by purnia and they had a lot of info.,one of the products was to help horses gain weight, plenty of fresh water and good hay was two of the main things that they stressed. I hope this will help, I think the website will help.
0 x

mid-tn country boy
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 13
Joined: Sat Jan 06, 2007 8:41 pm
Location: Tennessee

skinny horse

Postby mid-tn country boy » Fri Mar 09, 2007 11:12 pm

The website for purnia feeds is nutrenaworld.com
0 x

dream catcher
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 1:19 am
Location: washington

Postby dream catcher » Sun Mar 25, 2007 1:07 am

I have a lot of older horses in my care and have a few with cushing and just old age, the best diet I have found to work is satin finish rice bran soak beet pulp oats a dash barley and a dash corn and cool calories twice aday and I feed one flake good grass hay 4 times a day. Teeth check twice a year, wormed every 3 months. And a good vite. It is important to stick to a feeding at the same time every day. I only feed a small amount of each like 1 1/2 lb oats 1 lb rice bran 1 lb soak beet pulp 1/4 lb barley and a small palm ful crimp corn and follow instructions on cool calories 100. You also feed hay a half hour before grain I have horse in late 20s that look great shinny coats. I also put cosiquin in for leg problems. I only grain 2 times a day.
0 x

dream catcher
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 1:19 am
Location: washington

Postby dream catcher » Sun Mar 25, 2007 1:14 am

One other thing I use is Neigh-lox it helps the digestive track. I had a mare that had ulcers bad and colic all the time she was on ulcer guard full dose for 30 days then 1/2 dose for another thirty days. then has been on Neigh-lox for 3 years now and not one colic since and she is on the feed . But while healing ulcers I gave her no grain grass hay and pasture only. Now she is back on full feed she is now 25. So I put all horses on ranch on neigh-lox, it works
0 x

persianhorse
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2005 4:30 pm
Location: Persia

Postby persianhorse » Wed Apr 04, 2007 10:34 pm

Hi:

Have you bottle feed this horse or the horse had the mother milk from the start?

With best wishes.
0 x

VtMapleGal
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 181
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 5:20 pm
Location: Vermont

Postby VtMapleGal » Thu Apr 05, 2007 6:03 am

I didnt have time to read all the post, but here are my thoughts. Just because 1 or 2 horses do good on your feeding program doesnt mean every horse will. If it was my horse i would free feed a GOOD 2nd cut hay. I would also give Beet pulp, Hay cubes (both well soaked) and hay strecher 3-4 times a day. I would get a grain like strategy by purina, which is higher in fat but wont make them hot. I would feed small amounts 3 x's daily. LOTS of water. Also, just because you are deworming them doesnt mean anything. have a fecal checked at the vet (ask them to send it to a lab, much more accurate and not much more expensive). Also draw blood for a general blood profile pannel, and ask about lyme disease in your area and other tick diseases. Many cause a horse to go thin. Make sure the other horses arent pestering this one. Also look into stomach ulcers.
0 x

cowgirl08
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 41
Joined: Sat Jun 30, 2007 11:06 am
Location: Ohio

Re: Skinny Horse, Nothing Working

Postby cowgirl08 » Sun Jul 15, 2007 6:53 pm

JoLy wrote:My family has 3 Arabian Mares. One is 15 yo, the other two are 14 y.o.s. The two bays 15 and one 14 y.o are both sleek, healthy and happy. Then there is Angy, a sickly looking thing with screaming ribs and hip bones. She was the result of a neglectful breeder who fed Angie's momma "calf lick" or something like that during the pregnancy, basically no real feeding supplement. She has horrible conformation, and was going to be put down right after birth, but with the help of some friends, we rescued her, after all, she is the half sister of one of our other horses.
We feed the bays and Angy the same feed, worm regularly, and have a mineral block and water available at all times. Yet her health has deteriorated until now she is literally nothing but skin nd bones. We have been giving her Weight Builder and red Cell for several months now, and we have seen little to no results.
Has anyone seen anything like this before? Any ideas? Even though she can never be ridden, she is a great conpanion horse and I've had her since she was a weanling, I would hate to see her suffer anymore than she has too if I can do anything

Is she penned with the other horses? if i were you, i would separte her from all but one (she needs a companion) fence off a plot of grass for the two of them. Really monitor her food. if she's with a bunch of other horses, she might not be getting as much as the others. hoses have a pecking order and with her being as small as she is, she could be at the bottom. is she too old to be worked? if not, lunge her to build up muscle, energy, and appetite.
0 x
The speed of life is at a gallop. Push your heels down in the stirrups and sit deep, cause your in for a long hard ride.

Bez>
Rancher
Rancher
Posts: 981
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2007 4:39 pm
Location: Over there!

Postby Bez> » Sun Jul 15, 2007 7:02 pm

I did not read the entire thread closely - just skimmed it - and finally - finally - someone asked if it has been seen by a veterinarian.

How the heck is a complete stranger from a 1000 miles away going to diagnose this?

Looks like the animal is well looked after so I would not suspect a feed issue - this is a sick horse.

Looks like this horse is slowly doing the terminal "dead horse disease".

Spend the money to have him looked at - or haul him to a veterinarian school - they are great.

Unless a cure is found soon - sounds like a bullet might be the merciful thing to do.

Or watch it die - pretty much your main choices.

Bez>
0 x

User avatar
ArrowHBrand
Rancher
Rancher
Posts: 574
Joined: Mon May 28, 2007 7:10 am
Location: NW Iowa

Postby ArrowHBrand » Sun Jul 29, 2007 9:27 am

If there was problems during pregnancy and could have been put down at birth, I don't think changing the diet is really going to do much. Now this is just my opinion. Being a horse owner isn't easy. Like Jake said, you have to view the situation from the horse's point of view. If the vet gives the horse a clean bill of health and you can afford to feed a hard keeper, than by all means keep her. But it sounds like a chronic problem and putting her down may be what's best for her even if it's not what's best for you.
0 x
"The cow is nothing but trouble tied up in a leather bag." - John Wayne in "The Cowboys"


Return to “Horse Care”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest