cribbing

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jesse
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cribbing

Postby jesse » Sun Dec 24, 2006 1:16 pm

I saw in another thread a connection with sweet feed young somewhat confined horses & cribbing. I'm wondering about my weanling fillies' cribbing/wood chewing habit. We feed them Frontrunner Phase 1, oats, hay free choice & mineral block. Does anyone have any opinions on this diet??
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Postby Alan » Sun Dec 24, 2006 1:34 pm

It all depends of what the horse is doing. If the horse is standing in the stall for 22 hours a day, think about how bored the fillies are. Get them out everyday for at least 8 hours, give the youngsters somthing to do. They like to play with traffic cones, barrels, balls, milk jugs with a few rocks in it.

I know your post was about feed, but cribbing, IMO, is caused by boredom more then to hot feed. If they are in a stall most of the time cut the protien and sweet feed down... give them less gas and more grass hay, but give them somthing to do.

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Postby jesse » Sun Dec 24, 2006 1:43 pm

Thanx Alan for your reply. To give more detail there are two weanling fillies in a 30x90 pen w/ lean to shelter (no stalls). I will try putting a few toys out there.
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Postby Alan » Sun Dec 24, 2006 1:52 pm

Happy to help, you may also give them something else to chew on, a mineral block, a hanging lick that is harder for them to get in their mouth, therefore lasting longer. But sometimes once they start to chew it's hard to get them to quit.

While I think they have plenty of room, a 30x90 can only be explored so much. How old are they, have you started any training yet?

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Re: cribbing

Postby msscamp » Sun Dec 24, 2006 7:51 pm

jesse wrote:I saw in another thread a connection with sweet feed young somewhat confined horses & cribbing. I'm wondering about my weanling fillies' cribbing/wood chewing habit. We feed them Frontrunner Phase 1, oats, hay free choice & mineral block. Does anyone have any opinions on this diet??


I have no knowledge about Frontrunner, but if it contains molasses it could be very well be contributing to your fillies wood chewing. I read an article in Equus magazine some time back that stated - the condensed version - that sweet feed can cause gastric upset and that the act of 'cribbing' causes a ph change in the stomach, thereby relieving the upset. This was borne out by a young colt that we had at the time. He was a very laid back, easy going horse, whom we were feeding a small amount of sweet feed - he nearly ate the barn! After reading the article, we cut out the sweet feed, and he stopped chewing wood. Of course, there is also the possibility that these fillies are the type of horse that 'needs a job', so to speak, to keep them from becoming bored and fretful. That is something only you can answer, but I would definitely check the label for molasses, then go from there. I hope this helps.
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Postby smart_slider » Sun Dec 24, 2006 8:36 pm

we have to weanling filly's who do the same thing when in stalls... we usually have them outside with free choice hay, equipride mineral, and grain sweetfeed 2ce a day... when it rains/snows, we have to bring them in and feed hay and sweetfeed; anyway, nomatter what we do, they still chew: they chew, but they don't windsuck/crib... sorry, i wrote alot... Merry Christmas!
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Postby jesse » Sun Dec 24, 2006 11:39 pm

Alan, they are 7 months old. We have been doing some ground/halter training. They will have a few acres of grass in the spring, but until then they will probably stay in the pen.
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Re: cribbing

Postby spinandslide » Wed Jan 03, 2007 5:36 pm

jesse wrote:I saw in another thread a connection with sweet feed young somewhat confined horses & cribbing. I'm wondering about my weanling fillies' cribbing/wood chewing habit. We feed them Frontrunner Phase 1, oats, hay free choice & mineral block. Does anyone have any opinions on this diet??


I think cribbing is more of a boredom issue then a feed issue. I would definantly find something to occupy their minds, a toy, something similar to those "pony pops" I see on TV.

Young horses tend to get bored so easily..like children!
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Postby chippie » Mon Jan 15, 2007 11:09 pm

Are they cribbing (swallowing air) or chewing the wood.

I read research that horses with ulcers are prone to start cribbing (windsucking). The cribbing produces endomorphins which gives the horse a good feeling.

I know what you are talking about the sweet feed = cribbing article/study. I'm not sure if I agree with it.

I think that maybe the sugar makes the horse fidgetty and it needs something to do. Like a kid that gets overactive on candy.

If they are chewing wood, try painting it with cheap lemon dish soap. It tastes nasty and will discourage the chewing.

Some horses just like to chew on wood like a person chewing on the end of a pen or pencil. The horses are just more destructive.
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