Hoof - white or black

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Bright Raven
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Re: Hoof - white or black

Postby Bright Raven » Fri Aug 17, 2018 3:01 pm

MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF HOOF HORN, SOLE HAEMORRHAGE AND
LAMENESS IN DAIRY CATTLE
by
BETINA WINKLER
A thesis submitted to the University of Plymouth in partial fulfilment for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
Department of Biological Sciences
Faculty of Science

July; 2005

Page 38:
The colour of the hoof horn was reported to have an influence over the bruising of the
horn, with a lower incidence of lameness and less bruising of the sole being found on cows with black hoof pigmentation (Logue et al., 1994). According to Leopold and Prietz (1980), hoof horn with pigmentation presented a lower capacity to absorb water (27.4 vs. 29.0%) and a lower wear rate (38.6 vs. 41.4%) compared to nonpigmented horn. However, Hepbum et al. (2004) reported that non-pigmented claw wall horn in cattle was
significantly harder
(46.5 vs. 40.3 nearer the coronary line and 68.5 vs. 64.8 away from the coronary line) in areas up to 4.5 cm under the coronary horn when compared to pigmented horn. No difference was measured in the dry matter of these horn samples.

Page 86:
According to Clark and Rakes (1982) hoof horn pigmentation did not affect hoof horn
hardness
. However, Hepbum et al. (2004) reported that non-pigmented claw wall horn in cattle was significantly harder (46.5 vs. 40.3 nearer the coronary line and 68.5 vs. 64.8 away from the coronary line) in areas up to 4.5 cm under the coronary horn when
compared to pigmented horn.


Page 91:
No significant difference was obtained between the elastic modulus of pigmented and non-pigmented hoof horn samples of horses (Douglas et al., 1996; Hinterhofer et al., 1998; Ley et al., 1998).
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Re: Hoof - white or black

Postby Bright Raven » Fri Aug 17, 2018 3:11 pm

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3227587/

Abstract

Claw disorders cause problems in dairy cattle all over the world. Nutrition, feeding, environment, claw trimming routines, hormonal changes related to calving and genetics are among the factors which influence the pathogenesis. The colour of the claw horn (pigmentation) has been suggested to play a role. The aim of this study was to investigate if there were any associations between the colour of the sole horn and claw disorders detected at claw trimming. Altogether, 2607 cows on 112 farms were claw trimmed once and the colour (dark, mixed or light) of the right lateral hind claw and hind claw disorders were recorded by 13 trained claw trimmers. The data were analysed using logistic regression models with logit link function, binomial distribution and herd and claw trimmer as repeated effects, with herd nested within claw trimmer. Haemorrhages of the sole (HS) and white line (HWL) were more frequently found in light than in dark claws (OR = 2.61 and 2.34, respectively). Both HS (OR = 1.43) and corkscrewed claws (OR = 1.84) were slightly more prevalent among cows which had claws with mixed colour versus dark claws. There were no significant associations of other claw disorders with claw horn colour.
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Re: Hoof - white or black

Postby Bright Raven » Fri Aug 17, 2018 3:33 pm

Farm Fence Solutions wrote:When I was in shoeing school, we put the hooves of several horses in a metered shop press. Black and white hooves from the same end of the same animal kind of thing. It was a dead split. Half the time, a black hoof would fail first, half the time white. Of course, there was no way to gauge sensitivity, but we did figure out how to gauge the pressure it took to shove a coffin bone out the bottom. Later in life, I talked a vet into doing it while watching with a fluoroscope after the necropsy was complete. It was very interesting to see the failure of the sensitive and insensitive lamina in real time. I would bet that the results of our experiments will never be officially recognized, but that's the conclusion we came to, right or wrong.

Edit to add: The horses were dead before we took their feet off and put them in the press.


I hope so. :cboy:
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Re: Hoof - white or black

Postby Boot Jack Bulls » Fri Aug 17, 2018 4:25 pm

Bright Raven wrote:
Farm Fence Solutions wrote:When I was in shoeing school, we put the hooves of several horses in a metered shop press. Black and white hooves from the same end of the same animal kind of thing. It was a dead split. Half the time, a black hoof would fail first, half the time white. Of course, there was no way to gauge sensitivity, but we did figure out how to gauge the pressure it took to shove a coffin bone out the bottom. Later in life, I talked a vet into doing it while watching with a fluoroscope after the necropsy was complete. It was very interesting to see the failure of the sensitive and insensitive lamina in real time. I would bet that the results of our experiments will never be officially recognized, but that's the conclusion we came to, right or wrong.

Edit to add: The horses were dead before we took their feet off and put them in the press.


I hope so. :cboy:


I recently saw a picture shared of a live horse who had just experienced a failure, where the coffin bone had pierced the sole (about 1/2 inch was visible)... as a horse owner, it was heart wrenching to see.

As to the original point, I see a difference in strength with our goats as well. I have observed that the dark horn stays harder and maintains its shape much better. With our dark hoof goats, we have to wait until we have a stretch of wet weather to soften them enough to trim them, this is not the case with our white hoof goats (except in the case of our bucks, they have to be softened to trim no matter the color!). Aside from using a grinder on a mature buck, we trim with a manual shears, so it is quite obvious when the horn it much harder or thicker. It is possible that the difference is more noticeable in goats because they have more depth of heel and more vertical hoof walls.
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Re: Hoof - white or black

Postby Bright Raven » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:02 pm

Boot Jack Bulls wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
Farm Fence Solutions wrote:When I was in shoeing school, we put the hooves of several horses in a metered shop press. Black and white hooves from the same end of the same animal kind of thing. It was a dead split. Half the time, a black hoof would fail first, half the time white. Of course, there was no way to gauge sensitivity, but we did figure out how to gauge the pressure it took to shove a coffin bone out the bottom. Later in life, I talked a vet into doing it while watching with a fluoroscope after the necropsy was complete. It was very interesting to see the failure of the sensitive and insensitive lamina in real time. I would bet that the results of our experiments will never be officially recognized, but that's the conclusion we came to, right or wrong.

Edit to add: The horses were dead before we took their feet off and put them in the press.


I hope so. :cboy:


I recently saw a picture shared of a live horse who had just experienced a failure, where the coffin bone had pierced the sole (about 1/2 inch was visible)... as a horse owner, it was heart wrenching to see.

As to the original point, I see a difference in strength with our goats as well. I have observed that the dark horn stays harder and maintains its shape much better. With our dark hoof goats, we have to wait until we have a stretch of wet weather to soften them enough to trim them, this is not the case with our white hoof goats (except in the case of our bucks, they have to be softened to trim no matter the color!). Aside from using a grinder on a mature buck, we trim with a manual shears, so it is quite obvious when the horn it much harder or thicker. It is possible that the difference is more noticeable in goats because they have more depth of heel and more vertical hoof walls.


Boot Jack Bulls,

Did you get a chance to read those publications posted by redcowsrule? Please draw your own conclusions, but in cows, the differences between black pigmented and non-pigmented hoof horn is not statistically significant. I think redcowsrule made a significant point when he posted:

I think we need to worry less about hoof color and more about quality/conformation.
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Re: Hoof - white or black

Postby Boot Jack Bulls » Fri Aug 17, 2018 5:10 pm

No, I have not read it. I will when the mood strikes me. To be honest, it won't likely change my personal opinion on the matter. I rely on my own experiences first. I personally find that the color often correlates with the quality or lack thereof. Thanks for the passive advice though....
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Re: Hoof - white or black

Postby Farm Fence Solutions » Fri Aug 17, 2018 6:39 pm

Boot Jack Bulls wrote:
Bright Raven wrote:
Farm Fence Solutions wrote:When I was in shoeing school, we put the hooves of several horses in a metered shop press. Black and white hooves from the same end of the same animal kind of thing. It was a dead split. Half the time, a black hoof would fail first, half the time white. Of course, there was no way to gauge sensitivity, but we did figure out how to gauge the pressure it took to shove a coffin bone out the bottom. Later in life, I talked a vet into doing it while watching with a fluoroscope after the necropsy was complete. It was very interesting to see the failure of the sensitive and insensitive lamina in real time. I would bet that the results of our experiments will never be officially recognized, but that's the conclusion we came to, right or wrong.

Edit to add: The horses were dead before we took their feet off and put them in the press.


I hope so. :cboy:


I recently saw a picture shared of a live horse who had just experienced a failure, where the coffin bone had pierced the sole (about 1/2 inch was visible)... as a horse owner, it was heart wrenching to see.



If you think that's something, you ought to see one slough a hoof capsule....or four....and recover. When the dog brought me the second one, I knew it was trouble.
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Re: Hoof - white or black

Postby elkwc » Fri Aug 17, 2018 8:02 pm

Bright Raven I shared my experiences on the other thread so won't post it again. And having been raised where I've had experience running cattle in very rocky, rough ground and also in sandy ground I'm like Boot Jack Bulls. I will likely continue to choose the animal with a colored hoof if they are equal. Again a PB breeder IMO should raise what a commercial breeder desires not what some scientific study might suggest is ok. I know there are other breeders that think like I do but also many of them I knew are herding cattle in lush pastures above. I doubt you will find many that even look at the color of the hoof. I find that I pay way more attention to how an animal travels and their feet and legs than most. I attribute that to the way I was raised and having seen so many issues as a horse shoer caused by structural issues.
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Re: Hoof - white or black

Postby Bright Raven » Fri Aug 17, 2018 8:20 pm

elkwc wrote:Bright Raven I shared my experiences on the other thread so won't post it again. And having been raised where I've had experience running cattle in very rocky, rough ground and also in sandy ground I'm like Boot Jack Bulls. I will likely continue to choose the animal with a colored hoof if they are equal. Again a PB breeder IMO should raise what a commercial breeder desires not what some scientific study might suggest is ok. I know there are other breeders that think like I do but also many of them I knew are herding cattle in lush pastures above. I doubt you will find many that even look at the color of the hoof. I find that I pay way more attention to how an animal travels and their feet and legs than most. I attribute that to the way I was raised and having seen so many issues as a horse shoer caused by structural issues.


I agree. I thought your post on the other thread was very useful. There should not be anything different in the keratin based on the presence of absence of pigment and that is kinda what the publication conclude. However, personal experience is difficult to trump.
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