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Asking for tips on training new blue heeler puppy

Posted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 1:35 pm
by Ky hills
We got her a couple of weeks ago, it's been a long time since I have had a young pup, and my wife's first time, so far she is in the house at least until spring. We have her sitting and staying for a short time, but are having trouble getting her to come to us if she is interested in anything else. She is peeing a lot of times inside and then whimpering afterwards, in spite of taking her outside at least every hour or two, and after she drinks. Wife wants to teach her not to bite, but so far having little success.

Re: Asking for tips on training new blue heeler puppy

Posted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 5:30 pm
by wbvs58
Just work on the basics like sitting before her meal and then releasing by saying "that'l do" and hand signal palm moving forward to release her to eat. If you have her sitting always remember to release her. Use a whistle to call her for her food.

Don't worry about her not coming to you they often go through a bit of a contrary stage. Only call her when you know she will come ie you have some attraction for her. Calling her when she is otherwise distracted just teaches her to disobey. You do go through a lot of pain with blue healers, that is what they do best but persist with it they will learn. We used to use a leather knuckle duster with tacks in it when cleaning out stables of young stallions that used to bite, we were never aggressive to them just put the hand in front of where they intended to nip and they inflicted the pain themselves. Something like that or a glove covered in a bittering agent might help.

Ken

Re: Asking for tips on training new blue heeler puppy

Posted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 6:11 pm
by Turkeybird
Put her in the cab of the truck and ride her as much as possible, talk to her (in ,out, up and down). As for the peeing, puppy pads work best for us, when she wets one inside put her nose in it spank gently and put outside for a few. I've raised a few and never had a bad one, starting on cattle is easy but teaching to stop and lie down or sit is key

Re: Asking for tips on training new blue heeler puppy

Posted: Mon Jan 30, 2017 9:40 pm
by Boot Jack Bulls
Like others have said, start with basic obedience. NO is the most important word in a heeler's dictionary. It is a word that must be used firmly and with authority. Keep commands short and clear, and always use the dogs name first. Decide now if you want them to watch the gate for you or move stock through it. Not all dogs can grasp a difference and you may end up shouting "Shiver, get out of the d**m gate!" so much, the dog think that's its name!

The nipping is a sign she is ready to start working. Give her instincts a purpose. If she continues to nip at humans after starting to work stock, a good slap on the nose with a firm "NO" is a good start. She also may be teething, so a good chew toy to distract her during down time may be a good idea.

Remember, you are now owned by a heeler. It is not a pet, it is a lifestyle!

Re: Asking for tips on training new blue heeler puppy

Posted: Wed Feb 08, 2017 3:17 pm
by reeler
Boot Jack Bulls wrote:
Remember, you are now owned by a heeler. It is not a pet, it is a lifestyle!

Your quote is just priceless :heart:
I too am owned by a heeler. Sorry to hijack the post, but do you have any training advice for an elder heeler around horses? My heeler has a vendetta against 1 of my horses, & I'm concerned. He's been kicked more than once, & continues to sneak in an attack on the horse. The horse keeps his leg cocked & ready. Any feedback appreciated.

Re: Asking for tips on training new blue heeler puppy

Posted: Wed Feb 08, 2017 5:01 pm
by Boot Jack Bulls
For an aged dog, a shock collar works wonders. Leave it on him all the time, and wear the button fob on a lanyard around your neck whenever you are out and about. If he moves on the horse without command to do so, Yell a firm "Blue(insert own dogs name here) NO", then give him a good zap, followed by another "NO". If you want him to completely leave the horse alone, be proactive. Try to get after him before he makes contact. Since heelers don't stalk, you will have to watch his body language more closely for cues. Usually they will be nice their ears and kind of freeze just before making a move. My dogs get used on everything, including horses and goats, so they are taught young to only bump the back cannons with their nose. They only are allowed to become more aggressive if told to do so. This is much easier to teach young dogs though. Some people bristle at the idea of a shock collar, but if used correctly it can be an excellent tool for a intelligent and headstrong breed. What ever method you attempt, be firm and fair, used the dog's name with the command, and be very consistent. Hope this helps!

Re: Asking for tips on training new blue heeler puppy

Posted: Thu Feb 09, 2017 4:45 am
by reeler
Boot Jack Bulls wrote:For an aged dog, a shock collar works wonders. Leave it on him all the time, and wear the button fob on a lanyard around your neck whenever you are out and about. If he moves on the horse without command to do so, Yell a firm "Blue(insert own dogs name here) NO", then give him a good zap, followed by another "NO". If you want him to completely leave the horse alone, be proactive. Try to get after him before he makes contact. Since heelers don't stalk, you will have to watch his body language more closely for cues. Usually they will be nice their ears and kind of freeze just before making a move. My dogs get used on everything, including horses and goats, so they are taught young to only bump the back cannons with their nose. They only are allowed to become more aggressive if told to do so. This is much easier to teach young dogs though. Some people bristle at the idea of a shock collar, but if used correctly it can be an excellent tool for a intelligent and headstrong breed. What ever method you attempt, be firm and fair, used the dog's name with the command, and be very consistent. Hope this helps!

Thank you so much for taking the time to answer. This could actually save my dog's life...the horse has been getting more aggressive towards him. Last night the horse was headed towards dog with ears pinned back, & i intervened. The incidents happen at feeding time, as the horse is headed to his stall.Dog tries to sneak up behind him & take a nip.As you said, a heeler is a Very Headstrong breed, & needs a direct method of training to be effective. My verbal commands are obviously not effective since this is still happening.Thanks again, wish me luck.

Re: Asking for tips on training new blue heeler puppy

Posted: Wed Feb 22, 2017 11:48 pm
by Stanford777
I have been through all of those wonderful heeler moments, and u can ask my wife, she would be gone before the heeler. Mine is living the retired life now tho, she's gotten old and fat and just rides in the truck. As far as training a pup I was given this advice that may seem cruel but with heelers it's the best way I've found to get their attention and for them to learn how to do their job to your satisfaction as far as working goes and it's a lunge line and a choke chain, and when they don't listen don't be scared to snatch back hard.

Re: Asking for tips on training new blue heeler puppy

Posted: Fri Feb 24, 2017 11:39 am
by Supa Dexta
There's a million hours of dog training tips on youtube.