Tripping

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Just_a_girl
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Tripping

Postby Just_a_girl » Wed Apr 25, 2007 10:21 pm

Do Thoroughbreds have a problem with tripping?


I've had his feet adjusted and checked by the vet, no xrays as of yet......I'm trying to rule out problems with knees, or if he is just being a pain. He trips when we walk and he trips when we run, but I don't see any tripping when he's running in the pasture. ;-)
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msscamp
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Postby msscamp » Wed Apr 25, 2007 10:35 pm

I would suggest you find a good farrier and talk to him/her about this problem. Vets are not necessarily trained in the complications that can arise once a saddle and bridle are put on a horse, or in the subtle nuances of how a horses feet have been trimmed - they are trained more in physiology, which may or may not be the problem. It could be a simple matter of over-reaching, or it might be more complicated than that. Horses in the pasture tend to not have the problems of horses under saddle and bridle because the circumstances are different, and they don't have the incumbrance/control issues of said saddle and bridle.
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Re: Tripping

Postby milkmaid » Wed Apr 25, 2007 11:37 pm

Just_a_girl wrote:Do Thoroughbreds have a problem with tripping?


Not necessarily.

Navicular disease and other lamenesses are a possibility, as are improper trimming, inexperienced riders, etc.
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Postby kjones » Thu Apr 26, 2007 11:37 am

My thoroughbred will occasionally do this, when at a slow trot. Like if we are practicing a drill at a slow speed. I have found this to be from not picking up his feet enough to clear the worked up arena. At a quicker speed, say like a good canter he is very stable. At a full-out run its like he is floating. This may or may not be your problem. Make sure the hooves are in good shape and shod properly, the legs are sound and pay attention to the type of ground this happens on. This all should help you determine what is going on with your horse. Good luck.
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Postby Alan » Thu Apr 26, 2007 9:41 pm

I have years invested in my wife's TB, he did trip alot. We found that most of his tripping occurred while his mind was lazy. Remember I refuse to ride him now and my wife will only ride him at a walk or a trot..... no canter (nfr buck). But back when she was working him and he was in training, we found that the more he had to think about the better he did. Figure 8's, side passes, extended trots, etc. I know in his case he got bored and lazy just troting around without something to do. We also did what's called a "rocker" to his shoes. Bent the toe up a little to force him to pick up his feet faster, this is mostly for horse that clips themselves, but help with tripping.

Hoped this helps, and just incase anyone forgot.... I hate my wife's TB!

Alan
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Postby msscamp » Thu Apr 26, 2007 10:57 pm

Alan wrote:....and just incase anyone forgot.... I hate my wife's TB!

Alan


:lol: :lol: :lol:
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Postby Just_a_girl » Fri Apr 27, 2007 7:49 am

Alan wrote:Hoped this helps, and just incase anyone forgot.... I hate my wife's TB!

Alan


Alan, If I remember one thing about you, that would be it. :D

I have two horses, a QH and the TB. I do favor my QH over the TB, but ride the TB mostly.

I've actually had two farriers check his feet, and one adjust his feet. My vet is equine only and owns only thoroughbreds, she (vet) has not found anything, as of yet. His feet look good, he and my QH have been on a schedule for as long as I've had them.
Come to think of it, on long trail rides he goes up hills, down hills, picks his way very well on narrow trails above deep creeks, goes through mud and water does all this without missing a beat.
He trips when I'm leading him to load in my trailer, or leading him to the wash bay. So, I know it has nothing to do with the saddle, or being an inexperienced rider. I never haul my horses with their saddles on. I won't take a chance there, I have seen a couple of accidents happen because of it. My daughter's horse is navicular and with the way the farrier has him adjusted, we have never had a problem with him. He is 24 years old now.

I guess a leisure walk is just not his thing. :lol:
I will work him a little to give him something to focus his mind on before I go for little pleasure rides with him, and then go from there. I will also ask my farrier about "rocker."

I appreciate the input.....Thanks all....
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Postby Just_a_girl » Fri Apr 27, 2007 8:09 am

kjones wrote:My thoroughbred will occasionally do this, when at a slow trot. Like if we are practicing a drill at a slow speed. I have found this to be from not picking up his feet enough to clear the worked up arena. At a quicker speed, say like a good canter he is very stable. At a full-out run its like he is floating. This may or may not be your problem. Make sure the hooves are in good shape and shod properly, the legs are sound and pay attention to the type of ground this happens on. This all should help you determine what is going on with your horse. Good luck.


Kjones,

When you say "practicing a drill" what are you doing?

thanks for the input.....
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tripping

Postby holly heifer » Fri Apr 27, 2007 8:39 am

My quarter mare was tripping alot, the farrier rolled her toe
a little but that did not help. I took her to an equine chiropractor and her shoulder was "out" as well as some
vertebrae in her neck. she was adjusted twice and NO MORE
TRIPPING!!! :nod:
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Postby Alan » Fri Apr 27, 2007 9:53 am

Just_a_girl wrote:Come to think of it, on long trail rides he goes up hills, down hills, picks his way very well on narrow trails above deep creeks, goes through mud and water does all this without missing a beat.
He trips when I'm leading him to load in my trailer, or leading him to the wash bay.


Sounds like he is just being a little mind lazy. When he is comfortable, like around his home walking to a routine place, his mind will wonder and he will trip. When he is out on a trail ride and experiencing new things he is focused. I wouldn't worry about it. A "rocker" may not help his tripping in that case. A rocker is for a horse that clips the back of his front feet with his rear feet. It slimply causes the horse to complete the motion of his hoof faster and therefore pick up his feet quicker, usually you only rocker the front feet. With a rocker the horse also has less toe, and the shoe is bent upward at the toe. This changes the angle of feet and therefore puts new pressure on his tendons, give him time off if you do it and watch for heat in the tendons.

From what you have said I wouldn't worry too much about him tripping, it's just probably him, as it is a lot of TB's. If he was mine I wouldn't rocker him unless he is clipping himself, it's not too harsh but it sounds like he doesn't need the change.

JMO,
Alan
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Postby Alan » Fri Apr 27, 2007 9:55 am

I should also say that he will probably still trip going to the wash rack with a rocker.

Alan
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Postby redneckcowgirlmn » Fri Apr 27, 2007 11:29 am

Don't know if this helps or not, but had a "lazy" mare a few yrs ago, she'd do a 3 point nose skid landing in the middle of a trail, just seemed to forget to pick up her feet sometimes. Farrier did the rolled toe thing with her shoes, didn't help all that much. He said to put a pair of splint boots on the fronts... not the expensive sports medicine kind, just the cheaper, inside of cannon/upper fetlock protectors, 3 velcro straps on the outside...
She never tripped under saddle again. Kinda like it reminded her she had front feet. Just an idea, if there's nothing else wrong.
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Postby kjones » Fri Apr 27, 2007 3:23 pm

Just_a_girl wrote:
kjones wrote:My thoroughbred will occasionally do this, when at a slow trot. Like if we are practicing a drill at a slow speed. I have found this to be from not picking up his feet enough to clear the worked up arena. At a quicker speed, say like a good canter he is very stable. At a full-out run its like he is floating. This may or may not be your problem. Make sure the hooves are in good shape and shod properly, the legs are sound and pay attention to the type of ground this happens on. This all should help you determine what is going on with your horse. Good luck.


Kjones,

When you say "practicing a drill" what are you doing?

thanks for the input.....



When I say a drill I'm talking about a choreographed drill you would see a drill team perform. When we start with a new drill, it is allways done slow to give the riders and horses a chance to learn the pattern.
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Postby Just_a_girl » Fri Apr 27, 2007 7:00 pm

kjones wrote:
Just_a_girl wrote:
kjones wrote:My thoroughbred will occasionally do this, when at a slow trot. Like if we are practicing a drill at a slow speed. I have found this to be from not picking up his feet enough to clear the worked up arena. At a quicker speed, say like a good canter he is very stable. At a full-out run its like he is floating. This may or may not be your problem. Make sure the hooves are in good shape and shod properly, the legs are sound and pay attention to the type of ground this happens on. This all should help you determine what is going on with your horse. Good luck.


Kjones,

When you say "practicing a drill" what are you doing?

thanks for the input.....



When I say a drill I'm talking about a choreographed drill you would see a drill team perform. When we start with a new drill, it is allways done slow to give the riders and horses a chance to learn the pattern.


That is what I thought, but wanted to make sure. I rode with one for a few years here in Texas, and I loved it. It was fast paced, dangerous at times, :shock: but I still loved it. :D
If you didn't have any balance in the saddle, you did after those drills. :shock: :D

When you get a chance start a post and tell me all about you and your drill team. :D
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!

Postby Just_a_girl » Fri Apr 27, 2007 7:58 pm

I appreciate everyone's input. :D thank you! :D
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