pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Cattle problems.
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milkmaid
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pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby milkmaid » Sat Aug 25, 2007 4:48 pm

Thought since a picture is worth a thousand words, maybe we need a collection of pics for the newbies. :)

If anyone else has any good photos of pics that you want to share -- and you know what the problem is -- feel free to post. (Or, if you'll PM/email them to me, I'll put them in this post under a catagory.) Don't post pics that you don't know what's wrong; I don't want this turning into a "diagnose my cow" thread; this is simply for information purposes only.

If you want to use any of these pictures for information purposes, please PM me for permission first. I've had several of these pictures show up in various powerpoint presentations for classes I've taken in undergrad and graduate school - you know who you are!

Thanks!

First!!! -- Cow Parts
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Leg Problems

Hoof rot or foot rot - bacterial infection between the claws, causes swelling above the hoof that can extend to the hock
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Contracted tendons in a calf - can be genetic or simply caused by lack of room in utero; most cases straighten out on their own within a week or so.
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"Corn" between the claws of a bull's hoof - can be caused by high grain rations
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Udder Problems

Cow with only 3 working quarters (L/F is "dead") - caused by mastitis
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Edema (excess fluid/swelling along the underline) in a heifer prior to calving - common in heavy milkers, it'll go away on its own
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Another example in a heifer
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Ligament in the udder is ruptured - these kind will occasionally be passed off as nurse cows; don't buy one like this
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Another example
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Another poor udder; almost no milk production from the front quarters, she also has an extra teat on one of the back quarters
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Mastitis - infection within one of the quarters in the udder - needs to be treated or the cow needs to be culled; this is what mastitis looks like when the quarter is "stripped" or "milked out"
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Frostbitten teats - will often result in mastitis since the teat ends have been damaged, most common in fresh heifers
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Gangrene, likely as a result of clostridial or E. coli mastitis - prognosis is poor
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Calving problems

Backwards calf - DOA
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Retained placenta
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Hydrops -- caused by excessive amounts of fluid in the uterus -- in this case resulted in rupture of the prepubic tendon; note left flank
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Vaginal prolapse
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Another example - no, she's not calving
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Bull problems

"Broke" penis... the technical term is "penile hematoma"... caused by trauma.
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Another one - both of these bulls recovered with 60 days rest and passed a BSE.
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General bovine problems

Ringworm - it's a very contagious fungus that people, horses, dogs, cats, etc, can catch too
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Warts - often seen on the ears, neck, and face, but sometimes other locations on the animal as well. Usually introduced during tattoo/tagging (note warts in ear with bangs tag/tattoo).
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Warts in other locations:
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Knock knees - conformation flaw
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Abcess - superficial bacterial infection not in the bone
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another abcess
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Lumpy Jaw (actinomycosis) - bacterial infection in the bone - this is a really extreme case
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Early case of lumpy jaw:
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Cellulitis, inflammation of soft tissue
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Wry face - believe it's genetic, conformation flaw
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Cancer eye
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Bottle jaw - excess fluid or swelling under the jaw - can be caused by a heavy parasite infection
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BVD lesions in the mouth -- note they may or may not look like this; any oral lesions should be suspect
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IBR white plaque on the underside of the tongue -- note IBR usually causes blindness and that's a typical sign
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Blindness as a result of pinkeye
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Infected band on a bull-now-steer calf -- good reason to give tetanus toxoid when castrating calves. However, this isn't too abnormal to see as the dead tissue separates, and shouldn't affect the health of the calf.
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Hernia - can be genetic or caused by trauma - surgery fixed this one. Note the difference between this one and the braham calf below.
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Weanling calf with a hernia
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Mature cow with a hernia...
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Ventral edema/Brisket disease/High altitude disease/Hardware disease/Congestive heart failure (impossible to say from a picture)
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Another example:
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Mature cow with hematoma on her back - don't lance this! the only difference between a hematoma and an abscess is a needle/knife...
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Heifer with a stifle injury (eg ACL tear) -- please note this is an injury, not an infection, even though it looks like the calf below with a joint infection. Culture results revealed the difference.
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DA (displaced abomasum) surgery site - can't show you a pic of a DA itself, so the surgery site will have to do. Caused by a cow going off feed and the abomasum filling with gas and flipping to the other side of the rumen. Fresh cows are particularly suceptible. RDAs can be fatal within 12 hours, LDAs can persist for 2-3 weeks or more before the cow dies if surgery is not performed.
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Johnes - results in rapid weight loss and extreme emaciation even while the animal eats and acts normally. No cure and highly contagious to calves, symptoms usually don't appear until the animal is at least 2-3 years old.
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Specific calf problems

Joint ill - infection in a joint in calves; for this one it's the stifle joint
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Note there is a BIG difference between this calf and the stifle injury pictured up the page!!!

This calf's joint infection is in the knee
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Navel ill - this is much larger than you'll normally see - caused by not dipping the calf's navel in iodine after birth or being born in an unclean environment
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Crooked calf - possibly caused by the cow eating lupine while he was in utero. He physically cannot straighten his neck.
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Open umbilical hernia - these can be fixed if they're caught immediately (eg not allowed to get dirty) - this calf was euthanized immediately after the picture was taken.
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Dexter calf with fused teats - this is said to be genetic and the heifer would not be replacement heifer material
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Scours
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Dehydration -- the result of scours -- this calf is SEVERELY dehydrated. Generally dehydration isn't obvious until the animal has lost 6% of its body weight in water, and kidney damage occurs around 12% fluid loss.
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Oral lump possibly "calf diphtheria" - not confirmed.
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Calf with extra digits (front hooves)
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Other bovine stuff that isn't a problem

"Bleed-off" - occurs 2-3 days after a cow is in standing heat
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"Bangs" tag - shows the cow has been vaccinated for brucellosis; there should also be a tattoo in the right ear
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"Bangs" tattoo
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Vaccine lump - will disappear in time.
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Braham-influenced calf - normal amount of skin at navel area. Note the difference between this and the hernia pic above
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If anyone has pics of other problems, common or not-so-common, feel free to send them to me and I'll put them in this post.

Autopsy pictures are here: http://cattletoday.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=48528

Last updated: 1/29/2013
Last edited by milkmaid on Tue Dec 23, 2008 10:34 am, edited 10 times in total.
Basics needed to answer questions: age, weight, breed, sex. # affected vs # in group, feed type/amount, prior vaccinations, deworming, antibiotics, any recent changes....

More info = better answers.

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funky 4-Her
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Postby funky 4-Her » Sat Aug 25, 2007 5:01 pm

Edema (excess fluid/swelling along the underline) in a heifer prior to calving - common in heavy milkers, it'll go away on its own


Do you mean the swelling infront of the udder?
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KNERSIE
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Postby KNERSIE » Sat Aug 25, 2007 5:17 pm

good post, Milkmaid!

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Postby angie » Sat Aug 25, 2007 7:28 pm

Great post ~ Thanks!

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Postby milkmaid » Sat Aug 25, 2007 7:32 pm

funky 4-Her wrote:
Edema (excess fluid/swelling along the underline) in a heifer prior to calving - common in heavy milkers, it'll go away on its own


Do you mean the swelling infront of the udder?


Yep. Depending on the cow (it's more extreme in dairy breeds than beef breeds, of course) it can be just right in front of the udder, or extend even in front of the navel.
Basics needed to answer questions: age, weight, breed, sex. # affected vs # in group, feed type/amount, prior vaccinations, deworming, antibiotics, any recent changes....

More info = better answers.

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Lammie
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Postby Lammie » Sat Aug 25, 2007 8:26 pm

How nice of you to take the time and effort!
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Postby Gate Opener » Sat Aug 25, 2007 8:29 pm

What a great idea. I have a feeling these pictures will be used time and time again on these boards.

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Postby funky 4-Her » Sat Aug 25, 2007 8:30 pm

Yes it is a great post, just wasn't sure on that one pic. Thanks for clarifying
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Postby funky 4-Her » Sat Aug 25, 2007 8:55 pm

I think this post should be pinned (sp) to the top so all the newbies can see it...
Live for the moments that you can't put into words & never regret something that once made you smile!

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Postby bward » Sun Aug 26, 2007 8:56 am

So...................when will you be published? Are you going to be the new and improved Heather Smith Thomas? :)

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Postby Alan » Sun Aug 26, 2007 10:45 am

I'll add to the great post crowd! This is one of those great educational post! Thanks for taking the time.

Alan
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Postby toby » Sun Aug 26, 2007 1:05 pm

Milkmaid I would like to know how you got that picture of joint ill as the calf looks just like the calf I've been writing about in calf w/problems.
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milkmaid
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Postby milkmaid » Sun Aug 26, 2007 5:13 pm

toby wrote:Milkmaid I would like to know how you got that picture of joint ill as the calf looks just like the calf I've been writing about in calf w/problems.


Calf that was given to me. Ended up having to call it quits with her. Most of the pics are of my herd, some are from the dairy herd where I worked, some are from a relative's ranch.
Basics needed to answer questions: age, weight, breed, sex. # affected vs # in group, feed type/amount, prior vaccinations, deworming, antibiotics, any recent changes....

More info = better answers.

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Postby tryinhard » Mon Aug 27, 2007 8:38 am

Now, this is probably the most helpful thing I've seen on these boards. Dedication, time, effort, {no charge}. You should be most valuable {employee of the week/month} with no pay for what you are doing. I thank you for anyone who gets anything from this. Many questions will be answered from your effort with this post. Great work. Thanks.



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Postby Joy in Texas » Mon Aug 27, 2007 9:49 am

Great post Milkmaid. That is a wonderful thing to do. I know your many hours of time and trouble will help some of us.Thanks !


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