Swamp Cancer

Horse management, health, feeding and grooming.
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flaboy
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Swamp Cancer

Postby flaboy » Fri Oct 12, 2007 12:17 pm

Any home brews? My trainer friend has an Adams ranch filly with it. Vet says put her down. It's just at the top back of the hoof. Vet thinks the stuff he has treated her with won't do much good. She is a nice filly and we would like to try something.
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Re: Swamp Cancer

Postby milkmaid » Fri Oct 12, 2007 1:48 pm

flaboy wrote:Any home brews? My trainer friend has an Adams ranch filly with it. Vet says put her down. It's just at the top back of the hoof. Vet thinks the stuff he has treated her with won't do much good. She is a nice filly and we would like to try something.


Not familiar with it... does it have another name?
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Basics needed to answer questions: age, weight, breed, sex. # affected vs # in group, feed type/amount, prior vaccinations, deworming, antibiotics, any recent changes....

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Postby flaboy » Fri Oct 12, 2007 1:53 pm

Here something I copied that might help.

Swamp Cancer
A common lesion of the skin and mucosae of horses in tropical and subtropical regions. The lesions are dense granulation tissue in the form of an ulcer which may rapidly extend to 8 inches diameter. The tissue may contain cores of necrotic yellow or black, sometimes calcified, material referred to colloquially as leeches, grains or kunkurs. Distribution of the lesions varies with the etiology, but is concentrated mostly on the legs and ventral abdomen, below the medial canthus of the eye and on the muzzle and nearby mucosae. The cause may be any one of the following: Habronema megastoma larvae, or one of the fungi Hyphomyces destruens, Basidiobolus haptosporus or Entomophthora coronata. Called also hyphomycosis, bursatti, cutaneous habronemiasis, summer sore, equine phycomycosis, equine pythiosis, Florida horse leech.
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Postby milkmaid » Fri Oct 12, 2007 2:02 pm

What's he been treating her with so far?
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Postby flaboy » Fri Oct 12, 2007 2:11 pm

milkmaid wrote:What's he been treating her with so far?


Well, he opened it up and stuck his finger WAY up in the hole and pulled a bunch of the crystals out but said he wasn't sure he got them all. He then flushed it with something and gave her some vaccine. I am going down tomorrow to see if she has improved at all since last week.

What a shame. Real good cow horse.
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Postby milkmaid » Fri Oct 12, 2007 2:22 pm

Well... I haven't seen or dealt with it before, but, based on the description, if it's caused by fungi, then your best bet is probably some sort of very aggressive anti-fungal treatment. (Kind of a no-brainer, lol.)

Are pictures a possibility? I'm sure curious now.
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Postby Beefy » Fri Oct 12, 2007 2:23 pm

hmmm. never heard of that. if all fails you might as well try hydrogen peroxide. supposedly its a real miracle doer.
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Postby chippie » Fri Oct 12, 2007 8:25 pm

I'm sorry to hear that. The vet is right, the prognosis is poor.

I know of a horse with it who is currently at a vet school for treatment. It is costing the owner a fortune (getting close to 5 figures.) She loves the horse and won't put it down. It isn't cured yet and may still have to be euthanized.

Her horse got it by standing in a stock pond :( I think that it has it on two legs.
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Postby oscar p » Fri Oct 12, 2007 9:53 pm

It started out sounding like scratches, but scratches are on just on the legs above the hooves. If it is on the feet or legs i'd put koppertox on it. It cant kill her.
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Postby chippie » Sat Oct 13, 2007 7:33 am

More info:

The term “SWAMP CANCER” is used to describe a growth on horses that is not a cancer but in fact a fungal infection – Phycomycosis caused by the organism Hypomyces destrens. This infection probably acquired this name because they commonly occur on horses in swampy areas of the tropics and grow rapidly invading the tissue and developing a large fibrous reaction around them. Although they more typically occur in swampy, muddy or flood conditions they are also seen on horses in dry dusty paddocks. We do see an increase in number of cases during the warm humid conditions of the wet season.

The fungus is a normal soil organism that gains access through an injury, leech bite or possibly also insect bites. A firm swelling develops, ulcerates and exudes a blood-tinged fluid from holes [sinuses] in the growth. Characteristic granular yellow bodies called “kunkers” are found in the tumour. In long standing cases the local lymph vessels and nodes become enlarged and may become infected. Lesions are seen mainly on the legs and lower abdomen but may also occur on the head and recently noted inside the mouth of a horse. The horse often bites and kicks at the lesion and may resent examination.

Surgical excision is the most common treatment and general anaesthesia is usually required to allow careful dissection of the lesion from underlying structures + electrocautery of the underlying fibrous tissue. If the lesion is over / around tendons, joints, etc dissection may sometimes be very difficult if not impossible. In some cases a vaccine may be used to boost the horse’s immune system to fight off the infection. Topical sprays have been tried over the years with little success.

A similar growth that occurs with another fungus called Basidiobolus haptosporus. This infection is usually drier and slower growing. Unfortunately there is no vaccine against this organism so early excision is vital.
After surgical excision and electrocautery of the underlying tissue there will be an open wound approximately 1cm larger than the original lesion. This should be hosed twice daily and wound spray applied. Antibiotics and anti-inflammatories may be dispensed depending on the location and size of the lesion.

If the horse is not vaccinated against tetanus a short-acting anti-tetanus injection will be given. Good quality feed is essential after surgery as the horse has usually lost a significant amount of blood due to continual seepage from the growth and is often anaemic. The lesion should be watched closely for signs of re-growth and the clinic contacted.


This link has more information plus pictures of a dog with it.

http://www.floridahorse.com/leeches/leeches.html

and wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phycomycosis
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Canker

Postby clampitt » Sat Oct 13, 2007 10:23 am

I have a horse shoer friend that dealt with something simular I think in a horse in La.Called it Canker.Couldnt be healed same deal put the horse down.He uses an old stable sargent mix US Army.Formaldhyde and Lugals solution.Lugals is a 10%iodine mixed with some other things.I get both form a pharmacy near me.Mix even and pour it in or on for several days.But be ready cause it burns like a hot iron.If you get it in a cut on you you will understand.You might try that.Keep it clean but dont cover it up.let it air some.They have nothing to loose and all to gain by trying.This works on thrush and white line very well.And will make a horse foot hard as a rock.If they are pretty thined soaled.
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Postby chippie » Sat Oct 13, 2007 12:55 pm

it is different than canker. it affects the soft tissue, not the hoof.
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Postby flaboy » Mon Oct 15, 2007 5:52 am

Well, I went down this weekend and to me she looks no better. She has a big tumorous looking bleeding mass on the back just above the hoof. She is getting the dressing changed daily and it is getting cleansed with a bleach/water solution. I had recommended peroxide but they are following the vets advice right now.

My friend takes her out and walks her with the area exposed for while and then cleans and re-wraps it. I hadn't seen her in a week and had hoped things would look better. She doesn't seem to be in as much pain at least.

Oh, this is the same horse that got her belly opened up by a gator attack.
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Postby oscar p » Mon Oct 15, 2007 11:58 am

Flaboy, give koppertox a try. I bought a draft mare several years ago, that her legs, just above her hoof looked like hamberger meat. It smell like something dead. I tried everything, and nothing worked. I had a cow that was limping a little. So I caught her up, and was putting Koppertox between her toes. Then I thought what the he!!. I put it on the mares feet and it worked great. It is what I call scratches. Try it. But dont get it on your hands, you'll wear it for 3 or 4 days. I'll bet $5 to a donut it'll work.
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Postby flaboy » Tue Oct 16, 2007 5:35 am

Thanks Oscar. I will pick some up and take it down with me next time. Maybe I can talk them into trying it.
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