stall or pasture

Horse management, health, feeding and grooming.
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flaboy
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Re: stall or pasture

Postby flaboy » Fri Apr 11, 2008 12:07 pm

diamondn wrote:Well we stall our competition horses. They are blanketed and put in the stalls at night only. Turned out during the day. The one mare is better being stalled each night. She prefers being inside at night. The other mare arrived yesterday so we shall see what she prefers.

One of the broodmares also likes being stalled at night as well.

Just a different perspective.


With all due respect, how do you know one prefers to be stalled?
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Re: stall or pasture

Postby msscamp » Sun Apr 13, 2008 12:36 am

flaboy wrote:
diamondn wrote:Well we stall our competition horses. They are blanketed and put in the stalls at night only. Turned out during the day. The one mare is better being stalled each night. She prefers being inside at night. The other mare arrived yesterday so we shall see what she prefers.

One of the broodmares also likes being stalled at night as well.

Just a different perspective.


With all due respect, how do you know one prefers to be stalled?


Actually, that question is fairly easy to answer - a horse that prefers to be in a stall will usually paw at the closed stall door, and just generally be a pain in the be nice until the stall door is opened. We've had one or two of them, and usually just ignored their protesting the stall door being closed - they eventually got with the program.
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Re: stall or pasture

Postby flaboy » Mon Apr 14, 2008 6:09 am

quote="flaboy"]

With all due respect, how do you know one prefers to be stalled?[/quote]

msscamp wrote:Actually, that question is fairly easy to answer - a horse that prefers to be in a stall will usually paw at the closed stall door, and just generally be a pain in the be nice until the stall door is opened. We've had one or two of them, and usually just ignored their protesting the stall door being closed - they eventually got with the program.


Well thank you mom. All this time I just figured they wanted to be fed. :D
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Re: stall or pasture

Postby msscamp » Tue Apr 15, 2008 2:38 am

flaboy wrote:quote="flaboy"]

With all due respect, how do you know one prefers to be stalled?


msscamp wrote:Actually, that question is fairly easy to answer - a horse that prefers to be in a stall will usually paw at the closed stall door, and just generally be a pain in the be nice until the stall door is opened. We've had one or two of them, and usually just ignored their protesting the stall door being closed - they eventually got with the program.


Well thank you mom. All this time I just figured they wanted to be fed. :D[/quote]

You're welcome, son, and that could very well be the case with your horses, I'm just relaying what I've seen with our horses. :P :lol: :lol: I know they weren't bored, because they were being ridden regularly, none were high-strung, and had the opportunity to create mischief with their next door neighbors if they choose to - they rarely did. I know it wasn't excess energy, because they were being ridden regularly, were fed only grass hay, and did not receive any grain. The problems with pawing/messing with the stall door did not start until, for whatever reason, they had been given access to said stall, and were subsequently shut out. Maybe I'm wrong - but it appears to add up. :lol:
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Re: stall or pasture

Postby Katie » Sun Apr 20, 2008 3:57 pm

we only stall while feeding then turn out to pasture after they get through eating. If you have more than one horse you will want to seperate them while they eat or one will get more or all of the feed.
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Re: stall or pasture

Postby cowpunk'd » Fri May 02, 2008 10:56 am

It can help the training process to have a young horse stalled, because getting worked becomes something they look forward to. They get out of the boring stall for a training session. It also helps him learn to rely on his trainer to be his leader, if he is not turned out with other horses who can fill that role. So you develop a horse with a good work ethic that views you as his leader. Horses need to learn alot of things to be useful, stalling a horse during training can speed up a couple of important ones.
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Re: stall or pasture

Postby flaboy » Fri May 02, 2008 11:32 am

cowpunk'd wrote:It can help the training process to have a young horse stalled, because getting worked becomes something they look forward to. They get out of the boring stall for a training session. It also helps him learn to rely on his trainer to be his leader, if he is not turned out with other horses who can fill that role. So you develop a horse with a good work ethic that views you as his leader. Horses need to learn alot of things to be useful, stalling a horse during training can speed up a couple of important ones.


I have told folks that I make my horses wait and follow a specific routine when I do feed them in the stall. They tell me I am crazy for going in with them at feeding time. My logic is, if I can exhibit my dominance during his feeding frenzy he will develop a better respect for me. They won't stick their heads in the bucket until I say "ok".

I did have a problem with one that kicked me as he walked by me in the stall. We had a meeting of the minds immediately and he no longer kicks.
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Re: stall or pasture

Postby msscamp » Sat May 03, 2008 12:32 am

flaboy wrote:
cowpunk'd wrote:It can help the training process to have a young horse stalled, because getting worked becomes something they look forward to. They get out of the boring stall for a training session. It also helps him learn to rely on his trainer to be his leader, if he is not turned out with other horses who can fill that role. So you develop a horse with a good work ethic that views you as his leader. Horses need to learn alot of things to be useful, stalling a horse during training can speed up a couple of important ones.


I have told folks that I make my horses wait and follow a specific routine when I do feed them in the stall. They tell me I am crazy for going in with them at feeding time. My logic is, if I can exhibit my dominance during his feeding frenzy he will develop a better respect for me. They won't stick their heads in the bucket until I say "ok".

I did have a problem with one that kicked me as he walked by me in the stall. We had a meeting of the minds immediately and he no longer kicks.


We don't normally feed grain so I don't have to go into stalls or pens, but I do a similar thing in that I will not feed a pawing horse, nor will I feed a horse that knocks the lid of his/her feeder down after I have raised it to put the hay in. If I approach a feeder and they are pawing, I walk away. Same thing with knocking the feeder lid down. I wait about 5 minutes, and try it again. If the same thing happens, then I go find something to do for about a half hour or so. If the same thing happens, then I put the hay just outside of their reach and go find something to do again. 4th time it happens, they have the entire night or day (as the case may be) to reconsider their behaviour.
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