colorado to Missouri??

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cowchaser
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colorado to Missouri??

Postby cowchaser » Mon Mar 06, 2006 1:43 pm

Would really appreicate any input or suggestions on making the transition from CO to MO. We are planning on taking our cows with us. We have looked in several states, and have decided to go where it rains! Have heard about Fescue, ice storms etc. We don't know what to expect. We would like to find a place in Northwest MO.
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Postby BHag » Mon Mar 06, 2006 3:10 pm

Still going to have periods of no rain. Missouri is currently one of the states under drought. However, you would be hard pressed to find a better home. Lived in Maryville for a time and loved it. The people were wonderful. Not to mention all of the smaller neighboring towns. Don't rule out the rest of the state.
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Postby mdmdogs3 » Mon Mar 06, 2006 4:01 pm

I used to live 60 miles from the northwest Missouri border in Iowa and now I live 20 miles from the southwest Missouri border in Arkansas
It probably depends where in Colorado you are coming from but the parts of Colorado I've been to in the winter the snow comes and goes - well in SW Iowa it comes and stays
and I swear Kansas City has to be the ice storm capital of the earth. Personally I'm thrilled to have moved south even if right now we are in a severe drought - this can't last forever.
As far as the people - the midwest is pretty much the same - just plain ole' folks - in the city it is rush rush rush but in the smaller towns people don't get so excited -
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dun
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Postby dun » Mon Mar 06, 2006 4:05 pm

Have you looked at the topography of the area? Does the term flat as kansas mean anythign to you?

dun
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cowchaser
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Postby cowchaser » Tue Mar 07, 2006 9:55 pm

Thanks for the imput. We have been to MO quite a few times now, but it is hard to see everything. I have seen the MO is lacking rain now also. We have been slightly better here the past 2 years. We are still dealing with an average of 10-12 inches of moisture on a good year. Have heard that cattle can have respiratory trouble with too much moisture?? Ever heard or dealt with anything?? How much rainfall to you have in your area?
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Postby cowchaser » Tue Mar 07, 2006 10:01 pm

Good to hear from you dun. I must say the elevation and "hills" are a change from CO. Nice part is no mountains no frantic skiiers and greenies. We like the rolling hills and hardwood trees, especially since we do woodworking. Our elevation here is 6200 feet. Have you ever heard of cows having trouble going down in elevation? We can get brisket disease here when we go to the high country at 8200 ft. What kind of cattle do you raise?
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Postby cowchaser » Tue Mar 07, 2006 10:08 pm

thanks for the reply mdmdogs3. I have never been a severe ice storm. Once in a while here we get some, but not the measurable type. We have blizzards, -40 below and wind. We basically are a high desert here. Not much moisture, but a lot of nasty. We looked in southern MO, but didn't want to fight more brush. Maybe we don't know what we're looking at. We have lots of brush here too. Do you clip, spray or try to graze goats or something to manage it? How fast does it come back? Here if we "brush beat" it, it comes back with a different kind of brush. agh! I hate brush!
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dun
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Postby dun » Tue Mar 07, 2006 11:16 pm

cowchaser wrote:Good to hear from you dun. I must say the elevation and "hills" are a change from CO. Nice part is no mountains no frantic skiiers and greenies. We like the rolling hills and hardwood trees, especially since we do woodworking. Our elevation here is 6200 feet. Have you ever heard of cows having trouble going down in elevation? We can get brisket disease here when we go to the high country at 8200 ft. What kind of cattle do you raise?


The only problem I've heard of in moving from CO, don;t know what part it was, to MO was the fescue toxicity issue. Woman lost a few and nearly lost the rest of a bunch of Highlanders when she first moved.
The northern part of MO to me is flat, the rolling hills don;t start till you get to the ozarks. Part of the reason there's brush around here is because we generally have a good growing season and conditions. Once cleared if you graze it there isn;t much of a problem.

dun
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Postby cowchaser » Wed Mar 08, 2006 10:50 am

I don't mind the flat so much, grew up in a narrow mountian "drainage", where you get a neck ache triing to see out. Were I live now is more like a park. We are in a flat bottom with hills/mountians all around. I much prefer being able to see. I do worry about tornadoes though, usually flat plains=toradoes. Have you had any close calls? I am concerned about the fescue. I don't know if there is anyway to "prepair" our cows for it. I guess I'm figuring on some loss, hopefully not deaths, just some that can't adapt. We raise Blk angus Blk Sim Cross surely more heat tolerant than highlanders?
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Postby dun » Wed Mar 08, 2006 11:18 am

cowchaser wrote:I am concerned about the fescue. I don't know if there is anyway to "prepair" our cows for it. I guess I'm figuring on some loss, hopefully not deaths, just some that can't adapt. We raise Blk angus Blk Sim Cross surely more heat tolerant than highlanders?


If you feed hay and only turn them out for short periods of time on the fescue until you get something growing with fescue I don;t think it would be that much of a problem. They gradually need to adjust to the endophyte, but they will adjust if introduced to it gradually. Being preemptive is the key. Don;t let the problem get a toe hold before doing something. Some cows adjust without a problem, others take up to several years

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Postby cowchaser » Wed Mar 08, 2006 11:28 am

If you feed hay and only turn them out for short periods of time on the fescue until you get something growing with fescue I don;t think it would be that much of a problem. They gradually need to adjust to the endophyte, but they will adjust if introduced to it gradually. Being preemptive is the key. Don;t let the problem get a toe hold before doing something. Some cows adjust without a problem, others take up to several years

dun[/quote]

Can you "repair" a cow who has had to much fescue if you feed her something else? Have seen missing tails, bad feet, and cows in ponds anything other symptoms? This is probably off the wall, but are there any mineral supplements that can help? We are looking a a place that probably is 90% fescue, but has been grazed short regularly does this help? I have also heard you can have more problems in the spring when new growth starts.
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Postby cowchaser » Wed Mar 08, 2006 11:33 am

BHag wrote:Still going to have periods of no rain. Missouri is currently one of the states under drought. However, you would be hard pressed to find a better home. Lived in Maryville for a time and loved it. The people were wonderful. Not to mention all of the smaller neighboring towns. Don't rule out the rest of the state.


where abouts are you? Have made a big loop around the state. Anything we need to be concerned about out there? Do you like the climate? We would have to adjust to humidity. Was a farmer for a while, don't miss it too much, mother nature is too fickle.
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Postby dun » Wed Mar 08, 2006 11:36 am

cowchaser wrote:Can you "repair" a cow who has had to much fescue if you feed her something else? Have seen missing tails, bad feet, and cows in ponds anything other symptoms? This is probably off the wall, but are there any mineral supplements that can help? We are looking a a place that probably is 90% fescue, but has been grazed short regularly does this help? I have also heard you can have more problems in the spring when new growth starts.


There are minerals that will help to mitigate the problem. Cargill or someone has some stuff called endophyter, may work but our cows won;t touch the stuff. Minerals with CTC will also help some. But the CTC is just minor patch. The idea is to gradually condition to the stuff. The spring and if the stuff starts to go reproductive rather then vegetive are the worst times of year. Of course winter on stockpiled or fescue or fescue hay is when the majority of the problems with missing appendages crop up. The endophyte restricts the blood flow to the extremities, extreme cold causes them to freeze and be sloughed off. The stockpiled fescue is probably the healthiest of the toxic endophyte infected, after the first freeze the endophyte is decreased.

http://muextension.missouri.edu/xplor/a ... i/beef.htm

can help out a lot with your concerns. I can only speak from my experience and observations of others, the U of MO has done tons of research on the subject.

dun
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Postby mdmdogs3 » Thu Mar 09, 2006 12:25 am

Ice storms are entertaining things - a light icing is probably the most beautiful thing you can see when the sun comes out the next day - everything looks as though it were created by Waterford.
a heavy icing then is UGLY - trees are what take the brunt of the damage - they just can't support the weight - and electrical lines - they fall down too - (generator :) )

Brush - not that bad of a problem -
my parents moved here 15 years ago - a wooded area couldn't even be walked across - they fenced the perimeter - put in some goats (sold them (4 yrs ago - they hated em :roll: ) but you can still see across the woods to watch the deer and wildlife.

Tornado - Arkansas/Missouri is right on the edge of "tornado alley" so you do have to be aware - but not scared. Just buy a good weather radio - get or locate a storm shelter you can go to - they are very good at predicting storms now - when they say seek shelter - do it - (also - (IMO) less damage is done (overall) by a tornado than by bad wind storms)
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Postby AAOK » Thu Mar 09, 2006 2:12 pm

Cowchaser,
Let me put in a plug for Oklahoma. If you don't like the weather, hang around 'til tomorrow. It could be completely different. Did you know that Oklahoma is one of only four States that have over 10 distinct Ecosystems? More miles of shoreline than the East and West coast combined?

Added Plus: Land is CHEAP compared to National Averages.
More: We have the Cowboys and the Sooners, Carrie Underwood, and more astronauts than any other state.

http://www.okcommerce.gov/index.php?opt ... Itemid=412
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