Shroom Garden

From the latest tomato tips to sweetcorn calamities, share your experiences in the garden.
User avatar
Jogeephus
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 23310
Joined: Mon Jul 17, 2006 9:44 pm
Location: South Georgia

Re: Shroom Garden

Postby Jogeephus » Sat Jan 19, 2013 9:22 am

I hope they are certified organic.. :mrgreen: :lol2: :lol2: :lol2:
0 x
Experience - the ability to instantly recognize a mistake when you make it again.

User avatar
skyhightree1
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 17630
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 12:11 am
Location: Free Rent ,VA

Re: Shroom Garden

Postby skyhightree1 » Sat Jan 19, 2013 11:27 am

LOL...
0 x
Oh Great Spirit, who made all races,look kindly upon the whole human family and take away the arrogance and hatred which separates us from our brothers.

hurleyjd
GURU
GURU
Posts: 3061
Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 9:52 am
Location: Yantis, Texas

Re: Shroom Garden

Postby hurleyjd » Sun Jan 20, 2013 9:25 am

I have read this with great interest. One question what is the time frame that the mushrooms are in good shape and ready to eat. Do you remove the to mature ones and hope for the next crop. I know that mushroms seem to pop up in the pastures and places nearly overnight. Is this the case with the be nice. Are you planning to dry any of them for future use or are there any other way to perserve for future use.
0 x

User avatar
Jogeephus
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 23310
Joined: Mon Jul 17, 2006 9:44 pm
Location: South Georgia

Re: Shroom Garden

Postby Jogeephus » Sun Jan 20, 2013 10:50 am

Hurley, the shiitakes take time to grow like a tomato ripening so while they do pop out overnight they take maybe a week to get to optimal size. Depending on the variety they will bear at different times of the year. It is a bit of trouble at first because you need to inoculate the logs when the sap is down and then keep them in a shady moist place for eight months to a year to let the mycellium fill the log. After the log is saturated you can harvest mushrooms for 3-6 years. When they come in, like a garden, you will have more than you can deal with but you can dry them or freeze them. Drying is best.

What I do is inoculate a few logs each winter. This way I'll have a constant supply in the future. The best logs to inoculate are young fast growing oaks (white is best) but red oak, sweetgum are good too. You want as much sapwood as possible. (I'm experimenting with blackgum this year) Oaks have more heartwood than diffuse porous trees like gum but diffuse porous trees like gum will dry out faster than oak and they will decompose quicker than oak (accelerated yield in right conditions) so its a trade off given your own particular situation. You want the bolt to be about 4-6" to give the quickest yield. Larger bolts will take longer to bare but they will also last longer - sortof common sense on all that.

I just planted another bunch last week. How I did it was to cut some oak and gums about 5-6' long and drilled holes in the log. The holes need to be about 1.5" apart in the drill and the rows about 6-10" apart. You also want to try and alternate the holes in each row so a diamond patern forms. (I actually plant the rows closer thinking this will hasten the colonization of the logs)

This photo shows the bit I use and the depth. About 1.5"

Image

I purchase a mushroom kit which is sawdust, tea leaves and grain that is full of mycorhizae and ready to bear mushrooms in it. I then rob this sawdust and push it into the drilled holes. I use a plugger but you can use your fingers if you don't have a plugger. Oh, and if you use something like this don't be concerned about only getting the white in the hole cause the sawdust is saturated with the mycorhizae.
Plugging holes.
Image

Sealed holes
Image

I then take a cheap crock pot and melt some honey comb in this. It needn't be hot just at the melting point I seal off all the holes.

Image

If you care to learn from my previous mistakes, I would suggest stacking the logs in the shade near a water source and covering them with shade cloth to keep the wind down and sunlight to a minimum. Originally I didn't do this, and planted them in the woods like fence posts thinking I'd go the natural route. Unfortunately, like a garden, I paid for it when a drought came. You don't want the logs to dry out cause this could kill the shiitake or make the logs more vulnerable for native fungi - and screw your yield up considerably cause like a garden - when it needs water IT NEEDS WATER.

What I'm doing this year is stacking them like a log cabin on the north side of the barn and have tossed a piece of shade cloth over the pile.

I don't mean to give you the impression they need babysitting cause they don't. Its just when it gets hot and dry the occassional spraying of water (when you think about it) will make the difference between a bumper crop or not. Other than that, they are pretty much care free but when they begin to bud out of the tree its a good idea to insure they get the equivalent of 2" of water every two days to get the largest fruit and keep them from getting tough.

This is really no inconvenience because when they are fruiting you will be wanting to check on them every day or so just like you do your tomatoes cause as long as the conditions are right they will continue to bear.

There are different ways to do it and this is just the way I do it but I think if you'd do something similar along these lines and use some common sense you will find they are pretty easy to grow and you'll have a constant supply of mushrooms for your steaks.
0 x
Experience - the ability to instantly recognize a mistake when you make it again.

hurleyjd
GURU
GURU
Posts: 3061
Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 9:52 am
Location: Yantis, Texas

Re: Shroom Garden

Postby hurleyjd » Sun Jan 20, 2013 10:42 pm

Where did you get the special drill bit you show there Jo
0 x

User avatar
Jogeephus
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 23310
Joined: Mon Jul 17, 2006 9:44 pm
Location: South Georgia

Re: Shroom Garden

Postby Jogeephus » Mon Jan 21, 2013 7:43 am

You don't have to use those but they are easier. Here is where you can find them and all sorts of other stuff.

http://shop.sharondalefarm.com/category.sc?categoryId=4
0 x
Experience - the ability to instantly recognize a mistake when you make it again.


Return to “Gardening”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests