Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

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Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

Postby Jogeephus » Sun May 17, 2015 12:47 pm

Anyone do this with their canning? Any tips?
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Re: Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

Postby chippie » Sun May 17, 2015 3:58 pm

It is for fermented and pickled foods. I don't make enough pickles to try it.
Anywhoo, I would probably end up burning myself trying to keep track of the temperature.
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Re: Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

Postby ga.prime » Sun May 17, 2015 4:06 pm

I don't know. Just getting cucumbers out of the garden and putting in a jar of Claussens pickle juice doesn't work. Not for long anyway. That's the extent of my experience in this field of endeavor.
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Re: Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

Postby HDRider » Sun May 17, 2015 4:24 pm

I never knew what to call it. I do this with anything that has a low ph (vinegar to regulate ph) and I use a meter. Plus I factor in salt too. Gotta be safe.

I just bring water to a boil, pour over whatever, mostly peppers, and put the lid and ring on. It seals after about four hours.

Normal high acid like tomatoes, might not need vinegar. You can use lime or lemon juice too. I never did, but I guess citric acid work too.

Is that what you are calling LTPC?

Wouldn't it have to boil to pasteurize?
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Re: Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

Postby chippie » Sun May 17, 2015 4:36 pm

When I do can pickles, I process in a boiling water bath.
I recently bought a new electric canner. It is awesome. I don't have to worry about an open flame and the kitchen stays cool.

This is low temperature pasteurization canning.
http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_06/low_temp_pasteur.html

The website http://nchfp.uga.edu/ - National Center for Home Food Preservation is a wealth of information. There is more to canning & pickling than just pouring boiling water in your jars, putting the lids on and waiting for them to seal.

Jams, Jellies, Pickles and more should be processed in a water bath canner and many vegetables should be processed in a pressure canner. Tomatoes are one.

http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can3_tomato.html

Here is the page about pickling.

http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_06/prep_foods.html
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Re: Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

Postby ga.prime » Sun May 17, 2015 5:19 pm

How Claussen's makes their pickles is what I'd like to know. I think the answer falls under the title of this thread, not trying to go off on a tangent here. It says on the jar they were never heated. That they were never heated seems pretty obvious when you eat one and it's just as crispy and crunchy as it was the minute it was picked off the vine.
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Re: Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

Postby CottageFarm » Sun May 17, 2015 5:20 pm

Sorry, I haven't tried it either Joe. I have a tendency to walk away from my canner and figured I would end up boiling it anyway so just stuck with water bathing my pickles. Always thought it would be just the ticket for sauerkraut, but haven't gotten around to trying that either. :lol:
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Re: Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

Postby Jogeephus » Sun May 17, 2015 9:42 pm

ga.prime wrote:How Claussen's makes their pickles is what I'd like to know. I think the answer falls under the title of this thread, not trying to go off on a tangent here. It says on the jar they were never heated. That they were never heated seems pretty obvious when you eat one and it's just as crispy and crunchy as it was the minute it was picked off the vine.


GP, there are three other ways I know that will do some of this but it requires major money but Claussen's surely has it. One way is to irradiate the food and its safe. I think the machine is around a half million dollars. The other way is put it under pressure. This is done mostly with meat about 1300 psi. Can't explain why it doesn't mash the meat but it doesn't. The other way which I suspect Claussen could be using if they are not irradiating their stuff is a modification of this low temp pasteurization canning but applying a vacuum to the batch then applying heat if needed. Funny stuff happens under a vacuum. Don't really understand it. But I looked this up and water will boil at 80F at a pressure of .491 psia. Since the point would be to pasteurize at 180F in our world then it might only take 70F to meet its equivalent under the vacuum.

I tried some of the LTP canning today. I've read about how it leaves things crisper. Thought I'd give it a try and see how it worked. Bad thing is I made something I'd never made before so I won't really have anything to compare it to.
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Re: Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

Postby HDRider » Mon May 18, 2015 5:06 am

So how'd you do it Jo?
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Re: Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

Postby Jogeephus » Mon May 18, 2015 6:30 am

You just submerge the jars in 180 degree water for 30 minutes. It takes longer but its supposed to be better.
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Re: Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

Postby M.Magis » Mon May 18, 2015 8:10 am

HDRider wrote:I just bring water to a boil, pour over whatever, mostly peppers, and put the lid and ring on. It seals after about four hours.

This is how I do pepper rings. To be safe, I’ve been storing them in a spare fridge. But it crapped out on me about a month ago, so I’ll soon find out if they need cold storage when I open the next jar. The lids seal fine, and as far as I can tell they would be okay in the cupboard with the other canned foods. It’s the only way I’ve found to keep the peppers crisp. The “brine” is simply vinegar and sugar.
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Re: Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

Postby Jogeephus » Mon May 18, 2015 8:29 am

Made some zucchini pickles yesterday using this method. Tested them this morning and they have a nice crunch to them about the same crunch as before they were processed. I'll keep tinkering with this method and see how they keep. If it works good I'll be able to can more jars using some modified pasteurization equipment.

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Re: Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

Postby M.Magis » Mon May 18, 2015 9:26 am

One thing I noticed is that it takes a week or two before my pepper rings are actually pickled. The texture and flavor changes slightly each day, until things normalize within two weeks.
A friend here at work knew someone that started selling their “family recipe” picked something (peppers I think) commercially. They had always just poured the boiling brine in the jars and sealed them up like I’m currently doing. In order to sell them commercially, the FDA told him he just had to add a 5 minute water bath to the process. I plan to try that this year and compare the texture to the ones with no water bath.
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Re: Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

Postby ga.prime » Mon May 18, 2015 11:30 am

Jogeephus wrote:
ga.prime wrote:How Claussen's makes their pickles is what I'd like to know. I think the answer falls under the title of this thread, not trying to go off on a tangent here. It says on the jar they were never heated. That they were never heated seems pretty obvious when you eat one and it's just as crispy and crunchy as it was the minute it was picked off the vine.

GP, there are three other ways I know that will do some of this but it requires major money but Claussen's surely has it. One way is to irradiate the food and its safe. I think the machine is around a half million dollars. The other way is put it under pressure. This is done mostly with meat about 1300 psi. Can't explain why it doesn't mash the meat but it doesn't. The other way which I suspect Claussen could be using if they are not irradiating their stuff is a modification of this low temp pasteurization canning but applying a vacuum to the batch then applying heat if needed. Funny stuff happens under a vacuum. Don't really understand it. But I looked this up and water will boil at 80F at a pressure of .491 psia. Since the point would be to pasteurize at 180F in our world then it might only take 70F to meet its equivalent under the vacuum.

Thanks, man. Those are some good ideas but outside the realm of my capabilities unfortunately.
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Re: Low Temp Pasteurization Canning

Postby chippie » Mon May 18, 2015 11:56 am

Pickles can take up to 6 weeks to ripen after being canned. Sometimes it is really hard to wait.

Claussen's is a refrigerator pickle. Here is a copycat recipe. http://www.food.com/recipe/claussen-kos ... cat-249520

I have another refrigerator pickle recipe that has onion rings in it. the onions are so good on a sandwich. I'll see if I can it. I like the refrigerator pickles. They are so much easier to make, but they don't keep as long.
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