Hay

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Re: Hay

Postby M-5 » Tue Mar 21, 2017 1:27 pm

I wish I could hook to the cutter today and laydown a few acres .
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Re: Hay

Postby Stocker Steve » Tue Mar 21, 2017 2:00 pm

RanchMan90 wrote:Why does everybody get into baling their own hay from an economic standpoint? What do you think?

A hobby for most. Financially, you might be better off letting the cattle trample any extra grass.

A few hay high volume on shares to avoid land investment and spread equipment cost.
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Re: Hay

Postby Son of Butch » Tue Mar 21, 2017 2:29 pm

RanchMan90 wrote:Why does everybody get into baling their own hay from an economic standpoint?
What do you think?

Because that's the way we have always done it. Already have the equipment, so no motivation to change.
Also sense of independence and dependability of not having to wait or be at the mercy of the whims of others.

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Re: Hay

Postby Txpiney » Wed Mar 22, 2017 6:27 am

8) Just as others have said, I got tired of having the hay done when "they" got time, not when I needed it done. I've got 6500 tied up in my having equipment, so you know it's state of the art equipment, right :cry2:

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Re: Hay

Postby FiveOaksFarmGA » Sat Mar 25, 2017 5:15 am

For me it was simple: I have more fields than I do cows. I put up what I need for the "winter" (not much in central GA), and I sell the rest. I also do hay for other farms in the area. It amounts to extra income, and I don't have to buy hay which puts more $ back in my pocket. I would rather have the hay under my control so I can produce GOOD hay and not buy crap hay that may or may not have been fertilized correctly or at all, may or may not have been sprayed for weeds, or may have been sprayed and harvested too early in the window.

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Re: Hay

Postby SRBeef » Sat Mar 25, 2017 8:07 pm

talltimber wrote:I don't have but about thirty head and I'm going to buy a used baler and either a second side delivery rake or a wheel rake for my own use. Already tired of waiting on a custom baler to finish his, then his primary big count customers before he can do mine. Hay for sale is either baled crp junk or priced as horse hay, for fescue


Making hay also helps in managing pastures. Grass growth never quite matches herd needs. Either too much or too little grass.

Bale it and put it in a hay shed or hire it inline wrapped when too much grass. Feed it in a sacrifice area when not enough grass rather than destroying pastures. I bought hay equipment after paying $225 for a round bale of ditch hay in the late spring of 2013 after the drought of 2012 and I ran out of fall purchased hay in the spring just at calving time. I was lucky to find any hay. Don't want to ever go through that again.

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Re: Hay

Postby TennesseeTuxedo » Sat Mar 25, 2017 8:21 pm

SRBeef wrote:
talltimber wrote:I don't have but about thirty head and I'm going to buy a used baler and either a second side delivery rake or a wheel rake for my own use. Already tired of waiting on a custom baler to finish his, then his primary big count customers before he can do mine. Hay for sale is either baled crp junk or priced as horse hay, for fescue


Making hay also helps in managing pastures. Grass growth never quite matches herd needs. Either too much or too little grass.

Bale it and put it in a hay shed or hire it inline wrapped when too much grass. Feed it in a sacrifice area when not enough grass rather than destroying pastures. I bought hay equipment after paying $225 for a round bale of ditch hay in the late spring of 2013 after the drought of 2012 and I ran out of fall purchased hay in the spring just at calving time. I was lucky to find any hay. Don't want to ever go through that again.


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Re: Hay

Postby Brute 23 » Sat Mar 25, 2017 9:55 pm

I despise hay and every thing that goes with it. It's one of the most risky parts of the whole business and most expensive. We are trying to add most of our hay fields to the grazing rotation and get by with the absolute minimum amount of hay. I'd rather buy feed and lock that cost in than roll the dice on hay every year.
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Re: Hay

Postby Stocker Steve » Sun Mar 26, 2017 5:55 am

RanchMan90 wrote:I have a hard time pencilling that out not counting the lost grazing. Other than perhaps not getting gouged on hay prices in a drought year. What do you think?


True unless you love wrenching.
An issue that concerns many.
I think you need to start from a profit per acre goal, rather than focusing on potential problems. Profit per acre will move you towards higher stocking capacity with a mix that includes yearlings.
Owning a round baler will not prevent a drought. So you need a drought plan, but not a drought focus. Plans may include destocking early starting with yearlings, having improved pasture containing drought resistant plantings, having cheap hay under tarp, having embryos in the tank, going on vacation...
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Re: Hay

Postby sackshowcattle » Sun Mar 26, 2017 8:52 am

I think location and how much work you want to put into it determines if there is value in it. I put up small squares of alfalfa. Cows get top and bottom bales from the stacks and the balance in first cutting. Its a pivot so we get 3 or 4 cuttings a year. If you live down south were this is minimal winter feeding it wouldn't be much value. If your rolling round bales those are still cheap here currently. If you live here in the West with all the cattle coming out of the mountains in the winter and feed for 6 months there is value in it. I adveraged around 4 bucks a bale on small squares this year with about 1500 more bales to sale this year of the 6000 I had to sale after my supply for the cattle was filled. So to me it is very profitable the sale hay paid all the cost turned a profit plus supplied my cattle with all winter feed. One of my uncle's use to say if your going to be in the hay business you have to have cows cause you will have good hay that picky horse people will refuse to feed.

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Re: Hay

Postby TexasBred » Sun Mar 26, 2017 7:59 pm

sackshowcattle wrote:I think location and how much work you want to put into it determines if there is value in it. I put up small squares of alfalfa. Cows get top and bottom bales from the stacks and the balance in first cutting. Its a pivot so we get 3 or 4 cuttings a year. If you live down south were this is minimal winter feeding it wouldn't be much value. If your rolling round bales those are still cheap here currently. If you live here in the West with all the cattle coming out of the mountains in the winter and feed for 6 months there is value in it. I adveraged around 4 bucks a bale on small squares this year with about 1500 more bales to sale this year of the 6000 I had to sale after my supply for the cattle was filled. So to me it is very profitable the sale hay paid all the cost turned a profit plus supplied my cattle with all winter feed. One of my uncle's use to say if your going to be in the hay business you have to have cows cause you will have good hay that picky horse people will refuse to feed.


There is some truth in that statement but if you're going to "tell me" it's good hay you better be able to show me it's good hay as with a good hay test that will prove that just because it looks like shyt it's really good hay. ;-) I never buy hay without a test. I pull the sample, I pay for the test, but allow you to mail the sample and have results returned directly to you.
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Re: Hay

Postby Dave » Mon Mar 27, 2017 9:39 am

I sold my hay equipment in 1998. Since then I have bought better hay then I could make for less money every year but one. I like not spending my summer doing hay. Instead I can do something important like go fishing.

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Re: Hay

Postby skyhightree1 » Mon Mar 27, 2017 10:02 am

RanchMan90 wrote:Why does everybody get into baling their own hay from an economic standpoint? A lot of operations I know have over $100k tied up in hay equipment for 100 cows and may custom bale some. I have a hard time pencilling that out not counting the lost grazing. Other than perhaps not getting gouged on hay prices in a drought year. What do you think?


All of my hay equipment is old and is slow… I do like cutting my own hay when stuff isn’t breaking that is.. Some farmers just simply enjoy cutting hay as much as they enjoy their cattle. I didn’t cut for a year and missed it and got a chance to cut last year but my hay is cut on 50/50 someone else does most of the haying I help some. I must say I really like not having to cut hay sometimes and other times I miss it. Realistically I didn’t want to invest in all new or like new haying equipment so I made a deal with someone.
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Re: Hay

Postby Stocker Steve » Mon Mar 27, 2017 10:05 am

Dave wrote:I sold my hay equipment in 1998. Since then I have bought better hay then I could make for less money every year but one. I like not spending my summer doing hay. Instead I can do something important like go fishing.


Sounds good. I hope your suppliers deliver.

Had a neighbor who worked in town, ran cows, and bought all his hay. Ended up selling the cows because he spent fall weekends hauling hay rather than bow hunting. :nod:
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Re: Hay

Postby FiveOaksFarmGA » Tue Apr 04, 2017 9:44 pm

TexasBred wrote:
sackshowcattle wrote:I think location and how much work you want to put into it determines if there is value in it. I put up small squares of alfalfa. Cows get top and bottom bales from the stacks and the balance in first cutting. Its a pivot so we get 3 or 4 cuttings a year. If you live down south were this is minimal winter feeding it wouldn't be much value. If your rolling round bales those are still cheap here currently. If you live here in the West with all the cattle coming out of the mountains in the winter and feed for 6 months there is value in it. I adveraged around 4 bucks a bale on small squares this year with about 1500 more bales to sale this year of the 6000 I had to sale after my supply for the cattle was filled. So to me it is very profitable the sale hay paid all the cost turned a profit plus supplied my cattle with all winter feed. One of my uncle's use to say if your going to be in the hay business you have to have cows cause you will have good hay that picky horse people will refuse to feed.


There is some truth in that statement but if you're going to "tell me" it's good hay you better be able to show me it's good hay as with a good hay test that will prove that just because it looks like shyt it's really good hay. ;-) I never buy hay without a test. I pull the sample, I pay for the test, but allow you to mail the sample and have results returned directly to you.


How you "pull" that sample can alter the outcome of the test. Selling hay to some people is a pain. There are more buyers than sellers. You wouldn't pull one of mine. I'd show you the test (taken with a hay core sampler the proper way), your decision after that. Would you let someone come on your farm and do that? I think not. Seems rather insulting to me, after I've spent the time and money to prove the quality, after spending the time and money to get the quality.
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