Page 3 of 3

Re: Rotational grazing ?

Posted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 3:28 pm
by ClinchValley
FarmerJan - How does the rye and wheat do? I suppose i'm asking if it is worth the work.

Since we started rotating pastures, clover has made a huge comeback. Where i winter the cattle, red, white, and yellow clovers make up probably 70% of the stand after spraying. Even after overseeding w K31 in february. After the drought too, which killed all the clover we had just about. Hay and pasture both are mostly fescue w OG and timothy making up 15-20% on hay ground. Pasture is fescue and natives and clovers w some johnson grass, which I really like. Lots of Dallisgrass coming on now.

I'm forever a fan of rotating. Plan to split pasture more and more for the next couple years. Have to get past the water thing though. Need to be digging some ponds. They filled in 6 or 7 when the well was dug and installed. I would love to have them back. What do y'all do for water when rotating?

Re: Rotational grazing ?

Posted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 5:48 pm
by angus9259
Dave wrote:There is a wide array of grass out there, so your grass may act different from my grass. The objective of grass is to form a mature seed head. Once it has done that it a done growing for the year. So my objective is to keep it from forming that seed head. That way it will keep coming back. I don't like to clip as that cost time and money. So I try to confine the cows down enough to where they eat most everything. It doesn't always work but I try. A few scattered seed heads I don't worry about because it isn't worth the time and diesel to cut them.


This is exactly what I do. I make em eat most everything to the point where I don't need to brush hog but once a year for weeds. I reckon that makes the root system a little weak but I hate seeing the waste of trampled grass. Also, that way they eat everything - not just their favorite spots.

Re: Rotational grazing ?

Posted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 9:01 pm
by Jeanne - Simme Valley
Rotational grazing can be as simple or complex as you want to make it. There is intensive where you move them daily all the way to maybe weekly. I like to give them an area for 3-5 days, but that varies as to whether it is early spring or dry summer. First grazing usually is the whole field for 1 day. By day 10, I am starting over and they may take 2-3 days, then I start splitting paddocks. I have 1 real water source and everything is alleywayed to it. The furthest field is about 1/2 mile away. It has never been a problem.