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Sous vide rib eye, ? For Jo or anyone

Posted: Thu May 11, 2017 10:31 am
by Alan
Planning on trying your tips on sous vide with a rib eye. I'll season the steak and then vacuum seal it, place in simmering water at about 150 degrees for about three hours. First question is I assume the steak will be float, if so do I need to turn the bag every so often? Also simmering in 150 degree water for about 3 hours I assume there is no need for a meat thermometer during the process, only after I remove it from the bag. Dumb questions maybe, but hey.....you know me. :lol:

Re: Sous vide rib eye, ? For Jo or anyone

Posted: Mon May 15, 2017 12:17 pm
by warped04
Sometimes they float, sometimes they hang out just below the surface. If they float, we always try to keep them submerged (or else the part that's not underwater doesn't cook).

The next part, I'm not saying it's "right" but we never seasoned before sous vide. After we pulled whatever we had sous vide for service or during service, we let it hang out season and sear (especially when we deep fried), we'd season after sous vide (after frying, before searing). We believed that salt pulls out meat love via osmosis.

Now I have done tons of marinating in sous vide bags (go away health dept, I hate you), where we did have salt, but we always kept it to minimum.

And no, you don't need a meat thermometer in the meat, during the process but you do need one in the water.

Re: Sous vide rib eye, ? For Jo or anyone

Posted: Mon May 15, 2017 12:49 pm
by Jogeephus
I agree with Warp but I like to season the meat before it goes in the bag. For steak, I find a pat of butter and salt and pepper does wonders. I also find it helpful to take a clothes pin and clip it to the lip of the container and the bag. This keeps the bag vertical so it will stay submerged well.

Whether you season or not its up to you but no matter your choice the end result should be great.

Re: Sous vide rib eye, ? For Jo or anyone

Posted: Mon May 15, 2017 1:45 pm
by warped04
I just checked my Modernist Cuisine At Home book, and they talk about checking the core temperature using a thermometer in the meat. The technique is labeled "How to Check the Core Temperature (Without Obessing About It)" My other Modernist books are packed, but I think the key is "without obsessing about it." And they only suggest it to "learn how long it takes to heat various foods to particular temperatures."

In regards to the salt. I know some guys do it, and I know we did it for non-meat foods, so I don't think it's an issue if you do it, but I wouldn't do it like 2 days ahead. Depending on salt levels you will prematurely extract meat love at some point in time.

Re: Sous vide rib eye, ? For Jo or anyone

Posted: Mon May 15, 2017 7:08 pm
by Jogeephus
I agree. I wouldn't want the steak sitting in salt for any length of time. I just salt and pepper it right before sealing it. What little juices are extracted I use to make sauce. Learning the timing is important but with a whole cut of meat the worst you can do is have it under-cook it possibly and that's easily fixed. Though I think this technique works good on steak I think where it truly shines is on meats like chicken breast and other meats that people tend to overcook. I use this a lot for venison and formed meats.

Re: Sous vide rib eye, ? For Jo or anyone

Posted: Mon May 15, 2017 7:45 pm
by warped04
Great idea on the sauce! We used to do a bacon wrapped pork tenderloin, we did it to mid rare, so we could crisp up the bacon and serve. It was my favorite.

Re: Sous vide rib eye, ? For Jo or anyone

Posted: Mon May 15, 2017 8:36 pm
by artesianspringsfarm
I also salt just before sealing in the bag but the one thing I see amiss in the plan is keeping it at 150. I really think 134-136 is best for a cut with fat in it like ribeye. If you want it a little more than Med/Rare, just sear it a little longer. If you cant keep it precisely at mid 130s, maybe go with 140.

Re: Sous vide rib eye, ? For Jo or anyone

Posted: Mon May 15, 2017 9:46 pm
by Jogeephus
artesianspringsfarm wrote:I also salt just before sealing in the bag but the one thing I see amiss in the plan is keeping it at 150. I really think 134-136 is best for a cut with fat in it like ribeye. If you want it a little more than Med/Rare, just sear it a little longer. If you cant keep it precisely at mid 130s, maybe go with 140.


I'd be more inclined to use your temperatures because I don't like overcooked beef. I also do chicken around 145-150 and its incredible.