Fruit trees

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rnh2
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Fruit trees

Postby rnh2 » Tue Jun 14, 2016 7:54 pm

I want to plant some fruit trees. I want to plant the three in one type. Are these self pollinating? Or do I need to plant in pairs?
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regolith
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Re: Fruit trees

Postby regolith » Fri Jun 17, 2016 5:55 am

grafted varieties are usually pollinators of each other, so provided all varieties are thriving they shouldn't need multiple trees.
You can go on-line and google the varieties you're purchasing to check what the most suitable pollinators are, that way you'll know for sure that they're compatible.
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cow pollinater
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Re: Fruit trees

Postby cow pollinater » Fri Jun 17, 2016 11:04 am

What type of fruit? A lot of fruit is self pollinating at least to some extent and most of the three in one offerings I've seen use compatible varieties. In my experience cherries and apples are the two where you'll really want to pay attention to pollinator variety but that can vary some as every variety acts a little different in different areas of the country.
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Ebenezer
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Re: Fruit trees

Postby Ebenezer » Tue Jun 21, 2016 6:52 am

Just opinions: Find someone fairly close to you who has the fruit that you are talking about and ask about varieties that are the best fit. My guess is that you are talking about apples but maybe not. All that is written about good fit and disease resistance is not 100% and varied in the local environment. Even the old heirloom varieties have environmental limits that you don't know about until you try them. Point - you will not be able to select 3 or X number of varieties on these grafted trees that really work in your area.

Deer? The trees come fairly small. If variety 1 and 2 are on lower limbs and you have deer pressure those limbs are going to be worthless to you unless you fence for deer control. Otherwise the lowest fruit you ever pick will be at about 4' high. I have multiple species on trees but I grafted into larger trees for either keeping new varieties around to watch or needed to take out a tree and wanted to save the variety here.

Heirloom varieties: Some are great and there are reasons why many are not grown today. They were from given environments and I have found many to be unable to live here because of that. But when you find the ones that work - BINGO! It just takes trial, time and willingness to cull.

Recommendation: Same folks who help you locally on varieties - ask them about the best semi-dwarf rootstocks for your soil and disease pressure. Get two or three of the best varieties for your area on their own rootstock and train the trees to be normal in whatever pattern of scaffold limbs you want. Top them when they get too tall for your safety or your ladder. If you have no one to ask there is info on rootstocks, soil types, ... but it takes more time. If no one to ask, don't try varieties from colder climates if that is where they thrive, were discovered or were grown historically. Soft fruits, like peaches, plums, ... - the commercial growers have better fungicides, insecticides and "stuff" that you will use. Same deal: find species that have some resistance if you can.
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