Feed Pad

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ky colonel
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Re: Feed Pad

Postby ky colonel » Fri Feb 09, 2018 12:54 pm

how does it save more by rolling out? i would like to see more pics of the feed pad. i need something i end up in a muddy mess. thought about dropping rolls off in pasture at different locations to spread that manure around by the professionals.
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Re: Feed Pad

Postby Bright Raven » Fri Feb 09, 2018 12:59 pm

Ky hills wrote:Feed pads are nice, have a that kind of setup behind the barn where we can let cattle in from 3 fields to eat grain, also have a couple fields with them to feed hay on, for the same reasons that Bright Raven stated. About midway through last winter, I realized I was going through hay pretty fast trying to set out enough to last 2-3 days, SkyHighTree suggested I unroll it, and have been doing that ever since. For some of the cattle groups, it puts me to doing it every day, and others about every other day, but it has really saved the hay, and doesn't seem like they are wasting it near as bad. It can get kind of hairy if it's very muddy or snow/ice but I try to stay on the gravel road, at least with one side of the tractor so the hay doesn't get dropped off down it a rutted out track, or in other places without a road on flat part of a ridge, and push the hay roll over the hill.
On a side note that manure and from hay feeding pads makes some fine stuff to spread on hay fields and garden.


In the area where you unroll it - don't the cows make a muddy mess of the ground? Resulting in damaging the pasture or do you have an area you sacrifice for unrolling?
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Re: Feed Pad

Postby Ohio Cowboy » Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:18 pm

BR- when you clean off your pad do you pull up a ton of stone ??? I feel like it would be like spreading stone on my pastures.
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Re: Feed Pad

Postby Bright Raven » Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:23 pm

Ohio Cowboy wrote:BR- when you clean off your pad do you pull up a ton of stone ??? I feel like it would be like spreading stone on my pastures.


No. Not much but it does pull some up - very few. What I wonder is whether the few stones it pulls up might be thrown into your tractor cab glass. We had a manure spreader when I was growing up. The paddles would throw some up to the front.

I am careful to keep the bucket riding above the stone,
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Ky hills
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Re: Feed Pad

Postby Ky hills » Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:24 pm

Bright Raven wrote:
Ky hills wrote:Feed pads are nice, have a that kind of setup behind the barn where we can let cattle in from 3 fields to eat grain, also have a couple fields with them to feed hay on, for the same reasons that Bright Raven stated. About midway through last winter, I realized I was going through hay pretty fast trying to set out enough to last 2-3 days, SkyHighTree suggested I unroll it, and have been doing that ever since. For some of the cattle groups, it puts me to doing it every day, and others about every other day, but it has really saved the hay, and doesn't seem like they are wasting it near as bad. It can get kind of hairy if it's very muddy or snow/ice but I try to stay on the gravel road, at least with one side of the tractor so the hay doesn't get dropped off down it a rutted out track, or in other places without a road on flat part of a ridge, and push the hay roll over the hill.
On a side note that manure and from hay feeding pads makes some fine stuff to spread on hay fields and garden.


In the area where you unroll it - don't the cows make a muddy mess of the ground? Resulting in damaging the pasture or do you have an area you sacrifice for unrolling?


They do make a muddy mess, but I unroll it if possible in a fresh space and then they only trample around that area for a few hours. I am limited in where I can safely unroll so in a sense it is more or less sacrificing an area and in some places it is unrolled over the same area. I have found that years ago when I fed that way, my hay was just stored outside and then there would be the outside part that was not eaten, and then would just be a place for weeds to grow later in the summer. Now my hay is mostly stored inside and they are getting the benefit of the whole roll and not leaving it. I had wondered last year if would damage the ground but by summer it wasn't very noticeable at all, unless it was in a heavily used area.
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Re: Feed Pad

Postby Bright Raven » Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:26 pm

Ky hills wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
Ky hills wrote:Feed pads are nice, have a that kind of setup behind the barn where we can let cattle in from 3 fields to eat grain, also have a couple fields with them to feed hay on, for the same reasons that Bright Raven stated. About midway through last winter, I realized I was going through hay pretty fast trying to set out enough to last 2-3 days, SkyHighTree suggested I unroll it, and have been doing that ever since. For some of the cattle groups, it puts me to doing it every day, and others about every other day, but it has really saved the hay, and doesn't seem like they are wasting it near as bad. It can get kind of hairy if it's very muddy or snow/ice but I try to stay on the gravel road, at least with one side of the tractor so the hay doesn't get dropped off down it a rutted out track, or in other places without a road on flat part of a ridge, and push the hay roll over the hill.
On a side note that manure and from hay feeding pads makes some fine stuff to spread on hay fields and garden.


In the area where you unroll it - don't the cows make a muddy mess of the ground? Resulting in damaging the pasture or do you have an area you sacrifice for unrolling?


They do make a muddy mess, but I unroll it if possible in a fresh space and then they only trample around that area for a few hours. I am limited in where I can safely unroll so in a sense it is more or less sacrificing an area and in some places it is unrolled over the same area. I have found that years ago when I fed that way, my hay was just stored outside and then there would be the outside part that was not eaten, and then would just be a place for weeds to grow later in the summer. Now my hay is mostly stored inside and they are getting the benefit of the whole roll and not leaving it. I had wondered last year if would damage the ground but by summer it wasn't very noticeable at all, unless it was in a heavily used area.


Thanks. I hate to damage pasture.
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Ky hills
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Re: Feed Pad

Postby Ky hills » Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:31 pm

ky colonel wrote:how does it save more by rolling out? i would like to see more pics of the feed pad. i need something i end up in a muddy mess. thought about dropping rolls off in pasture at different locations to spread that manure around by the professionals.


For me it was saving hay by limiting it. I was setting out 2-4 rolls at a time depending on the number of cattle, and hoping it would last them for 2 or 3 days, but they would demolish it almost the first day, so then when I just started unrolling 1 per day, they all had room to eat. There still is some waste to it but I don't think it's near as much as before.
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Re: Feed Pad

Postby Ky hills » Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:38 pm

Bright Raven wrote:
Ky hills wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
In the area where you unroll it - don't the cows make a muddy mess of the ground? Resulting in damaging the pasture or do you have an area you sacrifice for unrolling?


They do make a muddy mess, but I unroll it if possible in a fresh space and then they only trample around that area for a few hours. I am limited in where I can safely unroll so in a sense it is more or less sacrificing an area and in some places it is unrolled over the same area. I have found that years ago when I fed that way, my hay was just stored outside and then there would be the outside part that was not eaten, and then would just be a place for weeds to grow later in the summer. Now my hay is mostly stored inside and they are getting the benefit of the whole roll and not leaving it. I had wondered last year if would damage the ground but by summer it wasn't very noticeable at all, unless it was in a heavily used area.


Thanks. I hate to damage pasture.


I agree and I think that the feeding pads are the best way to go in that regard, if you have the equipment and time to keep them maintained. I don't really have the right kind of equipment to keep them cleaned off like they should be and then when it gets dry enough that I can use my loader tractor I'm needing to do other jobs.
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Re: Feed Pad

Postby Bigfoot » Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:41 pm

Blows my mind, when I see people post that they successfully unroll hay. I can see it working in a dryer climate, but it just doesn't work on my place. Myself, and everybody else hates a nosey question, but I wonder how many head, people are unrolling for.
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Ky hills
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Re: Feed Pad

Postby Ky hills » Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:59 pm

Bigfoot wrote:Blows my mind, when I see people post that they successfully unroll hay. I can see it working in a dryer climate, but it just doesn't work on my place. Myself, and everybody else hates a nosey question, but I wonder how many head, people are unrolling for.


It ain't always successful sometimes ends up with a roll at the bottom of the hill, or in a pond :hide: :lol2:
Not answering to be boastful as I'm sure I'm on the smaller scale of folks here, but I'm unrolling daily to a group of 20 cows and 2 bulls, a group of 35, 600lbs heifers, and every other day to 9.
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Re: Feed Pad

Postby Supa Dexta » Fri Feb 09, 2018 2:02 pm

I have over a couple hundred feet of concrete and adding more all the time.

Out west they feed hundreds/ thousands by rolling out, or with bale processors making rows.. But the ground is either dry or frozen.

I'd not only have the cows in mud, I'd likely have the tractor stuck.
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Re: Feed Pad

Postby True Grit Farms » Fri Feb 09, 2018 2:12 pm

Bigfoot wrote:Blows my mind, when I see people post that they successfully unroll hay. I can see it working in a dryer climate, but it just doesn't work on my place. Myself, and everybody else hates a nosey question, but I wonder how many head, people are unrolling for.

I'll unroll 4 rolls a day and if it's going to be cold I'll unroll 6 rolls for a 100 head. I can fix ruts cheaper than I can buy hay.
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Re: Feed Pad

Postby NonTypicalCPA » Fri Feb 09, 2018 3:07 pm

I have a similar feed pad/dry lot. I used the fines from crushed concrete from a local pit that gets the concrete when the highway is being replaced. It has the texture of sand, but sets up firm like concrete. Another option if it's in your area and it has no stones.
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Re: Feed Pad

Postby J&D Cattle » Fri Feb 09, 2018 3:47 pm

Bigfoot wrote:Blows my mind, when I see people post that they successfully unroll hay. I can see it working in a dryer climate, but it just doesn't work on my place. Myself, and everybody else hates a nosey question, but I wonder how many head, people are unrolling for.


I've been unrolling for 18 head at the house and I didn't feel they were cleaning it up as well as in the past. I've went to rings and am giving them 2 bales every 3 days. I'm supplementing at around 5lbs of gluten every other day as well. Last year they slicked up a bale a day and all was well. Different hay supplier and I haven't weighed them but did test which is why I'm supplementing protein.
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Re: Feed Pad

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Fri Feb 09, 2018 5:43 pm

Bigfoot wrote:Blows my mind, when I see people post that they successfully unroll hay. I can see it working in a dryer climate, but it just doesn't work on my place. Myself, and everybody else hates a nosey question, but I wonder how many head, people are unrolling for.

I totally agree. There are times of the year, like now, the ground is totally frozen. But, next week it might not be.
Plus, I don't have any area that I could successfully unroll a bale without it ending up in swamp or a fence. :shock:
I finally put a couple of gravel pads in. We don't have to drive the tractor in with the cattle at all. The round feeders are up against 3 wooden posts so they don't short out on the fence. I drive up to the fence & reach over the fence to feed the bales in the feeders. Cattle can get around about 80% of the bale. Occasionally, I have to "push" the left over bale away from the fence side.
We used to drive into the "sacrificed" winter lots & feed in the round feeders. then you would have to move it because it would get sooooo muddy. The tractor would make as much muddied up areas as the cows. Now, there is virtually NO muddy areas in their winter lots. Contractors around here use limestone dust to top off a gravel area.
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