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Re: Rain Rot

Posted: Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:03 am
by marven
One good indicator of a horse’s general physical condition is the state of its coat. A horse with a smooth, shiny coat is usually in good health, while a rough, dull, or patchy coat is a sign of underlying health problems. A horse’s skin is constantly under attack by a wide variety of viruses, bacteria, and biting insects. Symptoms of skin diseases can range from a simple, isolated skin lesion to generalized itching and hair loss over the entire body.
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Re: Rain Rot

Posted: Fri Oct 01, 2010 9:25 pm
by Nicole53
Hello!

As already stated "rain rot" is caused by Dermatophilus congolensisis...it is evident by the classic "paintbrush" appearance of the hair protruding through the scab after the lesions are removed...It is also true that there can be carrier states that exist, however it is a common misconception that it is a fungus. Dermatophilus congolensisis is actually a gram (+) Microaerophilic spore forming bacteria. It usually seen in the fall in winter monthes when it's damp hence the name "rain rot". Treatment involves: scab removal, bathing with an iodine shampoo or captan dip, and then 7 to 14 days of Penicllin (can also use erythromycin or oxytetracycline if you don't have penicllin)...I guess I did learn at least one useful thing in dermatology....good luck


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Re: Rain Rot

Posted: Mon Oct 04, 2010 12:14 pm
by jersey lilly
I think the label says Original M-T-G you can find it in the horse supplies at Tractor Supply. It's base is mineral oil I think, and has some sulfer smell to it. Alot of people don't like the smell...it's not so bad to me. Kinda smells like burnt rubber haha. Anyway...bath horse.....put that stuff on every day. Using sparingly. When I say that I mean. put it on and rub it into the areas affected by the rain rot. In just a day or so...all the scabs get loose and you can usually just bath again and they come off. You will however hafta bath with a good shampoo to get the oily off. Re-apply for a few days in a row. You don't hafta bath between applications if you don't want to. It's good stuff...and goes a long way. You hafta shake it up before each use because it settles out and will be clear on top and all the yellowish/white stuff in the bottom.

Re: Rain Rot

Posted: Tue Oct 12, 2010 12:17 am
by Nicole53
A horse’s skin is constantly under attack by a wide variety of viruses, bacteria, and biting insects. Symptoms of skin diseases can range from a simple, isolated skin lesion to generalized itching and hair loss over the entire body. Two of the most common varieties of skin diseases are ringworm, also called dermatophytosis, and rain rot, which is also known as dermatophilosis.Ringworm is a skin infection caused by a fungus, not a worm. It spreads between horses thorough the use of common grooming tools, saddle pads, or harnesses. Also, damp, dark, and crowded conditions (such as horses confined to their stable during the winter and fall) can predispose horses to contracting ringworm.
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Regardz!!!!!

Re: Rain Rot

Posted: Tue Oct 12, 2010 9:31 pm
by Jiellen29
Rain rot is caused by the fungal organism Dermatophilus congolensis. Other names of the disease are rain scald and streptothricosis. Contrary to what a lot of people think, the organism has not been demonstrated to proliferate or be present in dirt or soil. The organism is dependent on a carrier horse who has the organism on its skin, and who may or may not be affected by it. There is some natural immunity, but some horses seem to be more susceptible to it, and that's why some horses get it year after year.In order for a horse to get the disease, several conditions have to exist. You have to have an infected carrier animal, or a fomite such as a brush, blanket, or saddle that has the organism in the form of a spore that makes contact with the susceptible horse. There has to be some form of extreme moisture, like heavy rainfall. Horses that have heavy hair coats keep the moisture in contact with their skin, which helps the spores grow. And, the skin has to be damaged-from an insect bite, cut, or scrape. That lets the organism get down into the epidermis.
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Good day!!!

Re: Rain Rot

Posted: Tue Aug 12, 2014 10:27 am
by shadyhollowfarm
I had a stubborn case on my Paint horse in FL, after a hurricane brought days and days of rain. It was something out of the textbooks in terms of severity. The scurf area was the size of a lunch plate across his rump, thick, wouldn't come off and was very painful. Shampoo area if possible to remove dirt and allow to completely dry. Apply a thick coat of ichthammol over the affected areas. Let it sun bake for a few days. Amazingly the scurf will start easily shedding off. For severe cases like mine you'll have to repeat the above steps (shampoo, dry, apply ichthammol) several times until the lesions heal and all the scurf comes off. It will heal from the outside edges inward. Surprisingly it didn't stain up his coat, but by the time I tried this I didn't care. I just wanted the horse cured.