pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Cattle problems.
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Alice
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Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby Alice » Mon Mar 24, 2008 7:26 pm

bambi_boy wrote:Been putting one tablespoon of the powder per 2 pints of water... is that ok - or should I do just water?


I cannot see how a tablespoon in 2 pints of water could possibly hurt anything. And, should I lose my mind and decide to raise baby holstein bulls again, I intend to try it. :D

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Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby nap » Wed Jul 30, 2008 4:23 pm

What a wonderful post. It would be great for others with cattle problems to add pictures. They really are worth a thousand words. I am currently dealing with a case of foot rot that looks exactly like the picture. Anyone have a treatment suggestions? Thanks Milkmaid!
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Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby Double R Ranch » Mon Aug 04, 2008 12:30 am

Here are a couple pics of a heifer calf born the other day. The vet says it is just displaced tissue. Haven't decided if we will add her to the herd.

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Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby Double R Ranch » Mon Aug 04, 2008 12:38 am

This heifer was fine when we fed at night and severly dehydrated in the morning. After checking her stools we found she had scoured (vet says from the heat). She was put on scour meds and IV fluids. These pics were taken after several treatments. It looked a lot worse that morning.
Today this heifer is up and as of dinnertime tonight was bucking and playing. Thought you all who don't know what dehydration looks like might find this interesting.
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Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Mon Aug 04, 2008 11:24 am

Double R - your first heifer looks like a free-martin. Bull calf twin could have been obsorbed.
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Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby dun » Mon Aug 04, 2008 3:11 pm

Double R Ranch wrote:Here are a couple pics of a heifer calf born the other day. The vet says it is just displaced tissue. Haven't decided if we will add her to the herd.



Double R


Is the vet a large animal vet with cattle experience?
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Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby Double R Ranch » Mon Aug 04, 2008 5:42 pm

dun wrote:
Double R Ranch wrote:Here are a couple pics of a heifer calf born the other day. The vet says it is just displaced tissue. Haven't decided if we will add her to the herd.



Double R


Is the vet a large animal vet with cattle experience?


Yes he is a cattle vet with many many years of experience. Keep in mind that he hasn't seen her personally. He said there is no reason to pay a ranch call for him to look at this when he will be out in a few months for bangs vac.
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Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby randiliana » Fri Aug 15, 2008 11:40 am

This cow has pinkeye. Note the pinkish/white spot in the middle of the eye and the cloudy color to the rest of it. Although it is not tearing a lot.

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Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby Double R Ranch » Fri Aug 15, 2008 1:04 pm

Thanks, that will answer a lot of newbie's question. I have been waiting for a pinkeye case to show up to take a pic of it.
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Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby dun » Wed Aug 20, 2008 2:06 am

Left rear ankle and lower leg bones broken
foot2.JPG
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Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby luvaphahorses » Fri Aug 22, 2008 3:27 pm

thank you so much! i have a question about the one with the swelling under the throat from parasite over load, are there any other symptoms? thank you, so much.
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Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby IluvABbeef » Sat Aug 23, 2008 10:52 am

luvaphahorses wrote:thank you so much! i have a question about the one with the swelling under the throat from parasite over load, are there any other symptoms? thank you, so much.


Sounds more like the thyroid glands are swollen up from possibly lack of iodine. If it'd be parasite overload the animal'd be real thin with a bit of a pot belly, and a rough coat.

Great thread folks! I have a couple other pics I should add on here too, btw...
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Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby IluvABbeef » Sat Aug 23, 2008 11:53 am

Image
Image
Steer with abcess on front right shoulder

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Steer with internal parasites and mange (can't see much of the mange though :oops: )

Image
Steer in front ground had pneumonia, and one in the barn is the one pictured above.
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Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby Nesikep » Sun Dec 14, 2008 1:53 am

Another illness that we've had several times on our place is "Panter", or Atypical Pneumonia... this happens in the summertime around our place which gets rather warm, as we get over 40C (105F) coupled with 0% humidity

You'll notice a cow who can't or doesn't keep up with the herd, especially in the daytime, completely lacks vigor, as it gets worse she won't want to lay down because she doesn't want the effort of getting back up, as time goes on, she'll start coughing, won't eat anymore, and her situation gets compounded by the fact she usually doesn't have the energy to go to the watering trough... if caught early, put them on a good hay, try and keep them cool... we don't know of much else that can be done.. we've seen this in yearling heifers and older, never had trouble with a bull though... Onlly one cow for approx 12 that have had this have made a complete recovery, the others either die or end up with a lifetime cough, which means thier life is short since they won't breed and produce properly.... If you have a cow which gets this.. good luck, we've lost several of our best cows

What ends up happening is since they can't stop coughing their lungs get destroyed.

On a positive note, it could be that they can (you can) select cows which are resistant to it, as in the last 10 years we haven't had any more occurrences of it


Also, a note on scours... Especially if you're organic... vaccinations are always a good idea, but if you get a calf with scours, we found the pharmacy had a bottle of "activated charcoal" in a squeeze-bottle paste form which has worked for us... and you'll be able to tell which calf-pie you stepped in for about a month!



Next: when a cow "loses it's cud".. it's basically when the rumen of the cow stops functioning properly and turn into a hard lump in it's stomach rather than a bubbly soup... causes of this are varied (Lump jaw, wooden tongue, getting loose in a grain bin, anything that can affect it wanting to eat/chew cud regularly)... Basically what needs to happen is you have to get that lump of grass/hay softened back up, and you need to make them drink LOTS of water.. how?? LOTS of salt.. loose salt and then they'll drink

Next: Bloat.. I'm very surprised this hasn't been covered here!!
What happens with bloat is the rumen foams, which prevents the cow's natural burp reflex, and so the stomach fills with air, to the point where it can rupture it, Causes are usually from turning the cows out onto a lush (young clover, alfalfa, etc) pasture (or pastures fertilized with high nitrogen fertilizers), particularly if they've just come off hay, Also, legume pastures with frost are a danger. if you suspect a pasture could cause blot, let them in for an hour and take them out, let them get used to it slowly, let them roam around your yard for a while before letting them into the lush pasture

How do you diagnose it? standing from the back of the cow, you can see the left hand side of the cow's stomach area rise above the hips, the will LOOK LIKE BALLOONS

What to do? well, make them run, make them run like be nice! and get them out of whatever pasture they are, into one where there isn't anything to eat, In extreme cases, there is a device (A trocar (spelling??)) which is used to puncture the skin and stomach to release the air.. we've never had bloat, and thus never any need for this device, which we bought as a precaution... maybe someone else can expand on this


A note on Pinkeye.. a product (dominion labs?) called Pinkaway powder has worked wonders for us, again, it seems that once you get rid of this problem, you won't get it again unless you import a lot of animals into your herd. It comes in about a 3oz plastic squeezebottle, just snip the tip of it, and try and squirt it into their eye, seems to work best with about a 1/2 full bottle, and they won't like it too much, but it has worked to get rid of the infection, as well as clearing up the cloudyness of the eye

*edit*... OK, I did see this, with picture previously in this thread
Another calving problem that hasn't been noted here is Vaginal prolapse... a nasty situation, mostly caused by unexercised cows, large calves, and calving.. what happens is all the stuff that's supposed to be on the inside comes out, then swells like be nice, and won't go back in... unless you are ready to tackle this one, either call the vet or the butcher, the cow is basically a write off, as she's fairly unlikely to breed again.
one trick I heard of (and haven't needed to try yet) is to pour white sugar over the prolapse, which will draw a lot of the fluid which is swelling it, out, then, with the cow standing, much preferably in a squeeze, it can all gently (but it a lot of force) pushed all back in... keeping it in is another thing entirely, as the next time she lays down, it could all come out again.. I've seen the vulva actually sewn shut, first by some cotton string (I imagine a coarse catgut would work nicely), about 2-3 loops on each side of the vulva, then "shoelaced" together with bale twine... this procedure leaves 3 telltale scars on each side of the vulva.. so if you're buying an older cow.. it's something you can look for


Anyone interested in reading a book that's veterinarian related and hilarious, MUST read something by James Harriot (All creatures great and small is a good one).. a million laughs of an apprentice vet in rural england in the 1940's or so before modern medicine... you can learn a lot from those books


Hope my little writeup may help someone sometime
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Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby Double R Ranch » Sun Dec 14, 2008 2:05 pm

A note on Pinkeye.. a product (dominion labs?) called Pinkaway powder has worked wonders for us, again, it seems that once you get rid of this problem, you won't get it again unless you import a lot of animals into your herd. It comes in about a 3oz plastic squeezebottle, just snip the tip of it, and try and squirt it into their eye, seems to work best with about a 1/2 full bottle, and they won't like it too much, but it has worked to get rid of the infection, as well as clearing up the cloudyness of the eye


I am VERY interested in trying this product for pinkeye. Can you give us more information on it? Like where you get it, how you use it etc. We are always looking for a better and easier way on the cattle to treat pinkeye. I did a search and only found 1 thing on it and it was for dogs and cats.
Curently the only way we have found affective to completely clear the eye (we catch ours pretty soon after symptoms start) is to squirt pen G into there eye on a daily basis. We were looking for a way to treat it without upsetting the cow. We want calm cows who aren't affraid to go into the shoot. This (with no needle poking) works wonders. We can COMPLETELY clear up an eye, which as most of you know gets you better dollar when it time to sell.
Look forward to hearing more about this product.
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