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Seasoning

Posted: Wed May 10, 2017 6:48 am
by Bright Raven
WalnutCrest posted this:

WalnutCrest wrote:When is the last time you had a CAB steak that wasn't covered in sauce, pepper, bacon, mushrooms, etc?

It's been my experience when eating out that steak flavor is almost nonexistent, but the tenderness is (generally) quite good. So, the flavor had to be added with marinades, etc.


In prehistory, salts, herbs and spices were put on food to preserve it and to conceal the taste and odor of spoilage. Foods were not refrigerated. Early man was a hunter/gatherer. The food he carried spoiled. In order to make it edible, he covered it with salt, herbs and spices that he found to preserve it and make it more palatable.

As time passed, the value of salt, spices and herbs increased. They increased to the point that salt, spices and herbs were on par with gold and coin. Trade routes sprang up dedicated to the movement of spices, salt and herbs.

WalnutCrest makes an interesting point. Even with refrigeration, we still adhere to the practice of seasoning. It is part of our culture.

Re: Seasoning

Posted: Wed May 10, 2017 6:56 am
by M-5
humans need salt, Salt free diets are harmful

Re: Seasoning

Posted: Wed May 10, 2017 7:03 am
by Bigfoot
Cavemen were the originators of the patio kitchen-------Still in use today.

Re: Seasoning

Posted: Wed May 10, 2017 7:04 am
by Bright Raven
Bigfoot wrote:Cavemen were the originators of the patio kitchen-------Still in use today.


:lol: :lol:

Image


Image

Re: Seasoning

Posted: Wed May 10, 2017 7:24 am
by WalnutCrest
Bright Raven wrote:WalnutCrest posted this:

WalnutCrest wrote:When is the last time you had a CAB steak that wasn't covered in sauce, pepper, bacon, mushrooms, etc?

It's been my experience when eating out that steak flavor is almost nonexistent, but the tenderness is (generally) quite good. So, the flavor had to be added with marinades, etc.


In prehistory, salts, herbs and spices were put on food to preserve it and to conceal the taste and odor of spoilage. Foods were not refrigerated. Early man was a hunter/gatherer. The food he carried spoiled. In order to make it edible, he covered it with salt, herbs and spices that he found to preserve it and make it more palatable.

As time passed, the value of salt, spices and herbs increased. They increased to the point that salt, spices and herbs were on par with gold and coin. Trade routes sprang up dedicated to the movement of spices, salt and herbs.

WalnutCrest makes an interesting point. Even with refrigeration, we still adhere to the practice of seasoning. It is part of our culture.


There is a reason the most expensive beg in Europe is from cows aged 5-8 years and the second mossy expensive is 4 year old steers. Umami comes, in part, from older animals. The older they get, the beefier the flavor.

Also, the more diverse the diet, the more robust the flavor. This is particularly true for eating green forage from plants with deep (!) roots (weeds, trees). Monocultures are not friendly to the beg eating consumer.

Re: Seasoning

Posted: Wed May 10, 2017 7:29 am
by Bright Raven
WalnutCrest wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:WalnutCrest posted this:

WalnutCrest wrote:When is the last time you had a CAB steak that wasn't covered in sauce, pepper, bacon, mushrooms, etc?

It's been my experience when eating out that steak flavor is almost nonexistent, but the tenderness is (generally) quite good. So, the flavor had to be added with marinades, etc.


In prehistory, salts, herbs and spices were put on food to preserve it and to conceal the taste and odor of spoilage. Foods were not refrigerated. Early man was a hunter/gatherer. The food he carried spoiled. In order to make it edible, he covered it with salt, herbs and spices that he found to preserve it and make it more palatable.

As time passed, the value of salt, spices and herbs increased. They increased to the point that salt, spices and herbs were on par with gold and coin. Trade routes sprang up dedicated to the movement of spices, salt and herbs.

WalnutCrest makes an interesting point. Even with refrigeration, we still adhere to the practice of seasoning. It is part of our culture.


There is a reason the most expensive beg in Europe is from cows aged 5-8 years and the second mossy expensive is 4 year old steers. Umami comes, in part, from older animals. The older they get, the beefier the flavor.

Also, the more diverse the diet, the more robust the flavor. This is particularly true for eating green forage from plants with deep (!) roots (weeds, trees). Monocultures are not friendly to the beg eating consumer.


It may be my imagination, but we butchered our own beef when I was growing up on the farm. We had a small dairy herd of mixed mongrel cows. We selected a calf each year to butcher. Sometimes they were Jersey or Holstein or Guernsey, didn't really matter. But that beef still sticks in my mind as the most juicy flavorful, I have ever eaten.

Re: Seasoning

Posted: Wed May 10, 2017 7:37 am
by Bright Raven
WalnutCrest,

I should mention that if we culled a cow that wasn't too poor, we butchered her. You are correct. Some of those old cows were good.

Re: Seasoning

Posted: Wed May 10, 2017 7:40 am
by WalnutCrest
Posting from my phone does me no favors. Typos are a huge pretty peeve of mine. Thanks for overlooking them. :)

Re: Seasoning

Posted: Wed May 10, 2017 9:16 pm
by M.Magis
If you're steak house is flavoring their steak with anything but salt, pepper, and fire.... Find another steak house. They're using lesser meat and I seriously boubt it's CAB.

I butchered an older cow once. I only have one set of teeth, so I won't be doing that again.

Re: Seasoning

Posted: Wed May 10, 2017 10:01 pm
by Son of Butch
M.Magis wrote:If your steak house is flavoring their steak with anything but salt, pepper, and fire.... Find another steak house.
They're using lesser meat...

I don't have a steakhouse but if a restaurant serves me a tender steak that I also find truly delicious what do I care if
their secret spice mix also contains garlic, sugar, dill seed, ground coriander, nutmeg, chocolate, basil, mustard seed,
sesame seed, ground chili peppers, paprika, rosemary, fennel, butter or whatever else they choose.
If it's properly prepared and I really really enjoy it, then it wouldn't make any sense to find another restaurant.
Instead I'd order it again and again. Just because it isn't like what my mother used to make doesn't mean it isn't good.

Re: Seasoning

Posted: Wed May 10, 2017 10:35 pm
by Nesikep
I do like burger from old cow, steaks not so much.. my 30 month old steers or bulls have been a nice balance, tender steaks that are still flavorful.

Yes, I do add spice to my steak.. because I like the flavor of the spice too

Re: Seasoning

Posted: Thu May 11, 2017 7:47 am
by Jogeephus
I don't believe in limiting options. I can enjoy a steak that was simply salted but I can also enjoy the taste of a steak that has a wide array of spices on it with a good dose of butter. Just this month I experimented with a new binder capable of binding four times its weight of water in the meat. Instead of water I chose to use beer. A dark stout. The reviews were all positive. Afterall, how can you go wrong when meat tastes like a good beer?

Re: Seasoning

Posted: Thu May 11, 2017 8:11 am
by Bright Raven
Jogeephus wrote:I don't believe in limiting options. I can enjoy a steak that was simply salted but I can also enjoy the taste of a steak that has a wide array of spices on it with a good dose of butter. Just this month I experimented with a new binder capable of binding four times its weight of water in the meat. Instead of water I chose to use beer. A dark stout. The reviews were all positive. Afterall, how can you go wrong when meat tastes like a good beer?


I'll drink to that.

Re: Seasoning

Posted: Thu May 11, 2017 9:24 am
by M.Magis
Son of Butch wrote:
M.Magis wrote:If your steak house is flavoring their steak with anything but salt, pepper, and fire.... Find another steak house.
They're using lesser meat...

I don't have a steakhouse but if a restaurant serves me a tender steak that I also find truly delicious what do I care if
their secret spice mix also contains garlic, sugar, dill seed, ground coriander, nutmeg, chocolate, basil, mustard seed,
sesame seed, ground chili peppers, paprika, rosemary, fennel, butter or whatever else they choose.
If it's properly prepared and I really really enjoy it, then it wouldn't make any sense to find another restaurant.
Instead I'd order it again and again. Just because it isn't like what my mother used to make doesn't mean it isn't good.

Okay, fair enough. But if someone is going to complain or claim they can't find a good steak without being covered in something, they should find another. There are a lot out there.

Re: Seasoning

Posted: Thu May 11, 2017 11:09 am
by ez14.
WalnutCrest wrote:Posting from my phone does me no favors. Typos are a huge pretty peeve of mine. Thanks for overlooking them. :)

sorry walnut i had to do it :lol: