Fat Cows

Cattle problems.
boondocks
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Re: Fat Cows

Postby boondocks » Sat May 26, 2018 12:41 am

I couldn't see the pics. :(
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Jeanne - Simme Valley
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Re: Fat Cows

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Sat May 26, 2018 5:18 am

They are still there on my computer this morning.
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Re: Fat Cows

Postby angus9259 » Sat May 26, 2018 6:58 am

This is the exact boat I find myself in every year. I fall calve as well. It's a function of fall calving I think. No world is perfect. What I've gone to is retaining my calves and putting them on pasture as well and selling the calves in the summer. Keeps the pasture in check to some extent. But cattle will flush with all that grass. It is what it is.
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Re: Fat Cows

Postby kenny thomas » Sat May 26, 2018 7:21 am

Bright Raven wrote:
callmefence wrote:
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:fence - you talking to me? If so, I "mostly" calve 1-1 to 3-10 with a small group (10 this year) in the fall.


No ma'am.
I was talking to Raven.. his cow's get to fat every year on his high caliber Kentucky grass.
But he fall calves. The solution seems obvious to me.


Andy, I am 100% AI. For 2 reasons: 1. I enjoy the process. 2. It relieves me of the cost and management of a bull.

As a result of doing all AI, I found in my area, heat detection and access to the facility is difficult and frustrating during the spring. When it warms up and the grass comes on, the cows become inaccessible for AI. They spend their time in remote areas and get down in the hollers. To have spring calves on my farm would require a bull. Therefore, I went to all fall calving. All my calves are born in September and October. I begin my AI breeding on Thanksgiving. The cows are on hay, they stay close to the headquarters, and Heat detection is easy. When I need to AI, it is easy to move them into the facility.

No way I will ever go back to spring calving!

In fescue areas why would you be feeding hay at Thanksgiving. You need to manage your grass and feed hay in February and March.
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Re: Fat Cows

Postby TennesseeTuxedo » Sat May 26, 2018 7:29 am

kenny thomas wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
callmefence wrote:
No ma'am.
I was talking to Raven.. his cow's get to fat every year on his high caliber Kentucky grass.
But he fall calves. The solution seems obvious to me.


Andy, I am 100% AI. For 2 reasons: 1. I enjoy the process. 2. It relieves me of the cost and management of a bull.

As a result of doing all AI, I found in my area, heat detection and access to the facility is difficult and frustrating during the spring. When it warms up and the grass comes on, the cows become inaccessible for AI. They spend their time in remote areas and get down in the hollers. To have spring calves on my farm would require a bull. Therefore, I went to all fall calving. All my calves are born in September and October. I begin my AI breeding on Thanksgiving. The cows are on hay, they stay close to the headquarters, and Heat detection is easy. When I need to AI, it is easy to move them into the facility.

No way I will ever go back to spring calving!

In fescue areas why would you be feeding hay at Thanksgiving. You need to manage your grass and feed hay in February and March.


We fed hay November through April this year. Grass was slow to grow this spring.
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Re: Fat Cows

Postby ALACOWMAN » Sat May 26, 2018 7:44 am

It wanted to grow, but winter wouldn't let it.. Those extended frosts we kept having we're kicking it's butt..
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Re: Fat Cows

Postby Bright Raven » Sat May 26, 2018 11:38 am

kenny thomas wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
callmefence wrote:
No ma'am.
I was talking to Raven.. his cow's get to fat every year on his high caliber Kentucky grass.
But he fall calves. The solution seems obvious to me.


Andy, I am 100% AI. For 2 reasons: 1. I enjoy the process. 2. It relieves me of the cost and management of a bull.

As a result of doing all AI, I found in my area, heat detection and access to the facility is difficult and frustrating during the spring. When it warms up and the grass comes on, the cows become inaccessible for AI. They spend their time in remote areas and get down in the hollers. To have spring calves on my farm would require a bull. Therefore, I went to all fall calving. All my calves are born in September and October. I begin my AI breeding on Thanksgiving. The cows are on hay, they stay close to the headquarters, and Heat detection is easy. When I need to AI, it is easy to move them into the facility.

No way I will ever go back to spring calving!

In fescue areas why would you be feeding hay at Thanksgiving. You need to manage your grass and feed hay in February and March.


I have used that practice. The other practice I use is - starting hay at Thanksgiving. Feeding through February. Which allows me to have easy access to the cows for breeding. Then put them out on stockpiled grass to hold them until the grass takes off.
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Re: Fat Cows

Postby alisonb » Sat May 26, 2018 12:18 pm

They look good Ron, wouldn't be worrying if I was you.
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Re: Fat Cows

Postby callmefence » Sat May 26, 2018 12:55 pm

Bright Raven wrote:
callmefence wrote:
Jeanne - Simme Valley wrote:fence - you talking to me? If so, I "mostly" calve 1-1 to 3-10 with a small group (10 this year) in the fall.


No ma'am.
I was talking to Raven.. his cow's get to fat every year on his high caliber Kentucky grass.
But he fall calves. The solution seems obvious to me.


Andy, I am 100% AI. For 2 reasons: 1. I enjoy the process. 2. It relieves me of the cost and management of a bull.

As a result of doing all AI, I found in my area, heat detection and access to the facility is difficult and frustrating during the spring. When it warms up and the grass comes on, the cows become inaccessible for AI. They spend their time in remote areas and get down in the hollers. To have spring calves on my farm would require a bull. Therefore, I went to all fall calving. All my calves are born in September and October. I begin my AI breeding on Thanksgiving. The cows are on hay, they stay close to the headquarters, and Heat detection is easy. When I need to AI, it is easy to move them into the facility.

No way I will ever go back to spring calving!


Well their your cows....you have every right to do it all wrong.............wink
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You can all go to he// . I'll go to Texas.
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Re: Fat Cows

Postby wbvs58 » Sat May 26, 2018 4:33 pm

Well Ron I think you are just gonna have to deal with your "annual fear", you have been given a solution but it doesn't suit you to change and you are doing good with what you do so you just gotta work on that "fear" now. Just have to keep working on that mower, have you thought of a flail type mower that will mulch the grass rather than windrow it to give more rapid break down of cut material back to your soil?

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Re: Fat Cows

Postby Stocker Steve » Sat May 26, 2018 4:43 pm

Bright Raven wrote:I am having my annual bout of fear over fat cows. Grass on the farm is extremely good. It got a slow start but is now about as good as I have seen.


Sounds like your herd intake is not balanced with the grass production.

The standard recommendation is to have a temporary or seasonal herd. Usually retained calves or yearlings. When to you wean?

The other approach is to park the mower and cross fence, so the cows can trample more grass. This will generate new soil much faster than mowing.
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Jeanne - Simme Valley
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Re: Fat Cows

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Sat May 26, 2018 4:49 pm

With a registered herd, for bio security, I would never run stockers on my property.
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Re: Fat Cows

Postby True Grit Farms » Sat May 26, 2018 4:54 pm

I personally can't understand the way some folks think. If he's happy and his fat cows are happy what does it matter how he manages his property. But since he does use cost share money, maybe the government needs to conduct a study on obese cattle and it's effects on the health of the cattle.
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Re: Fat Cows

Postby Banjo » Sat May 26, 2018 5:09 pm

Getting fat on grass is different than fat on corn/soybean meal. My cows look good right now too with lots of grass, but not butterball fat.
Right now I am rotating my herd on 30% of the farm and letting the other 70% percent just grow....I will clip/bushhog it 2 or 3 times between now and Fall. and let it lay. This fall the fescue will come on and just about take them thru the winter. Last year I fed hay around 30 to 40 days.
In the meantime I keep more heifers and grow the herd.....shooting for 1.5 acres to 1 adult cow, right now I'm at about 2 to 1.
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Re: Fat Cows

Postby Bright Raven » Sat May 26, 2018 6:30 pm

Stocker Steve wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:I am having my annual bout of fear over fat cows. Grass on the farm is extremely good. It got a slow start but is now about as good as I have seen.


Sounds like your herd intake is not balanced with the grass production.

The standard recommendation is to have a temporary or seasonal herd. Usually retained calves or yearlings. When to you wean?

The other approach is to park the mower and cross fence, so the cows can trample more grass. This will generate new soil much faster than mowing.


My calves were born September and October. This year I weaned the third week of March.
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