Foster cow problem

For the dairy folks and/or beef folks with questions about udders, milk and mastitis.
charlie01
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Foster cow problem

Postby charlie01 » Sat Nov 23, 2013 7:00 am

Recently purchased a diary cow and it's calf to act as a foster mum for these 2 other calfs. However, the foster cows, calf died most likely due to a snake bite. She now kicks the other 2 away. I can get her to stand still but only when I give her hay and lock them up together.
Anyone have any tips on how to get the cow to bond with the 2 calves so that she can let them suckle.

She's a jersey and has tonnes of milk.
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bigbull338
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Re: Foster cow problem

Postby bigbull338 » Sat Nov 23, 2013 6:58 pm

if you have a squeeze chute you can put her in that an squeeze her anlet the sides down so the calves can suck.that is time consuming but it will work if you work with her.
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debbielincoln
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Re: Foster cow problem

Postby debbielincoln » Tue Feb 11, 2014 7:58 pm

I am new here, but I have experience with fostering onto a reluctant momma cow.
I got a real good deal on a cow 3 years ago because she would NOT take fosters. I took her anyway.
I leave her in a pen with the foster making sure it's big enough that she cannot harm him. THe pen has a head catch which I use 2 to 3 times a day and show the foster how to nurse from the rear. I also found out that she prefers solid black calves and not red or red and whites.
I have found that eventually (in two weeks) she will accept him/her. Her udder gets so full that she is looking for relief. BY week-three they are bonded and all are happy.
The first week may need close monitoring to prevent harm to calf.
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shortybreeder
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Re: Foster cow problem

Postby shortybreeder » Wed Feb 12, 2014 10:23 am

debbielincoln wrote:I am new here, but I have experience with fostering onto a reluctant momma cow.
I got a real good deal on a cow 3 years ago because she would NOT take fosters. I took her anyway.
I leave her in a pen with the foster making sure it's big enough that she cannot harm him. THe pen has a head catch which I use 2 to 3 times a day and show the foster how to nurse from the rear. I also found out that she prefers solid black calves and not red or red and whites.
I have found that eventually (in two weeks) she will accept him/her. Her udder gets so full that she is looking for relief. BY week-three they are bonded and all are happy.
The first week may need close monitoring to prevent harm to calf.

:lol2: Sorry, but I think that is hilarious because we have a pygmy goat that seems to have an eye for color as well... Whenever we bring a new baby calf and mom into the barn, she has to come up and check on it (she has free roam of the entire farm) and if it is a solid black, or almost solid black, she just gets violent and attacks relentlessly. She goes on her hind legs and beats on that calf until we can get over to them and seperate them. We also had a pair of black calves that we kept in an alley-like pen in the barn, and occasionally my grandma would leave the gate open to that pen, but maple (the goat) would stand guard at the entrance and make an awful racket until someone came over and closed the gate... If one of the calves would leave, she would turn around and herd them back into their pen by ramming them until they ran home. She also has the black lab so incredibly "whipped" that he will NOT come into the barn anymore! Yet she used to spend every night sharing a pillow with our lassie dog... We also had a norwegian elk hound that was more obese than any cow ever posted on here, and the only time I have ever seen that dog run was when Maple was chasing her... She is one strange and funny goat!

Sorry for the long story. To answer the original question above, I had a cow that calved the same time as one of my dad's dairy cows calved out a char X heifer so we decided to try and put them together. We did it by keeping a calf coat on the original calf for 24 hours, then transferring the calf coat to the Char calf, and leaving the other calf without a coat (it was a warmer September) and that seemed to work. I've also heard of people skinning the cow's dead calf and putting the skin on the foster calf as a kind of "scented blanket" to get the mom to think the other calf is really hers.
Hope that helps!
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milk
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Re: Foster cow problem

Postby milk » Wed Feb 12, 2014 11:33 am

The rancher next door says to rub some of her birthed calf's poop onto the other calf. This works when the calves are very new.
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Son of Butch
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Re: Foster cow problem

Postby Son of Butch » Thu Feb 13, 2014 5:13 am

It might take penning them together for a couple of weeks.
Hobbles would help with the kicking and if she's very aggressive with head butts you still may need to tie her head at least once a day to allow the calves to 'milk her.'
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