prolapse

Cattle problems.
deb

prolapse

Postby deb » Sun Nov 28, 1999 11:09 pm

we have had three cows in the past 5 months that have prolapsed.<br>two are 3 yrs, second calf and one is 2 yrs, first calf. the 2 yr<br>old lost calf in June because of trauma after falling in a ditch at 12 weeks<br>and she prolapsed 1 month ago. The other two prolapsed right after calf birthing<br>have been treated by the vet and we plan to sell. We are trying to figure out<br>what seems to be causing so many prolapses in our cows. we are now leaning to <br>some type of nutrition deficiency. Any ideas?
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holemand@netscape.net
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Jennifer

Re: prolapse

Postby Jennifer » Mon Nov 29, 1999 10:20 am

(User Above) wrote:: we have had three cows in the past 5 months that have prolapsed.<br>: two are 3 yrs, second calf and one is 2 yrs, first calf. the 2 yr<br>: old lost calf in June because of trauma after falling in a ditch at 12 weeks<br>: and she prolapsed 1 month ago. The other two prolapsed right after calf birthing<br>: have been treated by the vet and we plan to sell. We are trying to figure out<br>: what seems to be causing so many prolapses in our cows. we are now leaning to <br>: some type of nutrition deficiency. Any ideas?<p>Sorry to hear of your problems. We have never had this happen to any of our cows (and hope it never will). You may want to look into calving problems. Were the calves all out of the same bull? Were the calves large or have large heads, feet, etc.? Did the cows not get up shortly after birth and continue to stain? (Also in many areas of the country, spring calves are usually larger than those born in the fall.)<p>We raise registered angus and use low birth weight EPD bulls on all our heifers and use moderate to low birth weight EPD bulls (small heads & not overly large shoulders)on our cows and so far have had only a few typical calving difficulties. (Our largest calf (bull) weighed 90 lbs.) One of our commercial customers is now running all angus bulls (the majority low birth weight EPD) and has greatly reduced his calving problems...<p>Calving ease bulls won't eliminate all calving problems, but they have seemed to minimize them. Most of the major breeds have birth weight EPD's to help identify calving ease sires (& dams).

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ameyers@mail.win.org
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Linda

Re: Re: prolapse

Postby Linda » Mon Nov 29, 1999 6:58 pm

Sorry to hear about your prolapse problems. In addition to the advice Janet gave, I'll only add that some breeds are more prone to prolapse than others, and the trait can be inherited.
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RafterL@murraygrey.com
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Janet

Re: prolapse

Postby Janet » Mon Nov 29, 1999 11:22 pm

If these were full uterine prolapses there really is no need to cull the cows. A uterine prolapse is NOT inheritable, a vaginal prolapse is though.Jennifer hit the nail right on the head with the bull though. Were these large calves? A prolonged labour will also increase the likelihood of uterine prolapse as well as a hard pull. We had a heifer prolapse this year. She has since go on to rebreed albeit a little late. My vets opinion as well as the university say go ahead and rebreed, it's no reason to cull. You need to watch cows after delivery, get them up and keep them up for at least 3 hours. If they continue to strain give them a shot of oxytocin.... and when all else fails pray...LOL! My advice is to look long and hard at your breeding program and go from there.... Good Luck!<br>Janet
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bourtonsbovineemporium@attcanada.net
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Pat

Re: prolapse

Postby Pat » Sun Dec 05, 1999 5:53 am

Vitamin B deficiency will cause retained placenta and other problems..don't know about prolapse. Are you using commercial/beef bulls on your cows? Selenium is another important mineral. Be sure you are using a good 12:12 mineral supplement and feeding breeder cubes (as opposed to just range cubes). We have gone to MLS tubs year round..they have one that is only minerals as well as the protein tubs which include all needed minerals, since the 12:12 blocks seem to turn to fossils before the cows eat them.<br>: we have had three cows in the past 5 months that have prolapsed.<br>: two are 3 yrs, second calf and one is 2 yrs, first calf. the 2 yr<br>: old lost calf in June because of trauma after falling in a ditch at 12 weeks<br>: and she prolapsed 1 month ago. The other two prolapsed right after calf birthing<br>: have been treated by the vet and we plan to sell. We are trying to figure out<br>: what seems to be causing so many prolapses in our cows. we are now leaning to <br>: some type of nutrition deficiency. Any ideas?<p>
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calpat@totalaccess.net
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Michelle

Re: Re: prolapse

Postby Michelle » Sat Dec 11, 1999 1:40 pm

(User Above) wrote:: In response to prolapsing females, a major problem may be the size of the calves verses the <br>ssize of the adult cow, if that does not eem to be the problem then overfat cowss maybe not mineral<br>deficiencies. If the cows consume large amounts of forage to the point of realy increasing the volume <br>in the rumen then this will displace other things including a calf from the abdominal region of the female.<br>Thiss is not common in bulls but can occure. We had two very large and bossy females that ssuffered from just<br>this problem and for the three weeks prior to calving they were limited to one flake of hay per day total<br>consuption and isolated from the herd, now this iss not pleasant for the cow however you will shrink down the size <br>of there digestive tract and reduce the gain of the calf inside thus killing two birds with one stone<br>1. reduce the pressure in the abdomen causing the prolaps<br>2. reduce the increased weight gain of the calf that occures in the third trimester of pregnancy<p>By doing this you may see a marked reduction in prolapses and find that the calf crop is slightly smaller than you <br>have previosly experienced, posibly with fewer distocias as well<p>Cows should also not be pushed nutritionaly when in the last trimester of pregnancy, you can do more damage than <br>good by over feeding. After all calves have hit the ground it is safe to go back to feeding heavily as this will help get the cows<br>back into shape faster and help them breed back quicker. You might also consult a vet or nutritionist local to your region who <br>can help you formulate a feeding and mineral program to fit your area and feeding habits.<br>Good Luck<br>

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kemilimo@tca.net
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