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Re: Idaman

Posted: Tue Sep 14, 2010 7:03 pm
by Idaman
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5wa9KcsLrQ

A fun summer job tne cows really enjoy.

At 8000 feet it seems to work best in the summer.

Remember when at the Denver carload show W. T. Waggoner Estate bought 200 bulls that had to be dipped before leaving the yards. If you were there to see them when they came out you really could see the good ones.

Re: Idaman

Posted: Sat Sep 18, 2010 10:52 pm
by Idaman
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMw011Vdbs4

Too many memories to comment.

Re: Idaman

Posted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 10:10 am
by Alan
Great videos, please keep them coming. What year do you think that was filmed? Just curious to why some of the hay was stacked loose and some baled?

Thanks again,
Alan

Re: Idaman

Posted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 10:23 am
by highgrit
Mr. Idaman, thanks. Nobody has been there and done it all, but I think your getting close thanks again.

Re: Idaman

Posted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 4:40 pm
by Idaman
Alan wrote:Great videos, please keep them coming. What year do you think that was filmed? Just curious to why some of the hay was stacked loose and some baled?

Thanks again,
Alan


Thanks so very. Judging by the age of the dog I would say it was filmed between 1942 and 1944.

All of the hay was stacked loose and then when it was all put up they used a stationary baler to bale what they were planning to sell and ship via rail to major cities to fuel their delivery horses. Wells Fargo, mail delivery and many other uses. The very best hay that was baled went for sale and the cows got what was left over. Judging by the color of the stacked hay in the video it was too brown to bale and with the amount of snow on it they probably had a wet fall and the mold or brownness went pretty deep.

They pulled the baler from stack to stack and then baled them on the spot. The first baler used in our family was water powered and was in use prior to 1890. The water powered baler was located in a large shed and the hay was hauled to it. There was a canal from the Arkansas river diverted through the barn that turned the water wheel to power the baler.

Later I will have a tractor driven stationary baler in action in a video.

Re: Idaman

Posted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 4:43 pm
by Idaman
highgrit wrote:Mr. Idaman, thanks. Nobody has been there and done it all, but I think your getting close thanks again.


Like one of our neighbors told his son " You must be going to make one h@lluva manager cause you are good at so little else."

Re: Idaman

Posted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 7:18 pm
by Angus Cowman
I have used a gas stationary baler when I was a kid a neighbor had one
he also had one that was horsepowered but I never seen it used I have seen one just like it at Silver Dollar city

sure was a slow way to bale hay :lol: :lol:

Re: Idaman

Posted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 7:29 pm
by Idaman
Angus Cowman wrote:I have used a gas stationary baler when I was a kid a neighbor had one
he also had one that was horsepowered but I never seen it used I have seen one just like it at Silver Dollar city

sure was a slow way to bale hay :lol: :lol:



Ours were belt driven at first by a steam tractor and then later by a Fordson gas. They were made by Case.

Re: Idaman

Posted: Wed Sep 22, 2010 7:15 pm
by Idaman
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZHR5uhlU4e4

They used all the teams to mow hay until noon and then raked and stacked in the afternoon. They changed mower sickles at 10:00 AM.

They had as many as 25 teams working at one time on these places. In the winter they sure comsumed a lot of hay.

There were frequent run-aways with the somewhat bronkey horses that were only used for haying about 2 months per year. One run away team was hitched to a dump rake and when the made a turn by a house the rake flipped up and left a wheel track across the wooden siding on the house. The mark went right below the second story window and is still there today. When the rake came down it landed upside down in front of the horses and they were both killed on it.

The funny looking hay fluffer near the end of the video was called a kicker.

Re: Idaman

Posted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 5:39 pm
by Idaman
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNe1bot22y8

The buckrakes in this video were called "Doodlebugs". The were made from an old car or more likely truck that they stripped down, turned the controls around, and turned the rear end over to give four speeds backward, to the normal direction of the truck and one in the other direction.

Re: Idaman

Posted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:40 pm
by gbrumbelow
Very enjoyable footage, Idaman. Thanks for figuring out how to convert these old films to YouTube.

Makes me wonder. If the Lord should tarry and 50 years from now ranchers are still haying, what will they say about our technology "way back in 2010"?

Re: Idaman

Posted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 11:05 pm
by Idaman
gbrumbelow wrote:Very enjoyable footage, Idaman. Thanks for figuring out how to convert these old films to YouTube.

Makes me wonder. If the Lord should tarry and 50 years from now ranchers are still haying, what will they say about our technology "way back in 2010"?


Maybe we'll start all over. :D :D

Re: Idaman

Posted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 5:47 am
by Angus Cowman
the same neighbor that had the old square balers also stacked his hay
when I was about 8 or 9 I started raking for him he had the old bull rakes and I would drive a F12 farmall and pull the hay to the stacker that he had mounted on a tractor and he would stack it

he was still stacking hay in the early 80s his stacks weren't near as big as the ones you guys had

he was the only one still doing it that I can ever remember

Re: Idaman

Posted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 5:33 pm
by Northern Rancher
Did they ever learn how to cable on loose hay stacks-they used overshot stackers up here and the oldtimers said they used a long cable to flip the stack onto sleighs-they used 12x24 decks.

Re: Idaman

Posted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 7:34 pm
by Idaman
Northern Rancher wrote:Did they ever learn how to cable on loose hay stacks-they used overshot stackers up here and the oldtimers said they used a long cable to flip the stack onto sleighs-they used 12x24 decks.


Yes they did especially with the overshots. Usually they didn't try to move the stack or parts they just baled it in place. This particular stacker was a swing stacker and was called a Meadow Queen. I believe that some parts of it if not all were manufactured.

They even had man powered saws that could cut the stack in parts. It was kind of a cable with sharp edges on it.