Storing Vegetables

From the latest tomato tips to sweetcorn calamities, share your experiences in the garden.
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Hutch
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Storing Vegetables

Postby Hutch » Sat Jan 28, 2006 5:51 pm

I would like to here some of the old time methods for storing you vegetables. I can just barely remember my Grandma digging up cabbage in the winter time. Not sure how she prepared it, I think she had other veggies buried. Can anyone share any old time methods?
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Crowderfarms
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Re: Storing Vegetables

Postby Crowderfarms » Sat Jan 28, 2006 7:08 pm

Hutch wrote:I would like to here some of the old time methods for storing you vegetables. I can just barely remember my Grandma digging up cabbage in the winter time. Not sure how she prepared it, I think she had other veggies buried. Can anyone share any old time methods?
Lots of people used to have 'Root Cellars' they kept their vegetables like Potatoes and Onions in them.
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D.R. Cattle
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Postby D.R. Cattle » Sat Jan 28, 2006 7:08 pm

Mason jars and a pressure canner.
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dj
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Postby dj » Tue Jan 31, 2006 8:23 am

blanch and freeze
sugar and freeze
freeze
No more cooking and canning here.
Taters,apples, and pears are put in wire racks cushioned with loose hay in the cellar
(an old set of bread racks works great)

I guess the old way would be to dry everything
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TLCfromARK
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Re: Storing Vegetables

Postby TLCfromARK » Wed Feb 01, 2006 1:12 am

Hutch wrote:I would like to here some of the old time methods for storing you vegetables. I can just barely remember my Grandma digging up cabbage in the winter time. Not sure how she prepared it, I think she had other veggies buried. Can anyone share any old time methods?


I remember my grandfather storing taters & onions in old barn with wooden floors. He would spread hay pretty thick on the floor and scatter the taters in one place & the onions in another making sure none were touching each other. Then he'd cover the whole thing with more loose hay. I remember being sent out the the old barn with a bucket to get veggies for my grandmother in the middle of winter. Seems like they stayed good even in really cold weather.

Also they would air dry apples, pears, peaches, etc. for making pies. The would can every thing else, corn, squash, beans, etc.
;-)
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Postby Scotty » Wed Feb 01, 2006 7:47 am

D.R. Cattle wrote:Mason jars and a pressure canner.


The best way for me. Now that I have that fish fryer I can do it outside.


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Just_a_girl
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Postby Just_a_girl » Sat Feb 04, 2006 11:15 pm

D.R. Cattle wrote:Mason jars and a pressure canner.



My grandmother in Texas would put just about everything she could in mason jars and store in the storm cellar on their farm. She would hang the onions, and lay potatoes on and under straw.

My grandmother in Belgium sealed all jars with melted wax and wax paper. My aunt in Belgium stores in a cellar under the barn, which is under the house.
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Postby Bullbuyer » Tue Feb 14, 2006 9:42 am

Hutch -
Up here in the Mountains of WV a lot of old folks would store veggies the way you are talking. Find a high spot in the garden (or make one) so that standing water isn't a problem. Lay down several inches of straw or old hay in a circle (your finished product will look like a Native American burial mound). You can store potatoes, carrots, cabbage, turnips, - most any root vegetable -simply by making them into a mound, cover several inches deep with straw or old hay and then a layer of dirt - again several inches thick. Most of the time the family made two or three of these mounds and apparently they work quiet well. The other alternative is a dark root cellar which was usually a cheaply constructed buiding which uses the hillside as it's back wall.
Just a few things I've seen.
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