trimming horses feet

Horse management, health, feeding and grooming.
Horse Guy
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Postby Horse Guy » Sat Jul 21, 2007 4:55 pm

ArrowHBrand wrote:Shoeing and trimming doesn't really bother my back, yet, but it is a big strain on my legs. Have you ever heard of "cowboy shoeing". In a nutshell, nail on the shoe and file the hoof to match. Guess the cowboys of the west used to do it often. Kind of interesting how things progress. Oh, and when you use your nippers for the first time, it may seem awkward, but you will get used to them! :lol:


Well im kind of tall and long in the back so my conformation doesnt help. Plus I could be set up better. Example shapeing shoes on my stall jack, well I should have it set up higher so im not bent over. Plus a lot of its feel. Example shapeing the shoe. Takes me way longer to do it than my good old experienced farrier could do it. Plus I had both knees broke twice so I cant use my legs like I should so I have to bend my back more to compensate.
"Cowboy Shoeing" sounds like a myth to me. Nail holes would be in the wrong spot. Shoe would never stay on. Example look at how fast sliders will pull off unless the horse is kept by itself.
Like I shape 96% or more of the hoof first. Then I shape the shoe to fit the horse<this is what takes me so long because I havnt been shoeing for very long. Then I nail on the shoe and then shape maybe a little bit more. Example take a bit of flare off the front of the hoof.
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ArrowHBrand
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Postby ArrowHBrand » Sun Jul 22, 2007 8:36 am

No I read about cowboy shoeing, but I can't remember where. It was just recently though. Anyhow our old farrier would trim the hoof, but not file it down then check to see how the shoe would fit. He would then shape the shoe if he needed to, nail it on, and then file the hoof down. When I say file the hoof down, I mean he would file the hoof flat, put on the shoe, and then file down the edge where the hoof is sharper than heck after trimming. I am right handed and I can file and shape quickly and efficiently, but when I go to use my left hand I tend to file skin off of my right hand, especially my thumb. It has happened more times than I will admit to.
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Horse Guy
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Postby Horse Guy » Fri Aug 10, 2007 9:58 am

Shoeing update
What used to take me 2 hours I can now do in twenty minutes.It doesnt take long to get the feel of where to pound the shoe in order to shape it the way you want it.
I also give the colts a bucket of grain about the time im ready to start pounding nails. This seems to really take their mind off it.
I also wear a back brace. This helps me a lot.
Plus once they get used to the cradle it really makes it easier for me.
Ive pretty much got my shoeing outfit paid for now. Sure doesnt take long.
If I can learn to do this than anybody can.
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smart_slider
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Postby smart_slider » Fri Aug 10, 2007 10:48 am

all i can say, horse guy and to everyone else is to be careful. the most important part of farrier-ry is the trim, you want a nice balanced foot with no lateral or medial deviation. if you learn the art, and everything technical, you'll be ok. but if you are just a fella going out and cutting hoof, you got some learning to do. i say this b/c i live with a farrier, and it is ALOT harder than people around here think.
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J&T Farm
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Postby J&T Farm » Fri Aug 10, 2007 7:32 pm

My husband is a horseshoer. and yes it is hard to get the foot just right, the smallest thing can cause alot of trouble is you don't know what you are doing. Ask a horseshoer. My husband gladly will help a customer learn the proper way to trim. And also alot of people don't realize how hard it is to shoe a horse that is laying all over you, or showing out. More people should work with there horses feet to get them more use to being shod and trimmed. It will make your shoer alot happier and more likely to help you out if you get in a bind. Just my opinion. :lol:
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Horse Guy
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Postby Horse Guy » Thu Aug 30, 2007 9:55 am

JTFarms I had to laugh at your post because honestly now that im doing the shoeing im sure spending a lot more time on colts getting them good with there feet than I ever did before when I was hireing a farrier.
But your right. How good a colt will stand has everything to do with how easy/hard it is to shoe.
Really frustrateing when your learning to shoe. Takes you forever to shape a shoe. Then you get one nail on and the colt throws a fit , takes the foot back and starts useing it enough that you have to pull the shoe and start all over again.
Thats what was making me curse at first. I should have had them better prepared. Should have had them more used to me taping them on the hoof with a hammer before I ever tried to shoe them.
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Re: farriers

Postby Lammie » Fri Aug 31, 2007 6:49 am

Cindy wrote:I agree NOT everyone should try to trim a horse.I have seen more than my share of BAD pros. I have seen alot of horses ruined because people have tried to do the work for them selves.
If you don't know what you are doing then Then learn from a PRO you can trust.Ask around at boarding stables the fancy ones will only hire the best! :)


Had my donk's hooves trimmed by someone who did not realize that their hooves are not like horse's. It was a mess. Now I have a farrier that comes out every three months and does it that knows and appreciates donkeys and mules. He's worth every cent. I will poke around a hoof if I think something isn't right. I am still learning, though, and I would hate to injure one of my animals. It has been bad enough around here this year as it is.
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luvs2ride1979
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Postby luvs2ride1979 » Fri Aug 31, 2007 9:44 pm

I trim my own. I have Pete Ramey's book and Jamie Jackson's book. I also frequent ironfreehoof.com. I think Ramey might have a video, http://www.hoofrehab.com

The best way to learn though, is to get a farrier to let you shadow him/her for a few working days, and then pay them to show you on your horses. That is what I did to get the feel for it, then I used the afore mentioned books to perfect the technique, so my horses stay sound barefoot on rocky terrain.
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ArrowHBrand
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Postby ArrowHBrand » Mon Sep 03, 2007 9:44 am

JT Farm, there is nothing worse than a horse that stands all over you no matter what you are doing. I hate when a horse invades my space and our horses learn quick not too, but when you buy an outside horse, they are usually pretty bad. Anyway, the main reason I learned to do farrier work because our farrier was unreliable, hard to reach, wouldn't return phone calls, and the last time he was out he smucked my weanling filly with his nippers because she wasn't standing the best. We work with all of our horses diligently to stand, but you can't compare a 6 year old horse who doesn't stand to a weanling who doesn't stand. Congrats Horse Guy, the first time I trimmed it took an hour per horse, now it takes 15-20 minutes. I don't have to track any one down, I can one or two after work, it's so convenient. We went to a horse show a couple of weeks ago and when we got there I noticed my 3 yr old mare had a "flap" of hoof that had chipped off on her front off side. Easy fix, get tools, nip hoof flap, file smooth, evaluate, a tick more file and done deal. There was a farrier on the grounds all weekend, but I would bet he wasn't going to be cheap because if you need farrier work at a show it usually is an emergency. To anyone who wants to learn the art of farrier, be careful and take your time in learning!
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