pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Cattle problems.
User avatar
Nesikep
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 11630
Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2008 10:37 pm
Location: Lillooet, BC, Canada

Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby Nesikep » Sun Dec 14, 2008 2:56 pm

I found this link on their site, not what we use, don't know if this works
http://www.domvet.com/horse-cattle/pet_ ... 4&id=18440

and after a bit of digging I found "pinkaway powder"
http://www.domvet.com/horse-cattle/pet_ ... 4&id=18444
we just squirt some of it (it's a dust) into their eye at feeding time.. they aren't too fond of the idea but it does work.. we haven't had any signs of pinkeye at our place for about 10-15 years now

A note on Warts too... our calves often get them when they're about 9 months old, and they clear up after a while.. we never have a mature cow with warts, the same goes for lice, the calves will get them, the older cows are clean
The only possible end result of treating all animals like people is that all people will be treated like animals

langlee
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 7:21 pm

Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby langlee » Thu Jan 08, 2009 7:44 pm

This has been so good for us on our small farm in Australia we thank you so much Bill and Wendy

randiliana
GURU
GURU
Posts: 4809
Joined: Wed Aug 24, 2005 6:26 pm
Location: Saskatchewan, Canada

Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby randiliana » Fri Mar 20, 2009 11:01 pm

Calf with an ear infection. This is an actual infection of the inner ear, not an infection caused by the ear tag, to the shell of the ear. Notice how the hair of the ear is clumped together, and it looks wet.

Image

Image
“The three great essentials to achieve anything worthwhile are, first, hard work; second, stick-to-itiveness; third, common sense.” Thomas A. Edisonl

Randi

My Blog
http://easygenes.blogspot.com/

QueenSidhe
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 13
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2009 8:49 pm
Location: Shelton, Washington
Contact:

Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby QueenSidhe » Mon Oct 05, 2009 3:26 am

A note on the list of cattle problems which included "Prolapse" also an important read for those whose cow is having a difficult birth.

We had this happen once. It happened to be our first calving. She was supposed to be a Black Angus. We were concerned as her pregnancy developed and thought she may be pregnant with twins which as large as she was. One day (luckily during the summer) she went into labor.

She'd wander around a small spot, which she had picked to give birth, would lay down, push, then get back up, push, circle around again, push. This went on for two hours. All that could be seen of the calf at this point was its front hooves and nose. We continued to keep an eye on the calf's nose color (for lack of oxygen/suffocation), and shortly after 2 hours we knew we were going to have to pull the calf. We knew two hours was the limit and when time really counted when a cow was in active labor (a time duration you need to keep in mind if you are breeding your cattle).

It took 3 of us adults to pull the calf. It took a good half hour for us to deliver it safely. We had to be careful and keep the cow in a position on the ground so we could safely pull the calf without damage to the cow or the calf. We also had to be careful to pull with the contractions- as we didn't want to do damage to her female organs or injure the calf. Finally, after a very sweaty and gruelling task of pulling this calf he wasn't breathing and his nose was a purplish-blue.

I proceded to give the calf CPR- the breathing part of it, and after several VERY tense minutes the calf finally started breathing and coughing out the last of the amniotic fluid.

After a few minutes of rest, due to the very hard labor the cow went through, we then forced her to get up and attempt to walk to get the rest of the afterbirth out.....only to have her prolaspe EVERYTHING. We were horrified! My husband's family had NEVER had something like this happen in all the years they raised cattle.

We called the livestock vet out, which he didn't make it out until 2 and half hours later. Even by the time the vet came, the cow was still have strong contractions....even with everything hanging out. By this time we had managed to slowly get her into one of the horse stalls which was all clean to try to keep the organs from getting too contaminated when she lay back down. The vet even told us she needed muscle relaxers to stop the contractions, otherwise getting "everything" back in would be a waste.

He gave her antibiotics, sterilized and pushed her organs back in, and sewed her up using cloth strips- from which her "organs" were trying to push their way back through. And...he NEVER gave her the muscle relaxers.

Major Problem # 1: We found out while we had her down for the vet that she was a Dexter, her horns had been burned off when she was VERY young (we had purchased her as a weanling) and so there was very little sign or scarring that would have been visible without thorough examination that she had ever even had horns. Dexters, by the way, are a smaller breed of cattle that are considered cross-purpose because they are used for both meat and milk. Due to their size you can have more of them on a smaller piece of land than the larger standard size bovine, and they eat less as well.

Major Problem # 2: The calf weighed just over 100 pounds when he was born. His mother weighed approx. 400 pounds. She was 3 years old.

Lessons Learned:
1. Don't wait 2 hours or more if you can see the cow in labor is having difficulty and the calf appears in distress. If within 1 hour 45 minutes of active labor there is no progress, take care of it then. We were lucky we were able to revive the calf (and he lived a full and sassy and SPOILED life).
2. If you have a prolapsed cow after giving birth, MAKE SURE the vet gives her muscle relaxers if you know she is still contracting (otherwise what ever the vet does is useless and just costs you more money).
3. Make sure you have a GOOD, RELIABLE vet that has a good reputation within the farming community.
4. Make sure you know FOR SURE the breed of cow/heifer you have so you know she will be large enough to handle giving birth to a calf that is consistant with the size of breed the bull is.
5. Make sure the vet is experienced in dealing with the type of situation you have and that he/she knows how to treat it properly.

Hope this helps someone before they end up going through what we did.
"If you are weird, you are normal. If you are normal, you are weird."

marti
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Jul 21, 2010 7:31 pm

Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby marti » Fri Sep 10, 2010 8:13 pm

These pictures are fantastic. Please, any experienced dairy person out there, fill in the blank ones. My cow who birthed for the first time three days ago has what looks like navel ills, or it might be edema (the picture didnt show on my computer) but at least it narrowed down things a bit. I thought she had internal bleeding or a hernia. Anyone tell me what I do if it is navel ills (or is it more likely to be a edema?) This cow is a jersey/holstein cross and is absolutely bursting with milk. We are still hand milking while the milking barn is built, but she has the smallest nipples (are they called this in English?) imaginable, though they seem to be growing each day, and is extremely difficult to milk though it is getting a bit easier each time. I am thinking of trying a human breast pump! Is this ridiculous or could it help? Any of you out there have any experience of milking by hand with any tips to help make it easier for first time cows?

User avatar
dun
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 46204
Joined: Sun Dec 28, 2003 10:34 am
Location: MO Ozarks

Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby dun » Fri Sep 10, 2010 9:31 pm

Probably edema, navel ill is more common in calves then cows. They are called teats. Since I haven;t hand milked a cow in years I can;t help with how better to do it. I just remember what a pain in the butt it was.
"“The more you know, the more you know you don't know.” ― Aristotle

terigro
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat May 21, 2011 9:44 pm

Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby terigro » Fri May 27, 2011 10:45 am

Thanks for the pics, good for learning.

User avatar
Nesikep
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 11630
Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2008 10:37 pm
Location: Lillooet, BC, Canada

Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby Nesikep » Fri May 27, 2011 5:57 pm

maybe try milking more often so the udder isn't so swollen... get some kids with small hands to milk her
The only possible end result of treating all animals like people is that all people will be treated like animals

User avatar
Kathie in Thorp
GURU
GURU
Posts: 4691
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2011 3:11 pm
Location: Pac NW (the Drier Part)

Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby Kathie in Thorp » Sat Aug 13, 2011 7:52 pm

These are great Milkmaid -- you've covered lots of territory with these pics and explanations! Thx.
I'm for shyts and giggles -- until I giggle and shyt!

User avatar
Kathie in Thorp
GURU
GURU
Posts: 4691
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2011 3:11 pm
Location: Pac NW (the Drier Part)

Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby Kathie in Thorp » Sat Aug 13, 2011 7:54 pm

Milkmaid -- Am wondering if this post, and previous about deliveries, etc., might also get posted on the Beginner board, since they are aimed at newbies ???
I'm for shyts and giggles -- until I giggle and shyt!

User avatar
Arkansas
Rancher
Rancher
Posts: 600
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 2:41 pm
Location: NE Arkansas

Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby Arkansas » Sat Dec 01, 2012 4:59 pm

Any chances of getting this updatd so the pictures show back up to them all ?
Last edited by Arkansas on Sat Dec 01, 2012 6:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Sorry about my grammar/punctuation, I'm from Arkansas! "Whats your excuse" :) 2B1ASK1

User avatar
milkmaid
GURU
GURU
Posts: 5290
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 12:34 pm
Location: Idaho

Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby milkmaid » Sat Dec 01, 2012 6:30 pm

Yep, I'll get it done........... will move it a little higher on my to-do list. Give me a week or two. Finals coming up and a couple research topics I'm working on at the moment. Thanks for the reminder, and feel free to PM and remind me again if the pictures aren't visible in about 2 weeks. Squeaky wheel gets the grease. ;-)
Basics needed to answer questions: age, weight, breed, sex. # affected vs # in group, feed type/amount, prior vaccinations, deworming, antibiotics, any recent changes....

More info = better answers.

User avatar
Arkansas
Rancher
Rancher
Posts: 600
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 2:41 pm
Location: NE Arkansas

Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby Arkansas » Sat Dec 01, 2012 6:58 pm

milkmaid wrote:Yep, I'll get it done........... will move it a little higher on my to-do list. Give me a week or two. Finals coming up and a couple research topics I'm working on at the moment. Thanks for the reminder, and feel free to PM and remind me again if the pictures aren't visible in about 2 weeks. Squeaky wheel gets the grease. ;-)


Good Luck! & Thanks
Sorry about my grammar/punctuation, I'm from Arkansas! "Whats your excuse" :) 2B1ASK1

suzorse
Trail Boss
Trail Boss
Posts: 323
Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2011 3:36 pm
Location: Emmett,Idaho

Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby suzorse » Sat Dec 01, 2012 9:55 pm

here is a pic of edema, cow is a first calf heifer , 3/4 Jersey 1/4 Holstien, it would go down during the day but be back every morning after she was laying down
Suzanne
Image
Image
long time member of Keeping a Family Cow
permitted raw milk dairy 006
Ginger the Jersey/Highlander/Angus/Hereford milk cow
Sweet Pea Jersey/Hereford milk cow
and the ever changing
bottle calves

User avatar
milkmaid
GURU
GURU
Posts: 5290
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2004 12:34 pm
Location: Idaho

Re: pics of cow problems and other stuff -- for the newbies

Postby milkmaid » Tue Jan 29, 2013 10:40 pm

The pictures have been updated. Thanks for the reminders folks, sorry about the delay.
Basics needed to answer questions: age, weight, breed, sex. # affected vs # in group, feed type/amount, prior vaccinations, deworming, antibiotics, any recent changes....

More info = better answers.


Return to “Health & Nutrition”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 10 guests