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Re: Old deer rifles

Posted: Sun Nov 12, 2017 10:46 pm
by Jogeephus
True Grit Farms wrote:Image
I'm a dumdazz, the second tower is 585 yards and I give it 10 MOR on my Nightforce scope and let it rip....as long as theres no wind. If theres
a crosswind I won't shoot over 300 yards.


I know another dog named Dumbazz. :lol:

Re: Old deer rifles

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 9:27 am
by Bright Raven
callmefence wrote:
True Grit Farms wrote:Image
I'm a dumdazz, the second tower is 585 yards and I give it 10 MOR on my Nightforce scope and let it rip....as long as theres no wind. If theres
a crosswind I won't shoot over 300 yards.


300 is about my max. And I have to feel really good about it. I prefer under 200.
I've shot a few over 400 back when I was younger and dumber. ;-)
I was a better shot back then to.

I pretty much consider anything I have to hold off the vitals to far. I only shoot mature bucks and doe's. I don't wanna cripple a big buck and I can shoot doe's at 20yards off my porch


I shot long range rifle in Montana at High Ore Range. I used a Cooper Arms, Montana in 6.5 X 284. Ammunition is critical. Handloaded; used almost all Lapua components. I used a co-axial Cartridge Concentricity Gauge on each round, etc. But I rarely had to shoot game over 300 yards. If you need to do that, you are not a hunter, you are a shooter. Having said that, I have no problem with practiced shooters shooting big game at long range because there is equipment that can do it better than most hunters can at 25 yards. In fact, more game is wounded at 50 yards than 500.

Re: Old deer rifles

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:13 am
by callmefence
Bright Raven wrote:
callmefence wrote:
True Grit Farms wrote:Image
I'm a dumdazz, the second tower is 585 yards and I give it 10 MOR on my Nightforce scope and let it rip....as long as theres no wind. If theres
a crosswind I won't shoot over 300 yards.


300 is about my max. And I have to feel really good about it. I prefer under 200.
I've shot a few over 400 back when I was younger and dumber. ;-)
I was a better shot back then to.

I pretty much consider anything I have to hold off the vitals to far. I only shoot mature bucks and doe's. I don't wanna cripple a big buck and I can shoot doe's at 20yards off my porch


I shot long range rifle in Montana at High Ore Range. I used a Cooper Arms, Montana in 6.5 X 284. Ammunition is critical. Handloaded; used almost all Lapua components. I used a co-axial Cartridge Concentricity Gauge on each round, etc. But I rarely had to shoot game over 300 yards. If you need to do that, you are not a hunter, you are a shooter. Having said that, I have no problem with practiced shooters shooting big game at long range because there is equipment that can do it better than most hunters can at 25 yards. In fact, more game is wounded at 50 yards than 500.


Deer are worth more than cattle.with My proximity to ft hood army reservation reservation. I could book hunts every day and get 700.00 for a doe. You gut shoot a good buck you might as well gut shoot a cow same difference.

Deer and cattle are for eating and selling. Pigs are for hail Mary, and spray and pray shooting.

More game is wounded at 50 than 500 yards. Maybe but that's because most people don't shoot that for. It's a :bs:
Comparison. Come on Raven show me the science..... ;-)... :compute:

Re: Old deer rifles

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:27 am
by Bright Raven
callmefence wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
callmefence wrote:
300 is about my max. And I have to feel really good about it. I prefer under 200.
I've shot a few over 400 back when I was younger and dumber. ;-)
I was a better shot back then to.

I pretty much consider anything I have to hold off the vitals to far. I only shoot mature bucks and doe's. I don't wanna cripple a big buck and I can shoot doe's at 20yards off my porch


I shot long range rifle in Montana at High Ore Range. I used a Cooper Arms, Montana in 6.5 X 284. Ammunition is critical. Handloaded; used almost all Lapua components. I used a co-axial Cartridge Concentricity Gauge on each round, etc. But I rarely had to shoot game over 300 yards. If you need to do that, you are not a hunter, you are a shooter. Having said that, I have no problem with practiced shooters shooting big game at long range because there is equipment that can do it better than most hunters can at 25 yards. In fact, more game is wounded at 50 yards than 500.


Deer are worth more than cattle.with My proximity to ft hood army reservation reservation. I could book hunts every day and get 700.00 for a doe. You gut shoot a good buck you might as well gut shoot a cow same difference.

Deer and cattle are for eating and selling. Pigs are for hail Mary, and spray and pray shooting.

More game is wounded at 50 than 500 yards. Maybe but that's because most people don't shoot that for. It's a :bs:
Comparison. Come on Raven show me the science..... ;-)... :compute:


That was the basis for the statement. Shows just how you can make a deceitful TRUTHFUL statement. :lol:

Re: Old deer rifles

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:48 am
by True Grit Farms
Bright Raven wrote:
callmefence wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
I shot long range rifle in Montana at High Ore Range. I used a Cooper Arms, Montana in 6.5 X 284. Ammunition is critical. Handloaded; used almost all Lapua components. I used a co-axial Cartridge Concentricity Gauge on each round, etc. But I rarely had to shoot game over 300 yards. If you need to do that, you are not a hunter, you are a shooter. Having said that, I have no problem with practiced shooters shooting big game at long range because there is equipment that can do it better than most hunters can at 25 yards. In fact, more game is wounded at 50 yards than 500.


Deer are worth more than cattle.with My proximity to ft hood army reservation reservation. I could book hunts every day and get 700.00 for a doe. You gut shoot a good buck you might as well gut shoot a cow same difference.

Deer and cattle are for eating and selling. Pigs are for hail Mary, and spray and pray shooting.

More game is wounded at 50 than 500 yards. Maybe but that's because most people don't shoot that for. It's a :bs:
Comparison. Come on Raven show me the science..... ;-)... :compute:


That was the basis for the statement. Shows just how you can make a deceitful TRUTHFUL statement. :lol:

Most people can't hit a deer at 500 yards to wound it...unless its in the leg or toe. Anyone who hasn't shot at targets at 500+ yards has no idea how much a bullet drops. I was amazed how much a slight crosswind can affect point of aim.
I thought Cooper built hunting rifles. Here's our local long range gunsmith and he can walk the talk.
http://www.whiddengunworks.com

Re: Old deer rifles

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:15 am
by callmefence
True Grit Farms wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
callmefence wrote:
Deer are worth more than cattle.with My proximity to ft hood army reservation reservation. I could book hunts every day and get 700.00 for a doe. You gut shoot a good buck you might as well gut shoot a cow same difference.

Deer and cattle are for eating and selling. Pigs are for hail Mary, and spray and pray shooting.

More game is wounded at 50 than 500 yards. Maybe but that's because most people don't shoot that for. It's a :bs:
Comparison. Come on Raven show me the science..... ;-)... :compute:


That was the basis for the statement. Shows just how you can make a deceitful TRUTHFUL statement. :lol:

Most people can't hit a deer at 500 yards to wound it...unless its in the leg or toe. Anyone who hasn't shot at targets at 500+ yards has no idea how much a bullet drops. I was amazed how much a slight crosswind can affect point of aim.
I thought Cooper built hunting rifles. Here's our local long range gunsmith and he can walk the talk.
http://www.whiddengunworks.com


My point exactly. At those distances being off 15 yards in your yardage estimate can make the difference.
You have to know the exact distance and wind. You have to know your cartridge. You have to do math. And you have to have a rock solid multiple point rest..... Raven nailed it that's shooting, not hunting.
To each his own. Your place your deer.
I typically hunt with my rifle a small pair of Steiner binos. The same clothes I where every day. And three shells in my gun. Oh and my pocket knife.

Could you pull up. Get out of your truck
Rest your rifle on a the bed of your truck. And hit at around 700 yards every time on the first shot.?

Re: Old deer rifles

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:43 am
by Bright Raven
True Grit Farms wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
callmefence wrote:
Deer are worth more than cattle.with My proximity to ft hood army reservation reservation. I could book hunts every day and get 700.00 for a doe. You gut shoot a good buck you might as well gut shoot a cow same difference.

Deer and cattle are for eating and selling. Pigs are for hail Mary, and spray and pray shooting.

More game is wounded at 50 than 500 yards. Maybe but that's because most people don't shoot that for. It's a :bs:
Comparison. Come on Raven show me the science..... ;-)... :compute:


That was the basis for the statement. Shows just how you can make a deceitful TRUTHFUL statement. :lol:

Most people can't hit a deer at 500 yards to wound it...unless its in the leg or toe. AnyoI :deadhorse: ne who hasn't shot at targets at 500+ yards has no idea how much a bullet drops. I was amazed how much a slight crosswind can affect point of aim.
I thought Cooper built hunting rifles. Here's our local long range gunsmith and he can walk the talk.
http://www.whiddengunworks.com


The ones that I know who can hit deer or even elk at 500 to a 1000 yards are using bench rest rifles.  They know exactly the yardage and have sighted their rifle on the path or crossing the deer or elk are going to come in on.  It is strictly shooting and nothing more than a novelty.

Grit:  when I lived in Helena, I had the guys at Cooper do some custom work on the chamber and crowning of their Montana model varmint rifle.  I actually stood in their shop and watched the machinist do the crown work.  They do make great hunting rifles.

When you think about it.  The guy who walks 300 yards to the woods behind his house and plants his deadazz on an oak stump and shoots a deer that wonders by is not exactly doing anything profound.  To each his own, as long as their humane in their methods.

Re: Old deer rifles

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 1:50 pm
by ALACOWMAN
Bright Raven wrote:
True Grit Farms wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
That was the basis for the statement. Shows just how you can make a deceitful TRUTHFUL statement. :lol:

Most people can't hit a deer at 500 yards to wound it...unless its in the leg or toe. AnyoI :deadhorse: ne who hasn't shot at targets at 500+ yards has no idea how much a bullet drops. I was amazed how much a slight crosswind can affect point of aim.
I thought Cooper built hunting rifles. Here's our local long range gunsmith and he can walk the talk.
http://www.whiddengunworks.com


The ones that I know who can hit deer or even elk at 500 to a 1000 yards are using bench rest rifles.  They know exactly the yardage and have sighted their rifle on the path or crossing the deer or elk are going to come in on.  It is strictly shooting and nothing more than a novelty.

Grit:  when I lived in Helena, I had the guys at Cooper do some custom work on the chamber and crowning of their Montana model varmint rifle.  I actually stood in their shop and watched the machinist do the crown work.  They do make great hunting rifles.

When you think about it.  The guy who walks 300 yards to the woods behind his house and plants his deadazz on an oak stump and shoots a deer that wonders by is not exactly doing anything profound.  To each his own, as long as their humane in their methods.
what about the ones that puts up a tree stand, then dumps a bunch of feed at the base.. It's like shooting fish in a barrel nowadays...

Re: Old deer rifles

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:06 pm
by Caustic Burno
ALACOWMAN wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
True Grit Farms wrote:Most people can't hit a deer at 500 yards to wound it...unless its in the leg or toe. AnyoI :deadhorse: ne who hasn't shot at targets at 500+ yards has no idea how much a bullet drops. I was amazed how much a slight crosswind can affect point of aim.
I thought Cooper built hunting rifles. Here's our local long range gunsmith and he can walk the talk.
http://www.whiddengunworks.com


The ones that I know who can hit deer or even elk at 500 to a 1000 yards are using bench rest rifles.  They know exactly the yardage and have sighted their rifle on the path or crossing the deer or elk are going to come in on.  It is strictly shooting and nothing more than a novelty.

Grit:  when I lived in Helena, I had the guys at Cooper do some custom work on the chamber and crowning of their Montana model varmint rifle.  I actually stood in their shop and watched the machinist do the crown work.  They do make great hunting rifles.

When you think about it.  The guy who walks 300 yards to the woods behind his house and plants his deadazz on an oak stump and shoots a deer that wonders by is not exactly doing anything profound.  To each his own, as long as their humane in their methods.
what about the ones that puts up a tree stand, then dumps a bunch of feed at the base.. It's like shooting fish in a barrel nowadays...


Saves ammo and you don’t have to drag them as far.
If I can’t get to one with the Mule now I won’t pull the trigger.

Re: Old deer rifles

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:20 pm
by Jogeephus
I get a chuckle when I see the guy with the 300WSM shooting deer at less than 100 yards but to each his own. If all I could shoot was sub 100 yard deer I think I'd lay down my rifle and pick up a bow and start tossing sticks at them.

Re: Old deer rifles

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:32 pm
by Caustic Burno
Jogeephus wrote:I get a chuckle when I see the guy with the 300WSM shooting deer at less than 100 yards but to each his own. If all I could shoot was sub 100 yard deer I think I'd lay down my rifle and pick up a bow and start tossing sticks at them.


100 yards is a long long shot in this thicket Jo.
When I leave the house this evening at 3 I will be toting a 28 gauge with pumpkin balls. A 195 grain ball at 2000 fps works pretty good.


Image

Re: Old deer rifles

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 3:04 pm
by callmefence
Jogeephus wrote:I get a chuckle when I see the guy with the 300WSM shooting deer at less than 100 yards but to each his own. If all I could shoot was sub 100 yard deer I think I'd lay down my rifle and pick up a bow and start tossing sticks at them.


I chuckle at just about everything you say. :lol2:

Re: Old deer rifles

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 3:10 pm
by Caustic Burno
Jo changed my mind walking out the door grabbed my old Winchester 1200 in 20 gauge.


Image

Re: Old deer rifles

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 3:45 pm
by Jogeephus
Caustic Burno wrote:Jo changed my mind walking out the door grabbed my old Winchester 1200 in 20 gauge.


Image


Nothing wrong with that but in some of the fields here you'd be just as well using a wrist rocket than those pumpkin balls because the trajectory would be about the same. At one of my favorite stands I'm centered at the cattle water source and am surrounded by woods and fields and have shooting distances that vary from 100 - 600 yards. Its rare to get a shot less than 200 yards. Its a fun stand to sit in.

I shot a 10 point yesterday afternoon in a thicket. Very memorable hunt since his bedding area was so thick the only clue I had that he was there was when he raised his head above the brush to nibble on maple twigs. This only lasted a couple seconds then he'd disappear. Someone else had hunted him for the last three days but never got a shot on him because they kept waiting for that "perfect shot" and he would only show himself for seconds before disappearing. The first time he raised his head clued me he was there and the second time was when I put one in his throat at 187 yards as he tried to bite the tender shoot off a maple tree. To me, that was fun.

Re: Old deer rifles

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 4:03 pm
by Caustic Burno
Jo I wouldn’t know how to act if it is past 30-30 distance. At the distance you hunt I would be just as effective with a butterfly net.
Here you go about 40 steps.
Image