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Re: bottle calves for newbies

Posted: Tue Nov 30, 2010 4:05 am
by Suzie Q
It sounds like it is a bottle calf already.

The onlly way (I would use) to get it to suck on Mum's teats is to take it away from Mum for 12 hours and then put it on the teats you want.

This is very easy with our cattle crush (squeeze chute) I can put the cow in there and open the bottom half of the gate and get it under the cow with the calf, without getting kicked.

Re: bottle calves for newbies

Posted: Sat Dec 04, 2010 7:27 am
by 1_TXRancher
Hayray,
I am new to this forum....and I don't usually join these types of things, but I saw your question for help, and I hope this can help you and your calf.
Bottom line up front. If your calf is still alive and you are bottle/tubing it, you can probably still save it and get it's momma to take it back.
First, pen the momma and calf up together. The idea here is that they will have little to no contact with other cattle and will begin to bond. Second, ensure there is free choice hay and clean water. Next, inspect the calf closely for any possible injury or oral infection. If your calf was stepped on during birth, it could have sustained an injury to its mouth/tongue, thus preventing it from being able to latch on and nurse. If this is the case, I recommend that you take it to a vet for a further analysis and diagnosis.
If everything physically apears to be normal, continue with the following. Start with 1/2-1 quart of MR using a bottle. If the calf refuses to suck, or is too weak to suck, tube the calf. Follow up with a second feeding approx 6 hrs later with another 1/2 quart of MR. Then that evening feed another 1/2-1 quart of MR. This should allow the stress of the calf to subside a little. Plus it will sleep well with a full tummy. Then, the following morning, provide some range cubes or sweet feed for momma. While momma is enjoying her little treat, get the calf up and under momma. The calf should be good and hungry come morning. If the calf is still too weak, don't give up. Keep trying. I have used this before and seen a calf finally graft after three weeks. Just try to keep in mind, that real young calves nurse quite often. Therefore, if possible try to feed slightly small amounts, but broke up into three feedings rather than two. I hope this doesn't reach you too late. Good Luck!!
1_TXRancher

Re: bottle calves for newbies

Posted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 3:37 pm
by FarmerShell
should i get a orange cow!?

Re: bottle calves for newbies

Posted: Thu Dec 01, 2011 3:26 pm
by Ilovemycritters
Thank you for taking the time to put this useful information together. I just wish I had come across it before I bottle fed my first calf last year. Now I understand why he was "pot bellied". Thanks again!!

Re: bottle calves for newbies

Posted: Sat Dec 31, 2011 7:03 pm
by rnh1
what about putting them on a nurse cow? anyone done that? :cboy:

Re: bottle calves for newbies

Posted: Sun Jan 01, 2012 2:06 am
by regolith
yep. If you've got facilities to restrain the cow so you can put the calf on a teat without getting kicked it's easy. Do that every day till they do it on their own.
But then it wouldn't be a bottle calf.

Re: bottle calves for newbies

Posted: Fri Jan 13, 2012 7:28 am
by allenwalker
What kind of milk is safe for calves? That is if they are not with their mothers.

Re: bottle calves for newbies

Posted: Fri Feb 24, 2012 11:21 am
by concernedhand
Here's one, i got my first calf and when we weighed her, she was about 30lbs. We were told she was 2 weeks old..... im willing to bet she was 3 days old at most. She was thin and knuckled and still had the umbilical dried string thing hanging off of her.. We worked the knuckle out of her and she walks fine now, eats like a cow too. For the first 2 weeks i was giving her 2qts powder milk mix in the morning and 2qts @ night, keeping hay and grain avail 24hrs a day. When she was finally able to walk right, we started to let her out to pasture. I've seen her eating some hay and some grass out there. Ive also seen her drink some water too. I've had her 3 weeks now, and have taken her ration of milk to 2qts every evening, keeping the grain and hay avail at night when she's in the pen. (no mom, no donkey, dont want anything to snag her). We weighed her in just a day ago, and she's @ 80lbs. But to me, she still looks a bit thin, not pot bellied or anything, but just thin.

Did i cut her milk too soon? Should i make the grain avail during the day? (going to be hard, the other cows will eat that before she can make it to the trough) I want her to interact with the other cows as much as possible, but i want to make sure she gets what she needs to.

We've only had scours once, and that was when we first gave her the formula, she's been good since. Also, since this is my first, any idea what vaccinations i should give her? we are in florida and she's a beef calf. Any input would be hugely appreciated!

Re: bottle calves for newbies

Posted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 8:17 pm
by halfwaysharp
Thank you so very much for the education. I am on my 4th orphan and I lost one in error. Tubing was the cause. I feel guilty as heck. Thank you so much.

Re: bottle calves for newbies

Posted: Wed Apr 11, 2012 11:39 am
by gorillaboze
I have a 6 week old bottle calf. She was on the cow for two weeks but wasn't receiving adequate milk...both the calf and the cow were suffering. So we took her off and have been bottle feeding the past 4 weeks.

Yesterday morning she was fine, took her bottle, ate a little grain afterwards. Last night was another story. She was snotty nosed, breathing hard, and wasn't too interested in the bottle. We got her to take most of it, but we knew something was wrong. We took her temp and it was 106. Too late to call the vet, but called a local cattleman and he gave me some nuflor. Gave her 3cc last night and to give her 3cc tomorrow night. After the shot I had a packet of Sav-A-Caf Electrolytes Plus. I mixed this with water and she took it. This morning she seemed a little better, but I notices some scours and she only drank half a bottle.

Question: Should I try to giver her a bottle AND electrolytes, or just electrolytes until she is back to normal. Going to check her temp again tonight to make sure it is going down.

Thanks
-Chad

Re: bottle calves for newbies

Posted: Wed Apr 11, 2012 2:58 pm
by regolith
Could get mixed responses on that one...

Traditional way to handle scours was to replace all milk feeds with electrolyte for 48 hours, no longer.
Most people nowadays alternate electrolyte and milk feeding, at least four hours apart, to ensure the calf continues to receive enough energy and protein while fighting the illness.

I still use the former for all severe scours, and feed at eight hour intervals or less while they're dehydrated. Then start back on milk by giving only half quantity and increase slowly to the full amount, offering electrolyte between milk feeds until they're fully recovered.

Re: bottle calves for newbies

Posted: Thu Apr 12, 2012 1:17 pm
by gorillaboze
Ok, So I thought I made some progress but now not sure.

Day 1, temp was 106. Gave 3cc of Nuflor, and a combination of milk replacer/electrolytes. Day 2 temp was still 106 and it wasn't interested in eating anything. Gave Baytril and Banamine. Next morning (today) she took a full bottle of milk replacer, and 4 hours later a full bottle of electrolytes (just now). But, she seems to be a little stiff legged. She definitely has her appetite back, but that worries me. I did not take her temp again. Was going to wait until tonight so it will be 24 hours from last time I took temp.

Should I be worried? Should I be doing anything differently?

Re: bottle calves for newbies

Posted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 3:04 pm
by billydonaldsonsc
I have a 3 day-old Angus bottle calf that has 1 droopy ear. He eats well, has no runny nose or eyes. He seems to feel great, but he has 1 ear drooping. What do I need to do? Any ideas? Any advice would be great. Thanks!

Re: bottle calves for newbies

Posted: Thu Nov 01, 2012 6:55 pm
by chippie
It should straighten up with time. It may have been bent while he was inside the uterus.

Re: bottle calves for newbies

Posted: Fri Nov 02, 2012 7:54 am
by Crazy Farmgirl
Temp? head tilt? droopy eye? heat or pain response when ear is touched? Have seen many with Mycoplasma that started with ear droop and temp then head tilt follows within days, some also had droopy or runny eye on the same side as the droopy ear. I'd get a temp first.