Dairy Farming

For the dairy folks and/or beef folks with questions about udders, milk and mastitis.
Supp
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Mar 19, 2006 11:43 pm
Location: New Zealand

Postby Supp » Wed Mar 22, 2006 1:42 pm

Thanks for your post, Linda. I hope you have the quote thingy sorted now :)

I'm 43 years old, and only went into dairy at 30, after working mainly in the investments arena beforehand.

Wages here vary.....larger herd farms (over 500 ish) generally pay better money than smaller herd farms, although there are benefits in smaller herd work.....as an employee, you get to do all the jobs, and hence learn your craft.

Smaller herds are generally 'mum and dad' farms, run by owner-operators, with a younger assistant. If the owner has high/equity-low/costs, they may employ a married couple, or a 50% sharemliker, who owns the herd and equipment. 50% jobs are common here, it is a stepping stone to farm ownership. A farm worker would earn 20-30,000, a married couple 25-40,000 and then the 'share' system cuts in.....generally 21% with some costs, up to 50% with half of all costs except capital improvement and fertilisers.

Larger herds generally follow the same lines, but there are also herd manager and farm management options.
Young staff generally quickly become herd managers, earning 35-50,000. Managers earn up to 100,000 for larger herds. These positions are simply wages....no costs involved.
Many larger farms also employ "Contract workers" who earn around 21% of the income, with some costs (especially labour, rubberware and detergents, and electric).

Hours worked here are usually in the vicinity of 4.00am to 6.00pm, with two one hour breaks. A person on wages usually works 11 days, and then has 3 days off. Three weeks annual leave is statutory.


[/u]
0 x

User avatar
milkmaid
GURU
GURU
Posts: 5290
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 12:34 pm
Location: Idaho

Postby milkmaid » Wed Mar 22, 2006 3:09 pm

As far as dairy sizes go...there's one not that far from here running 3,000 head...I was told 50 to a side. Having a little trouble contemplating that one size. :lol:

Jerry/Linda...can I ask a few more questions? ;-)

AI or herd bulls? on both the milking herd and heifer herd? (And along those lines - if you AI, can I ask a few questions about some of the numbers and letters listed by each bull - I've been looking through the Select Sires catalog and can figure out most of them but not all. I have several cows that I'd like to have AI'd in the next few months.)

Vaccinations? what type of program do you use for the milking herd and your young stock? I was speaking with someone recently who works for that 3,000 cow dairy (trimming hooves) and he stated that they have to vaccinate for about everything under the sun. Due to the number of cows. Said they're vaccinated at dry off, fresh, early, mid and late lactation...wow. LOL. Sounds a bit extreme, but perhaps necessary when you're moving that many animals in and out.

Records - any preferences on record programs? born2run and I have been discussing that one a bit. Stockeeper? Dairy Comp?

Thanks again ;-)
0 x
Basics needed to answer questions: age, weight, breed, sex. # affected vs # in group, feed type/amount, prior vaccinations, deworming, antibiotics, any recent changes....

More info = better answers.

J and L
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 84
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 10:26 pm
Location: Wis

Postby J and L » Wed Mar 22, 2006 3:12 pm

Milkmaid, Nice cows/calves!
I never made it to Twin Falls a couple of weeks ago. The person that I would have been traveling from Billings had gotten bit by a dog prior to leaving Indiana and never made the trip. Too much driving to do alone. So a friend and I are making the trip from here next week. What is the weather going to be the end of next week in ID?
Jerry
0 x

J and L
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 84
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 10:26 pm
Location: Wis

Postby J and L » Wed Mar 22, 2006 5:11 pm

The dairy herd and the hiefers are nearly completely AI. We have a bull that we use on a few cows that prove hard to breed or find in heat. We have a freemartin hiefer in each pen that has been treeted hormonaly for use as a gomer. There is a point when it is much more important to get a cow pregnant than the loss of genetic improvment. On cows, we AI twice with mated bulls then once with young sires and then to a bull. Hiefers are pretty easy to settle if you have a facility to work with them. Once confirmed pregnant we like to have them with a young bull just to take care of any loss of pregnancy.
Jerry
0 x

J and L
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 84
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 10:26 pm
Location: Wis

Postby J and L » Thu Mar 23, 2006 10:50 am

milkmaid,
Cow records, We use Dairycomp 305 and are not real fammiliar with some of the others. Dairycomp is widely accepted in the industry and therefore integrates well with other vendors (Vet,Nutritionist,Bull Studs,DHI, etc) Reoprts from this program are nearly unlimited.
I will attatch Vac info to an e-mail
Jerry
0 x

User avatar
born2run
Trail Boss
Trail Boss
Posts: 463
Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2005 1:47 pm
Location: NW Wisconsin
Contact:

Postby born2run » Thu Mar 23, 2006 12:47 pm

Jerry...

I've only seen printouts of DHI records using Dairy Comp. Herd Pro's StocKeeper is what I use at work, and I've become famaliar with it enough to really like it.
0 x
The world is like a mirror. Smile at it and it will smile back.

J and L
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 84
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 10:26 pm
Location: Wis

Postby J and L » Thu Mar 23, 2006 1:15 pm

Born2run,
What's really important is that you can get the info that YOU need, and that it is convienent to use. It is a lot of work to learn some of these programs to the point were they are handy. "If it isn't broke don't fix it". Again we are not really familiar with other programs.
Jerry
0 x

User avatar
born2run
Trail Boss
Trail Boss
Posts: 463
Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2005 1:47 pm
Location: NW Wisconsin
Contact:

Postby born2run » Thu Mar 23, 2006 1:18 pm

Yep, valid point. :) I know a lot of other dairies use Dairy Comp 305. From what I've seen of it I'm sure I could adapt.
0 x
The world is like a mirror. Smile at it and it will smile back.

User avatar
milkmaid
GURU
GURU
Posts: 5290
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 12:34 pm
Location: Idaho

Postby milkmaid » Thu Mar 23, 2006 10:09 pm

J and L wrote:Milkmaid, Nice cows/calves!
I never made it to Twin Falls a couple of weeks ago. The person that I would have been traveling from Billings had gotten bit by a dog prior to leaving Indiana and never made the trip. Too much driving to do alone. So a friend and I are making the trip from here next week. What is the weather going to be the end of next week in ID?
Jerry


Thanks :)

Not that I trust the weather reports, LOL, but my opinion on the weather is that it'll be mild through next week. We had quite the bout of crazy weather; snowing one day, hot the next. But it appears to be evening out now; roads are dry, occasional 1-inch-or-less, snow "showers", relatively clear skies - my guess is that this will hold up through next week. You should have clear driving.
0 x
Basics needed to answer questions: age, weight, breed, sex. # affected vs # in group, feed type/amount, prior vaccinations, deworming, antibiotics, any recent changes....

More info = better answers.

J and L
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 84
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 10:26 pm
Location: Wis

Postby J and L » Thu Mar 23, 2006 10:44 pm

Thanks for the weather report. We will be driving from Salt Lake City. Did you get the vaccination info? Any more Questions?
Jerry
0 x

User avatar
milkmaid
GURU
GURU
Posts: 5290
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 12:34 pm
Location: Idaho

Postby milkmaid » Thu Mar 23, 2006 10:58 pm

I did get the vaccination info - thanks! I did have some questions on the vaccs...will get to that next. First thing on my mind is AI sires. :lol:

I have a few cows to breed in the near future...main one that I'm interested in a good bull for is this one. This is my 311 cow. (Others I'll breed and either sell as springers or sell the calf as a springer; but this cow's calf could be staying a lot longer than that.)

(3 days prior to calving)
Image

(after calving)
Image

3rd or 4th lactation cow. I raised calves on her all last year; one of the culls I rehabilitated. Right now she's fresh, running with boss's herd. She was doing about 90lbs/day at a week in milk, and I can't have a nurse cow doing that much. LOL.

I'm looking for a reliable (90%+) bull that will give a little more udder width. Low SCS (I've treated this cow for mastitis 5 times within the last year, diff quarters each time, and she's back on antibiotics right now). Bull that throws daughters with excellent feet and legs. Same on Dairy Form. Those are the main things in my book.

Increase on udder depth is optional (but not negative depth; no shallow udders!), and no need for an increase in stature (she's about 1400lbs and that's just right in my book). This cow calves easily and has bred back first service last two pregnancies I remember, so I want to keep the calving ease and fertility...and an increase in milk is OK, I just don't think I need +2370lbs. LOL.

And I'll put it this way; price isn't really a question on this cow. Whatever bull is best for her.

I've been looking through the Select Sires directory as we do have a SS rep that comes through the area on a regular basis and one of those bulls would be easiest.

Any thoughts on bulls? anything you'd suggest?

Also, I think what I need a "bit" of help on too is understanding the numbers here. Most of them make perfect sense to me, but not all. LOL. Can you help?

DPR - daughters pregnancy rates? And positive numbers are better...higher the better?

Calving ease - %DBH - percent difficult births heifers? So lower numbers here are better, right?

Now how about the "Standard Transmitting Abilities"?

Catagories are...
Stature
Dairy Form
Strength
Body Depth
Rump Width
Rump Angle
Legs Side View
Legs Rear View
Foot Angle
Feet & Legs Score
Fore Attachment
Rear Udder Height
Rear Udder Width
Udder Cleft
Udder Depth
Front Teat Place
Front Teat Length

Scoring goes from a -2 to a +2. Is it best to have positive numbers on EVERYTHING? And how does this scoring system go? For instance - Stature. -2 equals "short", +2 equals "tall" - ??? How about feet and legs score? how's that one work?

Any help here is greatly appreciated. :lol: :P ;-)
0 x
Basics needed to answer questions: age, weight, breed, sex. # affected vs # in group, feed type/amount, prior vaccinations, deworming, antibiotics, any recent changes....

More info = better answers.

K-SHIRES
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 96
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 7:12 am
Location: N.WI,USA

Breeding 311 etc.

Postby K-SHIRES » Fri Mar 24, 2006 1:52 am

milkmaid wrote:I did get the vaccination info - thanks! I did have some questions on the vaccs...will get to that next. First thing on my mind is AI sires. :lol:

I have a few cows to breed in the near future...main one that I'm interested in a good bull for is this one. This is my 311 cow. (Others I'll breed and either sell as springers or sell the calf as a springer; but this cow's calf could be staying a lot longer than that.)

(3 days prior to calving)
Image

(after calving)
Image

3rd or 4th lactation cow. I raised calves on her all last year; one of the culls I rehabilitated. Right now she's fresh, running with boss's herd. She was doing about 90lbs/day at a week in milk, and I can't have a nurse cow doing that much. LOL.

I'm looking for a reliable (90%+) bull that will give a little more udder width. Low SCS (I've treated this cow for mastitis 5 times within the last year, diff quarters each time, and she's back on antibiotics right now). Bull that throws daughters with excellent feet and legs. Same on Dairy Form. Those are the main things in my book.

Increase on udder depth is optional (but not negative depth; no shallow udders!), and no need for an increase in stature (she's about 1400lbs and that's just right in my book). This cow calves easily and has bred back first service last two pregnancies I remember, so I want to keep the calving ease and fertility...and an increase in milk is OK, I just don't think I need +2370lbs. LOL.

And I'll put it this way; price isn't really a question on this cow. Whatever bull is best for her.

I've been looking through the Select Sires directory as we do have a SS rep that comes through the area on a regular basis and one of those bulls would be easiest.

Any thoughts on bulls? anything you'd suggest?

Also, I think what I need a "bit" of help on too is understanding the numbers here. Most of them make perfect sense to me, but not all. LOL. Can you help?

DPR - daughters pregnancy rates? And positive numbers are better...higher the better?

Calving ease - %DBH - percent difficult births heifers? So lower numbers here are better, right?

Now how about the "Standard Transmitting Abilities"?

Catagories are...
Stature
Dairy Form
Strength
Body Depth
Rump Width
Rump Angle
Legs Side View
Legs Rear View
Foot Angle
Feet & Legs Score
Fore Attachment
Rear Udder Height
Rear Udder Width
Udder Cleft
Udder Depth
Front Teat Place
Front Teat Length

Scoring goes from a -2 to a +2. Is it best to have positive numbers on EVERYTHING? And how does this scoring system go? For instance - Stature. -2 equals "short", +2 equals "tall" - ??? How about feet and legs score? how's that one work?

Any help here is greatly appreciated. :lol: :P ;-)


Howdy, I'm goin' out on a limb here and reccommend you breed 311 to 7h7004 Damion. If he is not available, would use 7h6758 Mr. Sam. Looking at picture, 311 could use a little more body depth and sweep of rib. The pic may deceive me, but i think her rear legs tend to sweep a little to the forwaard(Sickle) not bad, mind you-she's a strong cow, but this is why I would use Damion over Mr. Sam. Mr. Sam would accentuate or maintain sickle set to leg, whereas Damion would move rear legs towards posty just a bit. Both bulls would give her just a wee bit stronger center rear udder ligament support, but Damion does it better.
*It is not best to have positve numbers on everything. For example, on Front teat length, Damion show +.42, which means longer front teat. Wheras, if you look at the bull RSVP (7H6960) you will see -.24 which means shorter front teats. Most modern dairy cows short teats better- less chance of getting stepped on or injured. Your 311 was good enough that didn't need to zero in on teat lenght as an area of improvement. Anyways, best to look at cow for most obvius areas you want to improve, pick bull that "fixes" for next generation without any glaring deficiencies in his linear proof, and use accordingly.
A good way to pick bulls is to look at the Linear chart(the ones with the little black bars) They will make more sense on balance than all those numbers you can't remember anyways.
A good rule of thumb is, the more black bars to the right of center on linear, the better the bull.
As I always say, don't confuse me with the facts! If I am wrong on your 311, keep in mind I'm sitting over 1,000 miles away looking at a picture! Hope this helps.
0 x
The family that hays together stays together.

K-SHIRES
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 96
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 7:12 am
Location: N.WI,USA

germania parlor?

Postby K-SHIRES » Fri Mar 24, 2006 11:00 am

J and L wrote:Currently milking in a double 6 built 11 years ago along with 275 frestalls. So youse it is a tight fit right know. the knew one will be a germania double 12 expandable to 16 with a direct load to tankers. Do you have a preference for a harringbone over parallel?
Jerry

J&L - I am late to discussion as y'all came buckin' out of chute so fast that i got left in dust. As you are talking Germania, did you have the opportunity to talk to a Mr. Rolf Riesgies of Rhinelander WI?. Reason I mention, he has many parlors which he re-manufactures at his biz there. A very knowledgable resource on Germania -He built and owned Germania. Sold company, now buys, re-mans and sells parlors of all sizes.
You have probably allready explored this, if so please disregard my suggestion. If not his E-Mail is Gdavps@aol.com He's brilliant on parlors if you run into any snags.
0 x
The family that hays together stays together.

K-SHIRES
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 96
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 7:12 am
Location: N.WI,USA

HB vs. Parallel

Postby K-SHIRES » Fri Mar 24, 2006 11:33 am

J&L- Two thoughts on parlors - We are moving into a herringbone because: We have various size cows ranging from 1500 lb. Holstiens to 1000 lb. New Zealand Ayrshires. A smaller cow can scoot forward in parallel, and your arms just are'nt long enough even when chest is pressed against pipes. Also, old cows won't adapt, as Texas dairyman pointed out. Also, cows turning a sharp right angle can blow out their hocks. this even applies to run lanes to holding area. All of ours wiil be curves or wide sweeping corners. Just our thoughts on the matter. K-SHIRES.
0 x
The family that hays together stays together.

J and L
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 84
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 10:26 pm
Location: Wis

Postby J and L » Fri Mar 24, 2006 11:52 am

Thanks for Rolf's e-mail. There was an article about his new venture in one of the farm papers last spring. I did every kind of internet search I could think of and couldn't find a new business name or #. Rolf does know his stuff. A friend of ours sold for Germania in 90-95? and we were able to tour the manufacturing facility, etc and had a couple of intereting talks with Rolf. I will contact him and see what he has to say. Germania in in a class of its own when it comes to parlor design, etc. We are flying this friend from Denver to Salt Lake to join Jerry in viewing the used parlor.

Thanks too for helping with the "choose a sire" question. While Jerry, the herdsman and I do the arm work we depend alot on the mating service from Accelerated. Neither of us has much experience in the registered world...
Linda
0 x


Return to “Got Milk?”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest