Page 1 of 1

Cattle worming question

Posted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 9:26 pm
by quartermeter
Can I use a drench internal wormer and a pour on wormer at the same time on cattle?

Re: Cattle worming question

Posted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 9:40 pm
by jerry27150
use one or the other not both

Re: Cattle worming question

Posted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 5:11 pm
by Jeanne - Simme Valley
Actually, yes you can use both. Some drenches hit several different things that a pour-on does not. I will add that you may not want to hit them with too much else.

Re: Cattle worming question

Posted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 5:22 pm
by Bright Raven
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:Actually, yes you can use both. Some drenches hit several different things that a pour-on does not. I will add that you may not want to hit them with too much else.


I just used both this week on my friend's herd.

You are correct.

Re: Cattle worming question

Posted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 5:40 pm
by Jeanne - Simme Valley
Bright Raven wrote:
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:Actually, yes you can use both. Some drenches hit several different things that a pour-on does not. I will add that you may not want to hit them with too much else.


I just used both this week on my friend's herd.

You are correct.

Thanks. Actually, I was expecting to get chastised for telling them that. :banana:

Re: Cattle worming question

Posted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 5:48 pm
by Bright Raven
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:Actually, yes you can use both. Some drenches hit several different things that a pour-on does not. I will add that you may not want to hit them with too much else.


I just used both this week on my friend's herd.

You are correct.

Thanks. Actually, I was expecting to get chastised for telling them that. :banana:


The oral drenches do not cover ectoparasites like mites, ticks, lice, etc. They are focused on intestinal round worms and lung worms. I wanted to be sure I got the endoparasites so I used synanthic (oxfendaxole). He had a pour on left over so I told him to pour while I drenched. Not a big deal. Totally different
routes of delivery and different pharmaceuticals.

Re: Cattle worming question

Posted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 9:42 pm
by Cucumber35
I just used a pour on for the whole herd, as much for flies, lice and mites as worms. Calves also got an injectable since I feel it's more effective for internal parasites. Especially since we had a threat of rain that could have affected the pour on. Cows should be more resistant already than the calves.

Re: Cattle worming question

Posted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 9:53 pm
by Lucky_P
While I'm not a fan of the pour-ons - they're really an abysmally poor way to deworm an animal; efficacy is pretty poor (I don't know how they managed to get approval to market them, they're so poor) - but utilizing dewormers from both the benzimidazole and macrocyclic lactone classes, at the same time, has been shown to be very effective at reducing fecal egg counts and improving weight gain in stocker and yearling animals - at half the cost associated with the new LongRange product.
Deworming with a benzimidazole like Panacur/Safeguard or Synanthic, along with Ivomec or Cydectin, at the same time, is a good strategy... I do it routinely now for youngstock - but I use an injectible in the ivermectin/moxidectin product.

Re: Cattle worming question

Posted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 5:39 am
by cowgirl8
We always do pour on in the spring because it is a really good fly repellant. Then in the fall we either do drench or injection, we alternate those. If the flies are bad, we'll do pour on again in the summer.

Re: Cattle worming question

Posted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 10:31 am
by Lucky_P
While I'm an ardent proponent that any $ spent on hornfly control will return far greater returns than the same $ spent on internal parasite control for cattle... the use of a pour-on anthelminthic for 'fly control' is, IMO, a really poor use of a resource that needs to be conserved. Talk about accelerating selection for resistant populations of nematode parasites...

Re: Cattle worming question

Posted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 11:18 am
by Bright Raven
Lucky_P wrote:While I'm an ardent proponent that any $ spent on hornfly control will return far greater returns than the same $ spent on internal parasite control for cattle... the use of a pour-on anthelminthic for 'fly control' is, IMO, a really poor use of a resource that needs to be conserved. Talk about accelerating selection for resistant populations of nematode parasites...


Same thought went through my head.

Re: Cattle worming question

Posted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 12:42 pm
by cowgirl8
Lucky_P wrote:While I'm an ardent proponent that any $ spent on hornfly control will return far greater returns than the same $ spent on internal parasite control for cattle... the use of a pour-on anthelminthic for 'fly control' is, IMO, a really poor use of a resource that needs to be conserved. Talk about accelerating selection for resistant populations of nematode parasites...

We don't use it for fly control unless late in the summer the flies are bad and usually its on the bulls when we put them back in their pasture on their off season. We use it in the spring to worm because that's when flies are bad, thus, you kill 2 birds with one stone. It wouldn't make sense to use it in the fall because there are no flies, but if you worm twice a year, why not use it when flies are bad?

Re: Cattle worming question

Posted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 7:54 am
by midTN_Brangusman
cowgirl8 wrote:
Lucky_P wrote:While I'm an ardent proponent that any $ spent on hornfly control will return far greater returns than the same $ spent on internal parasite control for cattle... the use of a pour-on anthelminthic for 'fly control' is, IMO, a really poor use of a resource that needs to be conserved. Talk about accelerating selection for resistant populations of nematode parasites...

We don't use it for fly control unless late in the summer the flies are bad and usually its on the bulls when we put them back in their pasture on their off season. We use it in the spring to worm because that's when flies are bad, thus, you kill 2 birds with one stone. It wouldn't make sense to use it in the fall because there are no flies, but if you worm twice a year, why not use it when flies are bad?



We do the same here cowgirl! :cboy: