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Please I'd like some infomation....

Posted: Mon Mar 15, 1999 10:04 pm
by Kate Aldridge
I am a TAFE student who would like some infromation for a project.<br>I need to find the average weight, height and common disases, advantages & disadvantages <br>of Angus and Jersey cattle.<p>Your help would be must appreciated, please e-mail me on bangles07@hotmail.com<p>thanks.
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bangles07@hotmail.com

Re: Please I'd like some infomation....

Posted: Tue Mar 16, 1999 9:36 am
by Frankie
You can go to the Angus home page at http://www.angus.org and click on the Sire Summary, you'll find several graphs and charts relating to size of Angus cattle there. As for diseases, they tend not to have pinkeye, otherwise, they are as likely as any other breed to get sick. Angus cows are fertile, adequate milkers, and good mothers. Angus feeder calves are worth more because they tend to grade Choice at an earlier age and at a higher rate than other breeds. Angus heifers are quite popular, too. I know of a couple of heifer development programs that are based on Angus heifers. As for disadvantages, since I raise them, I'm not sure there are any. We probably need to increase muscle and decrease backfat in the breed. Some folks don't think they perform well in hotter climates, but I'm waiting to get more data from the new bull testing station in South Texas before I concede that. Sorry, I can't help with Jerseys.<p><p><br>
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frankie_133@hotmail.com

Re: Please I'd like some infomation....

Posted: Tue Mar 16, 1999 4:27 pm
by Jennifer
<br>: I am a TAFE student who would like some infromation for a project.<br>: I need to find the average weight, height and common disases, advantages & disadvantages <br>: of Angus and Jersey cattle.<p>: Your help would be must appreciated, please e-mail me on bangles07@hotmail.com<p>: thanks.<p>The American Angus Association's website at http://www.angus.org will have the information you need along with a link to CAB (certified angus beef) which can give you end product yeilds and benefits.<br>We, too, raise angus cattle. Another benefit to angus cattle is the access to the largest database of cattle records. These records help to ensure more predictable genetics for several characteristics.<br>The data for angus in 1997 (1998 yearling weights are being taken this year) are: Birth weight 82 (B), 77 (H), weaning weight 614 (B), 555 (H), Yearling weight 1092 (B), 804 (H), yearling height 50.4 (B), 48.3 (H), Scrotal cir 35.7 cm.<br>A mild winter caused a larger fly population last summer in the midwest. Even though angus, because of the dark eyelid pigmentation, are less prone to pinkeye problems, we still had some come down with this disease (even though we vaccinated). So, they are not completely free from this disease. From what I have read about pinkeye, the Jersey cattle are highly susceptible to pinkeye. "Even though eyelids in this breed are heavily pigmented, it is suspected that the prominence of their eyes may expose them to more intense ultraviolet light." <br>Other than this, I know little else about Jersey cattle. Perhaps they also have a website.<br>Good Luck.<br>Jennifer @ Double A Angus
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ameyers@mail.win.org

Re: Please I'd like some infomation....

Posted: Wed Mar 24, 1999 10:23 am
by Kathy Jordan
Some of the advantages of Angus cattle include fleshing ability, fertility, and marbling ability. They are also polled, which almost all breeders desire. Angus cattle are also solid black. Color has no influence on quality, but black cattle are popular now and are bringing more money.<br>The disadvantages include low yeilding, and moderate to low growth rate. In our herd, we have also noticed that Angus cross cattle have long hooves more often than other breeds. (This is caused by a structual problem.)<br>Angus are small framed and moderate milking cattle. These traits can be good or bad depending on the environment.<br>I don't know much about Jerseys, but they are dairy cattle that are known for high quality milk. They are the smallest of the well known dairy breeds. <p>
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terrydjordan@mindspring.com