Feeder calves

Cattle problems.
Bob

Feeder calves

Postby Bob » Thu Jun 10, 1999 10:13 am

Has anyone had any experience with recieving feeder calves on the farm for backgrounding. How to you manage stress? What kind of feeding practices should you use to make sure the cattle make the transition smoothly?
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Phil in MS

Re: Feeder calves

Postby Phil in MS » Thu Jun 10, 1999 1:45 pm

(User Above) wrote:: Has anyone had any experience with recieving feeder calves on the farm for backgrounding. How to you manage stress? What kind of feeding practices should you use to make sure the cattle make the transition smoothly?<p>I'm not sure about rations! Check with your county<br>agent, area livestock specialist and your local <br>vet with these questions! It would also be good<br>business to speak to some local cattlemen that <br>have done what your planning to do!<p>I'm sure you should keep your calves in a receiving<br>pen/pasture until they are eating and drinking well!<br>Place all feed and water troughs perpendicular to <br>your fences! New calves will walk your fences and<br>this way they'll find water and feed sooner!

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phil.swords@bxs.com
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Janet

Re: Feeder calves

Postby Janet » Thu Jun 10, 1999 9:43 pm

I get feeders in every year in the fall. First off after one disasterous year with shipping fever now I always buy locally and not through auctions. We have no problems now with shipping fever and the animals aren't stressed too much.I always make sure that I talk to the farmer that I buy from when I look at the calves. I note what they are eating as well as when and I do the same until they are settled in well then I slowly change feed times or rations.I don't believe in preventative antibiotics so I watch the new arrivals very well for any signs of illness, I only treat if there are symptoms.Another thing is to make sure you have a quarantine pen and use it. Keep the new arrivals seperate for a few weeks or until you are satisfied that they are disease free. There is nothing worse than having a disease go through the whole herd that could have been prevented. I also hold off on the vacinations and such if they need them for a bit, about a month to keep the stress to a minimum and then they get everything done at once(worming,etc.)Hope this helped a bit...<br>Janet
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bourtonsbovineemporium@attcanada.net
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Deb

Re: Feeder calves

Postby Deb » Fri Jun 11, 1999 8:08 am

Like Janet says try buying from someone direct not through<br>an auction barn. When I wean my calves I vaccinate, worm,<br>and bunk break them in a corral for at least 3 weeks<br>until they go to their new home. The majority of them<br>go to the same farmer every year. There have been 0<br>sick--he even sold his head chute to me because he<br>didn't need it. When they are delivered to his place<br>I walk them around the new corral...they are usually<br>eating in 15 minutes. Yes, he pays me top dollar,<br>but he knows it's worth it...he spent years of having<br>to medicate everything and losing animals. The local<br>vet thought he had gone out of business until he<br>found out that he was getting his calves from me.<br>So try to find someone in your area that preconditions<br>calves like me, pay them the few cents extra per<br>pound, and then you can worry less.
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sales@cornerfarm.com
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Janet

Re: Re: Feeder calves

Postby Janet » Fri Jun 11, 1999 1:13 pm

Well I just want to say Great Job Deb! I am always thankful to hear that there are responsible and reputable breeders out there. I also want to add that my reasons for prefering animals right off the farm of a good breeder are that auction animals have a way of being bought up by brokers and shipped to the next auction down the road where prices are higher. Makes for sick animals that in all likely hood have been through several auction before they get to the local auction. Again Thanks Deb and a job well done!<br>Janet
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bourtonsbovineemporium@attcanada.net
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