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Re: fence tips and tricks

Posted: Tue May 22, 2018 6:50 am
by callmefence
Farm Fence Solutions wrote:
callmefence wrote:
libertygarden wrote:Thanks Fenceman, regarding pulling wire, do you start top to bottom or bottom to top?
I pull the net as a whole. all at once. I start making off at the bottom then the top and fill in from there. theres some videos back in this thread. ill dig em out when I get a chance


I could have missed something Fence, but I think he's working with barb wire? I like to work from the top down, just because the wire won't hang up as much.
agreed. with barb wire everything goes top to bottom...thanks farm

Re: fence tips and tricks

Posted: Tue May 22, 2018 7:13 pm
by libertygarden
Well, thanks for sharing your experience.

Re: fence tips and tricks

Posted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 2:40 pm
by libertygarden
I tried renting a post hammer, but couldn't find one. So I dug a 4' deep holes for 8' posts and backfilled with 1' of concrete and the top 3' with road base. I also treated the posts with 50/50 used motor oil and diesel. The posts seem real solid, we'll see once I pull the wire.

Re: fence tips and tricks

Posted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 10:14 pm
by fence_it
libertygarden wrote:I tried renting a post hammer, but couldn't find one. So I dug a 4' deep holes for 8' posts and backfilled with 1' of concrete and the top 3' with road base. I also treated the posts with 50/50 used motor oil and diesel. The posts seem real solid, we'll see once I pull the wire.


Just build a good brace and you shouldn't have a problem.

Re: fence tips and tricks

Posted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 10:15 pm
by fence_it

Re: fence tips and tricks

Posted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 8:45 am
by greybeard
fence_it wrote:An American fence competition.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4GYmaKs ... e=youtu.be

My eyes..or are some of them driving the posts in leaning?
(the guy that did the video needs to call it, like horse racing.. "[i]And they're Off! Team one jumps out ahead, a member of team three dropped something and had to go back for it.. )

20 Mexicans with manual post hole diggers might give them all a run for their $$ too.

Re: fence tips and tricks

Posted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 11:08 am
by callmefence
I would like to invite them all for a fence building competition.

ImageImageImageImageimage upload

Re: fence tips and tricks

Posted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 11:47 pm
by fence_it
callmefence wrote:I would like to invite them all for a fence building competition.

ImageImageImageImageimage upload


Just looking at that rock makes me want to scream.

Guess I aint moving to Texas after all.

Re: fence tips and tricks

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 8:24 am
by Farm Fence Solutions
fence_it wrote:
callmefence wrote:I would like to invite them all for a fence building competition.

ImageImageImageImageimage upload


Just looking at that rock makes me want to scream.

Guess I aint moving to Texas after all.


Not all the rock in Fence’s territory is like that. Some of it is smooth as a parking lot and goes on for miles. The parking lot rock is much easier on tires. Lol

Re: fence tips and tricks

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 11:49 am
by greybeard
closest rock on my place is about 1500' straight down unless you count pea gravel and unconsolidated iron ore

Re: fence tips and tricks

Posted: Thu Jun 21, 2018 10:18 pm
by fence_it
Got my new strainrite chain strainer in yesterday. Bought it off some guy from Indiana selling them on ebay. Wonder who that could be... :lol:

Gave it a try today building braces and I was more than impressed. Sure beats the old worn out Hayes pair I was using. The spring loaded claws are slick, just crank away and the claws walk themselves up the chain.

Image

I think I've said this before, but a good chain strainer is the best fencing tool you could ask for. We use them for a couple different things. Mainly tensioning brace wire, make two figure 8 wraps of 12.5ga HT and tension the two ends with the chain strainer, then join with two long crimp sleeves. We also use them for tensioning our "tight line", or a strand of HT smooth wire placed on the ground and stretched tight to serve as a string line for putting in the posts. Tie the wire on one end and tension with the chain strainer pulling off the post on the other end. Works well and creates a perfectly straight line. I believe the main use these chain grabs are designed for is tensioning strands of HT smooth wire in a "New Zealand" style fence. We put permanent ratchet strainers in all of our HT plain wire, whether it be electrified or cold, but the chain grab is still useful for pulling the wire from the center and then using the slop the chain strainer has pulled out to put in a ratchet. Much easier with a chain strainer in most cases, especially on long runs when it can be difficult to wind up a ratchet. Chain strainers work great for stretching barb wire as well, especially high tensile barb wire that a traditional come-along and wire dog can struggle to properly grip. All chain grabs are designed for use with high tensile wire so slipping isn't a problem until they get a lot of wear on them.

This thread has been a little quiet lately, so I figured it could use another fence tip.

Re: fence tips and tricks

Posted: Fri Jun 22, 2018 12:45 pm
by greybeard
viewtopic.php?f=6&t=115668&p=1512224#p1512224

I'm sure someone can improve on this idea significantly but it has been working for me.

Re: fence tips and tricks

Posted: Fri Jun 22, 2018 12:56 pm
by Farm Fence Solutions
fence_it wrote:Got my new strainrite chain strainer in yesterday. Bought it off some guy from Indiana selling them on ebay. Wonder who that could be... :lol:

Gave it a try today building braces and I was more than impressed. Sure beats the old worn out Hayes pair I was using. The spring loaded claws are slick, just crank away and the claws walk themselves up the chain.

Image

I think I've said this before, but a good chain strainer is the best fencing tool you could ask for. We use them for a couple different things. Mainly tensioning brace wire, make two figure 8 wraps of 12.5ga HT and tension the two ends with the chain strainer, then join with two long crimp sleeves. We also use them for tensioning our "tight line", or a strand of HT smooth wire placed on the ground and stretched tight to serve as a string line for putting in the posts. Tie the wire on one end and tension with the chain strainer pulling off the post on the other end. Works well and creates a perfectly straight line. I believe the main use these chain grabs are designed for is tensioning strands of HT smooth wire in a "New Zealand" style fence. We put permanent ratchet strainers in all of our HT plain wire, whether it be electrified or cold, but the chain grab is still useful for pulling the wire from the center and then using the slop the chain strainer has pulled out to put in a ratchet. Much easier with a chain strainer in most cases, especially on long runs when it can be difficult to wind up a ratchet. Chain strainers work great for stretching barb wire as well, especially high tensile barb wire that a traditional come-along and wire dog can struggle to properly grip. All chain grabs are designed for use with high tensile wire so slipping isn't a problem until they get a lot of wear on them.

This thread has been a little quiet lately, so I figured it could use another fence tip.



That's actually a girl in Indiana that sells them on ebay. :lol: (I've been sleeping with her, so she gives me a discount) Glad you got them, but call next time. We give everyone on the forum a good discount. ;-)

Re: fence tips and tricks

Posted: Fri Jun 22, 2018 2:10 pm
by fence_it
Farm Fence Solutions wrote:
fence_it wrote:Got my new strainrite chain strainer in yesterday. Bought it off some guy from Indiana selling them on ebay. Wonder who that could be... :lol:

Gave it a try today building braces and I was more than impressed. Sure beats the old worn out Hayes pair I was using. The spring loaded claws are slick, just crank away and the claws walk themselves up the chain.

Image

I think I've said this before, but a good chain strainer is the best fencing tool you could ask for. We use them for a couple different things. Mainly tensioning brace wire, make two figure 8 wraps of 12.5ga HT and tension the two ends with the chain strainer, then join with two long crimp sleeves. We also use them for tensioning our "tight line", or a strand of HT smooth wire placed on the ground and stretched tight to serve as a string line for putting in the posts. Tie the wire on one end and tension with the chain strainer pulling off the post on the other end. Works well and creates a perfectly straight line. I believe the main use these chain grabs are designed for is tensioning strands of HT smooth wire in a "New Zealand" style fence. We put permanent ratchet strainers in all of our HT plain wire, whether it be electrified or cold, but the chain grab is still useful for pulling the wire from the center and then using the slop the chain strainer has pulled out to put in a ratchet. Much easier with a chain strainer in most cases, especially on long runs when it can be difficult to wind up a ratchet. Chain strainers work great for stretching barb wire as well, especially high tensile barb wire that a traditional come-along and wire dog can struggle to properly grip. All chain grabs are designed for use with high tensile wire so slipping isn't a problem until they get a lot of wear on them.

This thread has been a little quiet lately, so I figured it could use another fence tip.



That's actually a girl in Indiana that sells them on ebay. :lol: (I've been sleeping with her, so she gives me a discount) Glad you got them, but call next time. We give everyone on the forum a good discount. ;-)


Will do. Do you guys stock the ez-pull or ultra-crimp tool by chance?

Re: fence tips and tricks

Posted: Fri Jun 22, 2018 2:36 pm
by Farm Fence Solutions
fence_it wrote:
Farm Fence Solutions wrote:
fence_it wrote:Got my new strainrite chain strainer in yesterday. Bought it off some guy from Indiana selling them on ebay. Wonder who that could be... :lol:

Gave it a try today building braces and I was more than impressed. Sure beats the old worn out Hayes pair I was using. The spring loaded claws are slick, just crank away and the claws walk themselves up the chain.

Image

I think I've said this before, but a good chain strainer is the best fencing tool you could ask for. We use them for a couple different things. Mainly tensioning brace wire, make two figure 8 wraps of 12.5ga HT and tension the two ends with the chain strainer, then join with two long crimp sleeves. We also use them for tensioning our "tight line", or a strand of HT smooth wire placed on the ground and stretched tight to serve as a string line for putting in the posts. Tie the wire on one end and tension with the chain strainer pulling off the post on the other end. Works well and creates a perfectly straight line. I believe the main use these chain grabs are designed for is tensioning strands of HT smooth wire in a "New Zealand" style fence. We put permanent ratchet strainers in all of our HT plain wire, whether it be electrified or cold, but the chain grab is still useful for pulling the wire from the center and then using the slop the chain strainer has pulled out to put in a ratchet. Much easier with a chain strainer in most cases, especially on long runs when it can be difficult to wind up a ratchet. Chain strainers work great for stretching barb wire as well, especially high tensile barb wire that a traditional come-along and wire dog can struggle to properly grip. All chain grabs are designed for use with high tensile wire so slipping isn't a problem until they get a lot of wear on them.

This thread has been a little quiet lately, so I figured it could use another fence tip.



That's actually a girl in Indiana that sells them on ebay. :lol: (I've been sleeping with her, so she gives me a discount) Glad you got them, but call next time. We give everyone on the forum a good discount. ;-)


Will do. Do you guys stock the ez-pull or ultra-crimp tool by chance?


We don't stock them, but can get them in our next container if you want. Livewire in CA might have them.