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Wasup, everybody!

Posted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 5:03 pm
by starrman
I am new to this web site. I am buying a ranch in Oregon and going to be raising beef for sale. Any suggestions would be great.

I will be aided by my parents who have knowledge of the industry, but I am as green as a lime, but it is something I have wanted to do for a long time.

I am not to proud to accept any advice you wizened veterens would offer.

We are looking at raising a Simmental/Angus cross.

Anyway, just wanted to introduce myself.

Posted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 6:13 pm
by andybob
Welcome to the forum,brows the old posts then you can ask specific questions pertaining to your operation.
Simmentaler/Angus is a good choice for the present market.
All the best, Andy.

New Ranch

Posted: Wed Mar 22, 2006 3:17 pm
by K-SHIRES
Starrman- A fellow can learn much here. Been farming many years but learn more all the time. As far as starting out new, I would tell you to avoid The heavy metal disease. That's something you can catch, not the cattle. That's where you get enamored with new, big machinery and put too much money into it. Put your resources into developing cattle and good feed for them. Get by with least machinery you can untill you are up and running. Good luck Pardner.

Posted: Thu Mar 23, 2006 9:45 pm
by starrman
Thank you for your suggestions. I know looking at those John Deere Tractors and implements already has me swooning. Thanks for the warning of that dreaded disease.

Re: Wasup, everybody!

Posted: Fri Mar 24, 2006 12:28 am
by K-SHIRES
starrman wrote:I am new to this web site. I am buying a ranch in Oregon and going to be raising beef for sale. Any suggestions would be great.

I will be aided by my parents who have knowledge of the industry, but I am as green as a lime, but it is something I have wanted to do for a long time.

I am not to proud to accept any advice you wizened veterens would offer.

We are looking at raising a Simmental/Angus cross.

Anyway, just wanted to introduce myself.

***Starrman- Just how geen as a lime do you mean? Reason I ask is your choice of cattle. Do you have experience calving out beef heifers yet? If you have calved beef or dairy cattle on your own B4, I'd say fine and proceed. If not (at the risk of bringin' down the wrath of all the good folks on the board who breed simmentals) , I'd SUGGEST an alternate strategy. How about you start with pure Angus cows bred to Angus, go thru a year and get some experience, then go on and breed cows to Simmental for the following go-round. You'd end up with the cattle you desire, just maybe a Safer way to acheive your goal both financially and stress-wise. Have known a few life-long cattle guys in our area who switched to Simmental, and quite frankly, they had a rough go of it. They dragged out a lot of dead heifers. These wer'nt rookies, these were good cattle folks who watched cattle closely at calving and did most everything right. I reckon it's for you to decide. Now I'll sit back and get chewed on for my suggestion, LOL.

Posted: Fri Mar 24, 2006 11:55 am
by Howdyjabo
"The heavy metal disease. That's something you can catch, not the cattle. That's where you get enamored with new, big machinery and put too much money into it."

I LOVE that!!--- can I cross post it to another group that would appreciate it.

HMD

Posted: Fri Mar 24, 2006 2:01 pm
by K-SHIRES
Cross-post away Karen. Seen too many families lose a life's dream and Granpa's life work not too share a caution. I walked the line a time or two m'self. Now we farm with old horses with new hearts put in'em and we put new shoes on 'em from time to time. Less stress, more profit.

Re: Wasup, everybody!

Posted: Fri Mar 24, 2006 8:21 pm
by starrman
K-SHIRES wrote:
starrman wrote:I am new to this web site. I am buying a ranch in Oregon and going to be raising beef for sale. Any suggestions would be great.

I will be aided by my parents who have knowledge of the industry, but I am as green as a lime, but it is something I have wanted to do for a long time.

I am not to proud to accept any advice you wizened veterens would offer.

We are looking at raising a Simmental/Angus cross.

Anyway, just wanted to introduce myself.

***Starrman- Just how geen as a lime do you mean? Reason I ask is your choice of cattle. Do you have experience calving out beef heifers yet? If you have calved beef or dairy cattle on your own B4, I'd say fine and proceed. If not (at the risk of bringin' down the wrath of all the good folks on the board who breed simmentals) , I'd SUGGEST an alternate strategy. How about you start with pure Angus cows bred to Angus, go thru a year and get some experience, then go on and breed cows to Simmental for the following go-round. You'd end up with the cattle you desire, just maybe a Safer way to acheive your goal both financially and stress-wise. Have known a few life-long cattle guys in our area who switched to Simmental, and quite frankly, they had a rough go of it. They dragged out a lot of dead heifers. These wer'nt rookies, these were good cattle folks who watched cattle closely at calving and did most everything right. I reckon it's for you to decide. Now I'll sit back and get chewed on for my suggestion, LOL.


Actually, I was going to use Simmental cows and use Angus bulls. I have a friend who does that and he thinks that it works great. I would love to hear the pros and cons on that idea, though. I really would. Thanks for the comment.

Posted: Fri Mar 24, 2006 9:25 pm
by Susie David
Welcome....the best advise that I could offer my own grand kids is to get a mentor, learn about the animals, spend some time working around cattle and then decide what direction you want to go. Out of five only two have the desire to be 4-H kids and they don't miss a chance to help with any chore from claving to slaughter.
Thought #1. Knowledge and direction...a business plan will save you alot of misdirection
Thought #2. Facilities first...then cattle. Nothing like finding your cows having a midday snack in your neighbor's wheat field good fences really do make good neighbors. Or learning the hard way that a chute comes in real handy when you discover that cows really don't like to get vaccinations or palpated...of course we have a cow that I'm wondering about.
Any...sorry about getting long winded but there have been alot of posts on the subject and advise given that is worth more than a guy could afford...do a search and have a good read.
Good luck to you DMc

Posted: Sat Mar 25, 2006 1:48 am
by starrman
Susie David wrote:Welcome....the best advise that I could offer my own grand kids is to get a mentor, learn about the animals, spend some time working around cattle and then decide what direction you want to go. Out of five only two have the desire to be 4-H kids and they don't miss a chance to help with any chore from claving to slaughter.
Thought #1. Knowledge and direction...a business plan will save you alot of misdirection
Thought #2. Facilities first...then cattle. Nothing like finding your cows having a midday snack in your neighbor's wheat field good fences really do make good neighbors. Or learning the hard way that a chute comes in real handy when you discover that cows really don't like to get vaccinations or palpated...of course we have a cow that I'm wondering about.
Any...sorry about getting long winded but there have been alot of posts on the subject and advise given that is worth more than a guy could afford...do a search and have a good read.
Good luck to you DMc


Hey, no problem at all, that is why I posted. I want all the advise I can get. Even looking at this message board, there is so much to take in. Knowing a good starting point is great. Mentorship is extremely valuable. So, thank you very much for your input.