Treats for doing what you ask

Horse management, health, feeding and grooming.

Do you give food treats during training sessions?

yes
6
43%
no
8
57%
 
Total votes: 14

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Alice
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Postby Alice » Fri May 04, 2007 11:49 am

I had the farrier out the other day. He told me that he had worked on some mustangs that the owners had gotten thru the BLM. When he'd asked the owners if they were tame enough to be worked on he was assured they were...they'd given them horsey treats to tame them. :shock:

He bowed out of that gig and gave them the name of someone that was able to sedate horses to work on them.

Msscamp, btw, we now have 2 horses that we ride...this horse thing is addictive, isn't it. We still have one of the rescues (the other one had to go back after his hoof missed my head by inches). The old red horse's tumor has begun to spread and the vet seems to think it's only a matter of time until he'll need to be put down. But until then, that wonderful old guy is still enjoying life...and we're enjoying loving on him. :heart:

Alice
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chippie
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Postby chippie » Fri May 04, 2007 11:53 am

Drumrunner you are right.

However isn't the question do you treat when you are training?

To me giving a horse a cookie when it comes is different than giving the horse a treat when it stops, a treat when it walks over a pole, a treat when it sets up for halter, a treat when it pivots, etc...
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DrumRunner728
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Postby DrumRunner728 » Fri May 04, 2007 11:59 am

Chippie, you are correct - that is the question. But there seems to be a wide range of opinions just in the few postings on the board. I think moderation is the key to most anything involving horses. Different people have different techniques and it doesn't necessarily make any one technique right or wrong. If it ain't broke, don't fix it. However, if it isn't working for you, or if it's causing more problems than it's solving, then you need to change your approach. That's all I'm saying.
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msscamp
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Postby msscamp » Fri May 04, 2007 7:53 pm

chippie wrote:To me giving a horse a cookie when it comes is different than giving the horse a treat when it stops, a treat when it walks over a pole, a treat when it sets up for halter, a treat when it pivots, etc...


I agree. There is also the problem of the horse being so occupied with the treats that he isn't paying attention to you and what you're asking.
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msscamp
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Postby msscamp » Fri May 04, 2007 7:59 pm

Alice wrote:Msscamp, btw, we now have 2 horses that we ride...this horse thing is addictive, isn't it.
Alice


Fortunately there is a cure - just think of what the hay will cost! :lol: :lol: I'm very sorry to hear that the end is nearing for the red horse, Alice. :( That is never an easy situation, but I'm a firm believer in them going out happy! Nipper had never had so grain in his life as he did in the several days between finding out the problem, and putting him down. ;-)
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sjr725
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Postby sjr725 » Tue May 15, 2007 2:01 pm

We pasture when they're not being used everyday in a large pasture with a creek and lots of willows - I have always given treats when they come to the whistle - just lazy - hate walking through there looking for them all - I can just stand up top and whistle and count them as they straggle out and head up to the gate for their snack - I just use alfalfa pellets - I don't know why they think it's special - but they do! When they're working I don't treat - and I try not to feed them right after I put them away after working - I want them to get a drink, have a roll in the grass and relax for a few minutes first - so they don't get used to racing back to the barn to eat.

But I have had a horse or two get away from me in the mountains or come untied from a picket overnight and such and I can usually (note, I say usually) just whistle and they come runnin' for the snack!
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peg4x4
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Postby peg4x4 » Wed May 16, 2007 10:52 am

sjr725 wrote:We pasture when they're not being used everyday in a large pasture with a creek and lots of willows - I have always given treats when they come to the whistle - just lazy - hate walking through there looking for them all - I can just stand up top and whistle and count them as they straggle out and head up to the gate for their snack - I just use alfalfa pellets - I don't know why they think it's special - but they do! When they're working I don't treat - and I try not to feed them right after I put them away after working - I want them to get a drink, have a roll in the grass and relax for a few minutes first - so they don't get used to racing back to the barn to eat.

But I have had a horse or two get away from me in the mountains or come untied from a picket overnight and such and I can usually (note, I say usually) just whistle and they come runnin' for the snack!
[/quote


Now,that last part is what I mean about "could save your life,or the horses"
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flaboy?
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Postby flaboy? » Thu May 31, 2007 5:34 am

Never when working them or training them. I only give them an oatmeal cookie once in the evening when I bring them up to the barn.

I did however have my horse slip loading in my new trailer and then he was thinking real hard about if he wanted to get back in so I offered him a cookie and he walked right in.
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Alan
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Postby Alan » Thu May 31, 2007 10:02 am

flaboy? wrote:I did however have my horse slip loading in my new trailer and then he was thinking real hard about if he wanted to get back in so I offered him a cookie and he walked right in.


That is one of the hardest things to get through for me. A couple of years back my gelding slipped in the trailer and went down. He loads fine now but it took alot of time and effort to get him back to loading in the trailer. I should say he loads okay not great, still working on it, he won't walk right in, it takes 3 to 5 minutes.

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flaboy?
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Postby flaboy? » Thu May 31, 2007 10:23 am

Alan wrote:
flaboy? wrote:I did however have my horse slip loading in my new trailer and then he was thinking real hard about if he wanted to get back in so I offered him a cookie and he walked right in.


That is one of the hardest things to get through for me. A couple of years back my gelding slipped in the trailer and went down. He loads fine now but it took alot of time and effort to get him back to loading in the trailer. I should say he loads okay not great, still working on it, he won't walk right in, it takes 3 to 5 minutes.

Alan


It was kind of funny. When I first brought this trailer home I left rear door open. It is a swinger/slider combo. Both horses walked up looked at it and walked inside to look around. Both at the same time. Figures the first time I need to haul him in it he slips huh?

I was kinda in a hurry and this boy can get excited so I just grabbed a cookie rather than fight with him.
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