By The Sweat of thier Brow

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Brute 23
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Brute 23 » Mon Jun 19, 2017 8:45 am

That's a great video.

HDRider wrote:
Caustic Burno wrote:No barely getting by was not my cup of tea. I could see right quick there were smarter ways to make a living.

It is simply an opportunity, now lost. A man could start small and take it as far as he wanted. Not everyone is as smart as you, or headed in the same direction as you.


I agree 100%. It would not be my cup of tea either but it's a great opportunity for some one.
Last edited by Brute 23 on Mon Jun 19, 2017 11:45 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Caustic Burno » Mon Jun 19, 2017 10:39 am

I don't even know how that would work here as tracts are bought by loggers or sold on tonnage
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby hurleyjd » Mon Jun 19, 2017 10:45 am

Lots of things that a farm family could do to make a living during the fifties, Dad produced water melons and did very well Mom had a chicken flock and sold eggs to the local grocer. We kids milked the cows in one of the first grade A dairy barns in our area. My Dad would be selling watermelons to the independent truckers out of Louisiana after every one else decided that it was not worth their time to gather and sell the melons at the price offered. After all melons were sold that could be sold we would repair the fences around the melon patches now I am talking about fifty to a hundred acres. Dad would go to the cow sale and buy some grown cows and turn them out. A lots of grass in the patches. Cut a few melons for the cows and they would learn to step on the melons and eat them. Now everything is commercial and big operators not much way to support a family farm without some outside income from somewhere. Wife teaching school or working in the bank, legal assistant, or etc.
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Brute 23 » Mon Jun 19, 2017 11:47 am

That's the problem with this whole global market deal. Back then you supplied your little area. There were lots of little producers. Now there are few mega-companies. Even though it looks like we are headed for a slow shift if the govt will allow it.
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Jogeephus » Mon Jun 19, 2017 3:10 pm

hurleyjd wrote:Lots of things that a farm family could do to make a living during the fifties, Dad produced water melons and did very well Mom had a chicken flock and sold eggs to the local grocer. We kids milked the cows in one of the first grade A dairy barns in our area. My Dad would be selling watermelons to the independent truckers out of Louisiana after every one else decided that it was not worth their time to gather and sell the melons at the price offered. After all melons were sold that could be sold we would repair the fences around the melon patches now I am talking about fifty to a hundred acres. Dad would go to the cow sale and buy some grown cows and turn them out. A lots of grass in the patches. Cut a few melons for the cows and they would learn to step on the melons and eat them. Now everything is commercial and big operators not much way to support a family farm without some outside income from somewhere. Wife teaching school or working in the bank, legal assistant, or etc.


That sounds very similar to how it was here. There was a time when the local grocers would buy your produce and sell on their shelves. It was good for everyone but I suspect there is some rule against this now. I think the nation was stronger when the economy was comprised of these little micro-economies rather than being so centralized.

Going back to the pulpwood, there used to be pulpwood yards in most every small town in Georgia that had a train track running through it. Here they would unload pulpwood to a rail car and pay you. It was as simple as selling cattle but all you had in it was the sweat of your brow and some fuel.

The draw was shortwood, unlike tree length pulpwood, was viewed as waste and not worth the hassle to the guys with equipment who worked on production so all you needed was a truck and a chainsaw and you were in business. For these people it was like money laying in the woods just waiting to be picked up. Typically, arrangements with the production loggers were made and the shortwooders would follow them around like remoras follow sharks. Today, you are not going set foot on a wood yard unless you can show proof of $2 million liability insurance, all your DOT papers and proof of worker's comp insurance. I only know of one yard that will still buy from the public but the owner of this yard is about 80 years old and just does it because he doesn't like anyone telling him what to do. Prior to 2000 we had two local yards but they are closed now.
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby hurleyjd » Mon Jun 19, 2017 3:49 pm

My wife and I married in 1961 in 1963 we bought 88.5 acres of wooded land for 87.50 per acre. A man had set up a cross tie mill down the road from me. He came and looked and we struck a deal for $3 a tie. A man moved on the place from Oklahoma built a tar paper shack and a corral for his mules. That is what they skidded the logs with. You could hardly tell he had been in the woods. We sold about $3000 dollars worth of ties and it went a long way to paying the place off.
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Jogeephus » Mon Jun 19, 2017 4:16 pm

hurleyjd wrote:My wife and I married in 1961 in 1963 we bought 88.5 acres of wooded land for 87.50 per acre. A man had set up a cross tie mill down the road from me. He came and looked and we struck a deal for $3 a tie. A man moved on the place from Oklahoma built a tar paper shack and a corral for his mules. That is what they skidded the logs with. You could hardly tell he had been in the woods. We sold about $3000 dollars worth of ties and it went a long way to paying the place off.


That's pretty neat. We used to have a lot of those "peckerwood" mills scattered around. Just out of curiosity, is the sawdust pile still there? You can still find them scattered in the woods here. They don't seem to rot and don't seem to burn.

I knew an old man who told me his grandfather bought a farm sometime around 1910 and when WW1 broke he sold three trees to Navy for a dollar a foot and trees paid off his land. All his grandfather had to do was drag them to the road - which I imagine was a job.

Land here was cheap and many viewed it as a tax liability because a family couldn't work about 40 acres and anything more seemed inefficient. There is a land lot next to my house that was traded for a shotgun and everyone thought the man was crazy.
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby backhoeboogie » Mon Jun 19, 2017 4:56 pm

The lumber companies badger me with requests to cut my timber in East Texas. I would let them thin the pines. But they all want to clear cut it. Take out the old growth hickory etc. So it sits there. I have had fears of tornadoes. Thieves. There is an old Caddo village in the middle of it and you can see the foundations still. I don't want that section desecrated and I don't want any do gooders knowing it is there.

So my land just sits.
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Jogeephus » Mon Jun 19, 2017 8:14 pm

Yeah, the wrong person could cause you grief with a historic site on your property. I know where there are some indian mounds on private property. They are difficult to get to but the landowner cannot do anything with this portion of his property and the gov't comes to check on things a few times each year. I'm real tempted to hike in there with a shovel and root around a bit and see what I can find but its only a pipe dream.
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby backhoeboogie » Tue Jun 20, 2017 1:01 pm

Jogee I was told these were burial mounds in my youth. After much research on the Caddo, I have learned they had farming villages out from main villages etc. They mounded up their floors to keep the houses from flooding. Every three years or so they burned their houses down and started over, building upon the old foundation.

Looking at the layouts of the dirt mounds, spacing, and number, I have decided that I have a small hunting or farming outpost.

I also read that they always hid a cache of tools and utensils nearby. So my interest has changed and centers around finding the cache, if it still exists. To the best of my knowledge, no one has ever dug on or near the area. But I could be dead wrong there too.
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby TexasBred » Tue Jun 20, 2017 2:11 pm

backhoeboogie wrote:The lumber companies badger me with requests to cut my timber in East Texas. I would let them thin the pines. But they all want to clear cut it. Take out the old growth hickory etc. So it sits there. I have had fears of tornadoes. Thieves. There is an old Caddo village in the middle of it and you can see the foundations still. I don't want that section desecrated and I don't want any do gooders knowing it is there.

So my land just sits.

Hardwoods should be ok but pine beetles are killing worlds of old timer in East Texas. Keep an eye on it.
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby hurleyjd » Wed Jun 21, 2017 6:45 am

That was a pretty nice Studebaker pickup the folks arrived in to fight the fire.
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Jogeephus » Wed Jun 21, 2017 7:46 am

hurleyjd wrote:That was a pretty nice Studebaker pickup the folks arrived in to fight the fire.


Far cry from a 2017 Dodge Laramie Longhorn though. Just saying. ;-) :lol2:
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby backhoeboogie » Wed Jun 21, 2017 8:18 am

Jogeephus wrote:
hurleyjd wrote:That was a pretty nice Studebaker pickup the folks arrived in to fight the fire.


Far cry from a 2017 Dodge Laramie Longhorn though. Just saying. ;-) :lol2:


Dodge is now making a Studebaker knock off too? :lol:
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Re: By The Sweat of thier Brow

Postby Jogeephus » Wed Jun 21, 2017 8:32 am

Only in the solar model. Gonna compete with the Prius. Prius sounds so prissy so the Studebaker with its swagger should be some tough competition
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