Idaman

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Idaman
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Re: Idaman

Postby Idaman » Mon Jan 17, 2011 8:31 pm

When our youngest son was small there was a rat that took up residence under the back end of our bathtub. He came in there from the outside and was sealed off there from being able to enter the house. When he came in to his nest or exited he always bumped his head on the bottom of the tub and you could feel that bump a little bit. This just drove our son nuts and he went into some kind of fit every time. Upon quizzing him we finally learned that what he really feared was that the rat would someday crawl out of the tubs' water faucet. Ever try explaining to a four year old the principles and design of a house water system?

Alec, our wonderful old cow foreman and guide, and I were staying in the Yodel cabin one fall and we were sleeping in the bunk bed. I had to have the top for length as my feet always hung over and Alec had the lower bunk because it was the most comfortable in the cabin. There was quite a mouse problem there at the time because the two cats that we planted there earlier in the spring had come to a disagreement with our cow dogs. The cats were so upset that they quit their jobs and headed for parts unknown which left us with a totally unnecessary mouse over population.

When we both were in bed and the cabin was dark so you could hear the mice scurrying about. Since this was a rough log cabin the logs became a Mouse I70. As one was racing past Alec in his sleeping bag the mouse made a detour and went down into Alec's sleeping bag with Alec still in residence. Alec calmly said “A mice just went down inside my sleeping bag and I can feel him crawling around my toes. Maybe I should get up and let him out of there.” He no sooner said that when he said “That mice is coming up and is leaving now.” I can't really picture just what my wife would have done if that had been her but I assure you the scene would not have been calm or pretty. I'll bet if she had grabbed him she would have squeezed about a quart of water out of him or that would be at least the size of the puddle under her bed.

I have never understood how a woman so fearless with bears could go batty over a miniscule mouse.
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Re: Idaman

Postby Idaman » Mon Jan 17, 2011 8:51 pm

Since I can't edit the last post I will add here what I tried to add there.

Over the years my wife has become quite an accomplished and noted mouse trapper. Her record is two mice side by side in one trap. I suggested that maybe we should have the whole thing mounted to hang beside our other trophies but she declined that generous offer. :???:
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Re: Idaman

Postby I luv herfrds » Tue Jan 18, 2011 12:27 am

Your wife and I would get along concerning the mouse issue.

Not long after hubby and I got married we were up at the hay stack loading the truck with square bales and we had mice shooting out of the bales at the bottom like mad. Hubby's dog was chasing and killing them and the few that ran at me I stomped on them.

well one of those furry little pests jumped on top of my boot and headed straight up the inside of my pant leg.
Needless to say there was some hopping, jumping, cussing, dog barking and pants dropping to get rid of the mouse.
Hubby about hurt himself laughing over the whole deal.
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Re: Idaman

Postby Idaman » Tue Jan 18, 2011 12:25 pm

I can almost picture your mouse dance. Always the last few bales in the stack were the worst. I may post a movie of one of our dogs scurrying about looking for mice in just this situation.

You may also connect with my wife in her deep and everlasting hatred of rattlesnakes. Every one she sees she is committed to killing. A few years ago when she was driving our old Suburban up the very winding road to the valley where we live she spotted a rattler on the road and she went into the kill mode. I had taught her that if you either tap your brakes or step on the throttle when you run over the snake it tears them up worse and you get a more sure kill. This time she slowed down and then when the rear wheels were about to cross the snake she jammed the throttle to the floor. The Suburban shot forward but when she let off on the throttle it stuck to the floor. She was really gaining speed at this point and wasn't thinking about the key or shifting into neutral. She was just trying to keep the car on the road. Soon it hit her and she turned the key off and stopped. I thought that by now she would have forgotten the snake but no she turned around and went clear back down to where the snake was to make sure she had a kill. Luckily the snake was mangled and she felt all puffed up.

I don't know anyone who sees more rattlers in more odd places than she does. They just seem to gravitate to wherever she is.
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Re: Idaman

Postby I luv herfrds » Tue Jan 18, 2011 6:08 pm

:lol2: :lol2:
I only see them if they are close enough.
Hubby does a power braking over rattlesnakes with his 1924 Model T.
I chased one across the highway with a pulaskie, but it got in the grass and I didn't follow.
Did kill one with the handle of stock whip.
I run over them every chance I get.

Got a neighbor that can spot a rattlesnake a mile away.
Watched him one day trying to get his bull out of our cows and he would go chasing the bull on his 4-wheeler and then he would suddenly jerk to one side. He did this several times.
Finally asked him what he was doing, missing the rattlesnakes.
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Re: Idaman

Postby Idaman » Tue Jan 18, 2011 7:14 pm

They must be around then. In one of our pastures our son gets so tired of getting off of his horse and killing them that he has just quit.
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Re: Idaman

Postby Ned Jr. » Mon Jan 24, 2011 7:39 pm

She found another one.

Image
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Re: Idaman

Postby Idaman » Mon Jan 24, 2011 9:34 pm

What did I do to deserve this?

However, that is Pammy my first dog along with Sport our cowdog.

Hope all is very well with you and your fine cattle.

Talked to Jack G. a day or two ago and he said no snow there but lots of wind.

Just how many of these pictures do you still have? My wife just cracks up and loves every minute of it.
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Re: Idaman

Postby Ned Jr. » Tue Jan 25, 2011 12:46 am

Idaman wrote:What did I do to deserve this?

However, that is Pammy my first dog along with Sport our cowdog.

Hope all is very well with you and your fine cattle.

Talked to Jack G. a day or two ago and he said no snow there but lots of wind.

Just how many of these pictures do you still have? My wife just cracks up and loves every minute of it.


I just got that photo handed to me today. Thought you'd enjoy it. :D

I may be stretching it to say we've had 2 inches of moisture since last April, it's DRY!!! We've had a little snow lately but it looks just about like this photo I stole off Wikipedia here right now.

Image

I thought that photo was pretty cool. It was off Wikipedia under Westcliffe, even has my cows and one of our barns in it.

Cattle are doing great. I haven't fed them a bale of hay yet this winter if you can imagine. Bulls are selling like crazy this year also. We need some snow one of these days or we'll be in bad trouble. Still have March left so I'm trying not to worry.

Just to even things up some here's a picture of me and grandpa (you'll know witch one). I use to be a cute little be nice and old lady's liked to pinch my cheeks all the time. :D Only picture of me ever posted.
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Re: Idaman

Postby Idaman » Tue Jan 25, 2011 1:04 am

Loved the picture of you. Must be your conscience bothering you.

I too hope for snow for those peaks. That is always the worry. When I started out on Greenleaf Creek next to Jack G. in 1964 it was like that, no snow. That place put up 4,000 bales that year and 24,000 the next.

Congratulations on the bull sales but you have worked for it and deserve it.
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Re: Idaman

Postby Ned Jr. » Tue Jan 25, 2011 2:09 pm

Idaman wrote:Loved the picture of you. Must be your conscience bothering you.

I figured it might be a good idea if I evened the score up instead of you. ;-)

I too hope for snow for those peaks. That is always the worry. When I started out on Greenleaf Creek next to Jack G. in 1964 it was like that, no snow. That place put up 4,000 bales that year and 24,000 the next.

Do you have any stories about a year it looked just like that and then the snow and rains came and you put up 100,000 bales??? That the one I'd rather hear about. The ASCS had their annual meeting a few weeks ago and had the weather man from channel 11 as a guest speaker. I heard he told the crowd of ranchers that because of the La Nina we were in we would be in a major drought until 2014. I think they should have taken him out back and strung him up. They can never get the weather right for next week let alone three years from now. I don't think he should have told a group of ranchers that.

Congratulations on the bull sales but you have worked for it and deserve it.

Thanks. :D
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Re: Idaman

Postby Idaman » Tue Jan 25, 2011 4:21 pm

We never actually put up 100,000 on the Greenleaf alone. That number included the Greenleaf, the Hillside home ranch, the Hayden, and the Black place. As I remember that year the snow did come late.

It has always seemed to me that wherever you are the early snows are dry and just blow around all winter. The biggest benefit from them is in the drifts that are formed on the peaks.

In Idaho it is much the same except our peaks are much lower(less than 6,000'). When you get an early snow here then there always seems to be a warm rain come along and run most of the snow out as happened last week. We had a big runoff for several days but the drifts stayed and because of the rain and subsequent freeze they are now totally ice but we need more snow now to get back to where we were. The most beneficial snows here are the ones after Jan. 15. There is more moisture in them and they don't melt out. We usually start irrigating up here on the mountain ranch in early March as our creeks usually run out in June. Like there, we get one cutting of grass hay.

We are going to try something very new this year and that is pasturing the meadows during the month of April and then hoping it grows back enough to produce in June. Since we have to feed during April hopefully if we get lower production from the grazing it will be offset by the smaller amount of hay we will need to feed. We tried one meadow last year and were very pleased.

Our ranch here is in the middle of one of those areas that the USDA uses to collect rainfall and creek flow amounts. We have over 60 years of their data and that data is used in the National Weather Service projections each year. We live in a sagebrush high desert area where they say the annual precipitation is about 10” however in our summer and fall pastures only five miles away that amount raises to 38”. I wonder if that isn't also true in your peaks.

After working with the USDA people for several years I can sure see them telling the ranchers the worst scenario as they have no clue to private economics. A couple weeks ago we found some cattle still out on the mountain in the snow. After we drove them home we were visiting with some of the USDA people and they said “Oh yah we have been seeing those cows up there for a couple months.” They seemed to have never have thought of telling us. Total disconnect and they wonder why when they want us to give them some new access etc. we are very reluctant. Good neighbors, is a concept totally foreign to bureaucrats.
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Re: Idaman

Postby Idaman » Thu Jan 27, 2011 9:06 pm

Big Davey

Big Davey came by his name very naturally as he was 6'4” although very slender. Dave came to Empire for a riding job but luckily for us he had many other great talents. He had cowboy-ed at Douglas Lake, guided in the coastal mountains, cooked for hunting camps, welded, but mostly driven logging and dump trucks. He was a excellent driver and logged way over a million miles of accident free driving on some of the toughest roads anywhere. He went on to be a truck driving and safety consultant in the BC trucking industry.

One time when we were living, down along the river, in Idaho Davey stopped by on one of his cross country hauls and decided to leave his traveling companion Pilot with us until he made the round trip. He was going to Florida then up to New York and then back through Idaho to his home base in BC. From New York he needed to fly home to BC for a wedding and then back to New York. Pilot was a border collie that traveled many miles in the passenger seat of Daveys' trucks. While we were dog sitting Pilot we could only let him out of the kennel for a short time each day for fear that he would take off.

One afternoon my wife let him out for his run and had to step into the house for just a minute or two. While she was in there the phone rang and it was Davey calling from somewhere on the east coast saying that Pilot had run off. My wife had just seen him a minute or two before and asked Davey if he knew where he was and then he gave her the address and name of the people where he was. The address was right next to ours. We went right over there and retrieved Pilot and put him back in his kennel. The whole episode lasted less than 15 minutes. Pilot was wearing a collar with Daveys' number on it and when our neighbor saw him come into their yard they captured him and called the number on the collar. Davey knew before we did that Pilot had gone for a walk-about and also knew where he was. We just shook our heads in disbelief.

Later Davey stopped by another time but didn't have Pilot along. Upon questioning him about the absence of Pilot, Davey told how while down in Florida he was in a truck stop and went in for a shower. While he was showering Pilot tore out half of the lining of the sleeper in his new Kenworth. All Davey said was that he and Pilot had gotten a divorce at that time.

The other cowboys just loved having Davey along for the trek into the mountains because of his great cooking. Instead of spam, beans, some venison, and rice they could look forward to a real treat every evening. After having cooked for some guide hunting camps Davey could really come up with some great dishes from the barest of ingredients. For some time Davey acquired the urge to learn to play the guitar. After a lot of practice he became fairly proficient. So not only could he prepare a feast for the crew he could also entertain them after their delicious dinner. He did some singing along with the music but that just started the cow dogs howling.

Davey was also the one who was yelling up the stairs to Connie and me that Phyliss's water had broke and after waking us he stood around and wrung his hands just like the rest of the men.

Davey always had a great sense of humor and was up for any antics we could pull to get a laugh. One evening he was eating with us and one of the irrigators came to the back door to get the gas key. Since we were so far from town we always kept a big tank full and any of the employees could get gasoline by getting the key from our house and then writing the meter readings in a book at the tank. Then we would settle up at the end of the month at pay time.

As this man was coming to the door it hit me that we could all put on our cowboy hats sideways and then keep on eating and see how how would react. When he came in the door he immediately noticed one of with us the hat problem. His eyes opened a little but as he looked at each of us in our hats his eyes got larger and larger. When he had looked at everyone he started backing toward the door without ever turning around to leave. He reached behind his back to open the door and then he backed on out. I am sure he was shaking his head all the way back to his car. This man was probably a couple bricks short of a full pallet but I am sure that is what he thought about us that night.
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Re: Idaman

Postby gbrumbelow » Thu Feb 10, 2011 9:47 pm

To all Idaman's readers, friends, and fans,

It grieves me to inform you that our friend, Idaman, passed away two days ago, Tuesday, February 8, as a result of a stroke. He and his bride of 48 years were wintering on the Oregon coast at the time of his death. At her request I am alerting the readers of his board.

For 32 years it was my privilege to know this prince of a man--a gentleman, adventurer, cattleman, beloved father and husband, and a loyal friend to many people all over the West. In every one of those categories he was a giant. I have never known the likes of him and I don't expect to again.

If you read his posts thoroughly and carefully, it will not surprise you to know that, in addition to the above, he was also a churchman. In fact, he served more than one rural congregation as leader and occasional preacher, this on top of all the other remarkable achievements of his amazing life.

Idaman was 70 years old, but he was far too young to die. That's how I feel about it, because we all will miss him so keenly. But while his passing is, to us, a death, it was for him, a promotion to the glory he knew was awaiting him, not because of his own merit, but because of the merit of One who was nailed to a wooden cross outside ancient Jerusalem 2,000 years ago.

Idaman would want me to thank you so much; your readership of his stories meant the world to him. A couple of months ago we started working together to pull these stories into a book. The completion of that project will be a big priority to his wife, his sons, and me. If you would like to be kept aware of the progress of that book, please contact me at the email address below and I will see that you are kept informed.

Although I am a registered user of these boards, I don't often log on, so if you want to get through to me for any reason related to the above, please email me at gbrumbelow@gmail.com.
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Re: Idaman

Postby Angus Cowman » Thu Feb 10, 2011 10:08 pm

I feel priviledged to have known him if only thru this forum and I feel the world has lost a truly good person and a great knowledge of the cattle world
our deepest sympathies for his family and friends that knew him well
He will be greatly missed and he leaves a hole in this world that can never be filled
Now he is tending to the lords herd in the sky with all of the other great cowmen that have passed before him
God Bless
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