Working cattle - how not to get kicked

The place to start if you are new!
User avatar
HDRider
GURU
GURU
Posts: 4131
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 9:25 am
Location: NE Arkansas

Re: Working cattle - how not to get kicked

Postby HDRider » Thu Sep 14, 2017 4:47 pm

ALACOWMAN wrote:
HDRider wrote:OK, you hardcore types maybe this is something 2nd nature to you. It is a good question, and I would like to hear advice on it.

I been at cows now almost a year and kicked twice now, and I didn't like it too much.

Blood clots happen often with a kick...

So, it just keeps getting better...
0 x
bball wrote: "The juice wasn't worth the squeeze."
Dun said, "You gotta be flexible. Do whatever you have to do for the best results within your limitations."

User avatar
HDRider
GURU
GURU
Posts: 4131
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 9:25 am
Location: NE Arkansas

Re: Working cattle - how not to get kicked

Postby HDRider » Thu Sep 14, 2017 4:48 pm

I was thinking that too...
0 x
bball wrote: "The juice wasn't worth the squeeze."
Dun said, "You gotta be flexible. Do whatever you have to do for the best results within your limitations."

User avatar
Jeanne - Simme Valley
GURU
GURU
Posts: 7438
Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 6:46 am
Location: Central Upstate New York
Contact:

Re: Working cattle - how not to get kicked

Postby Jeanne - Simme Valley » Thu Sep 14, 2017 4:51 pm

Also, some breeds tend to be "lighter footed" than others. I am NOT trying to pick on breeds, but, the smaller breeds tend to be a little nastier. This is true in most species - Chiwawa (sp? vs St Bernard -- Shetland Pony vs Draft Horse.
Angus is not considered one of the "smaller breeds", but I sure would add them to the list of being "light footed".
I won't say I have never been kicked. But, I don't think I have ever been kicked standing behind one in the chute.
Tailing a cow works great. We use that method when my nephew is castrating with a scalpel (older calves). You hold the tail up with one hand and you apply pressure low on the underside of the tail, putting pressure towards the front on the animal. I stand in the chute to the side of calf's hips, & nephew squats directly behind him.
The method of putting a rope around their flank works real well, we use this method if we need to assist a calf nursing. I do it different? We put the rope in the front of the udder & make sure it is in front of their hip bones - cinch up tight!! Be sure to use a quick release, because if too tight, she can go down.
1 x
Simme Valley of New York - http://www.SimmeValley.com
"We make a living by what we get,
we make a life by what we give."

ALACOWMAN
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 13497
Joined: Fri Jul 08, 2005 4:16 pm
Location: heart of dixie

Re: Working cattle - how not to get kicked

Postby ALACOWMAN » Thu Sep 14, 2017 4:59 pm

Been awhile since I've had to do it ,,,it might have been in front of the udder..
0 x
Santa Claus, the ultimate Yankee....

User avatar
dun
Mentor
Mentor
Posts: 46738
Joined: Sun Dec 28, 2003 10:34 am
Location: MO Ozarks

Re: Working cattle - how not to get kicked

Postby dun » Thu Sep 14, 2017 5:22 pm

ALACOWMAN wrote:Been awhile since I've had to do it ,,,it might have been in front of the udder..

Yup, it's in front of the udder. The reson it works is mostly from the pressure on the spine of the rope being really tight.
1 x
"“The more you know, the more you know you don't know.” ― Aristotle

User avatar
slick4591
GURU
GURU
Posts: 8245
Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 6:58 pm
Location: Farmersville, Texas
Contact:

Re: Working cattle - how not to get kicked

Postby slick4591 » Thu Sep 14, 2017 5:40 pm

Maybe find a used one of these.

Image
0 x
"If the mountain were smooth you couldn't climb it." ~ unknown

VirginiaCattle
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 40
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 6:15 pm
Location: Southwestern Virginia

Re: Working cattle - how not to get kicked

Postby VirginiaCattle » Thu Sep 14, 2017 5:57 pm

A cow in a chute won't kick straight back. They swing their feet to the side as they kick and the sides of the chute prevent that. If they get to bucking they could kick you but you should have time to back up. Having their tail pushed up in the air gives you a lot of control over their movements. Just push the tail up and forward if they act up. Watch out about putting a bar behind them then getting in there woth them. If they do buck they can hurt you more with the bar than with their foot alone.
0 x

User avatar
TCRanch
GURU
GURU
Posts: 2148
Joined: Wed Jun 10, 2015 9:21 am
Location: Winfield, KS

Re: Working cattle - how not to get kicked

Postby TCRanch » Thu Sep 14, 2017 6:07 pm

They can absolutely kick from behind - sporting a shiny new bruise to prove it. Last summer we had a hard pull, cow was down with a pinched nerve. I was standing in the bucket of the track loader trying to get the lift secured and she swung her head around with a direct hit to my a$$ and sent me flying. In the chute, tailing does work & sometimes a heavy pipe strategically placed between the legs/bars.
0 x

User avatar
Supa Dexta
GURU
GURU
Posts: 1735
Joined: Mon Dec 22, 2014 6:33 am
Location: Eastern Canada

Re: Working cattle - how not to get kicked

Postby Supa Dexta » Thu Sep 14, 2017 6:57 pm

Its better to be within a few inches, than a foot or 2 out. Being close ends up being more of a push then a kick with snap to it. Don't square up to them leaving your willy as a target, keep the outside of your leg facing them more. I'm usually out of range, or right on top of them when I'm working them into tight quarters.

When I work groups of feeders I have a set of knee/shin pads I wear at times too. They seem to kick more than anything.

Use a cane so you don't have to get within kicking distance when moving them along.

I'd say getting a calf to suck is the most danger I'm in for kicks, as its more likely my face is down close to a hoof, more so than when I'm standing up working cattle. I'll tie leg's if they really wanna get kicky.
3 x

User avatar
Workinonit Farm
GURU
GURU
Posts: 6461
Joined: Thu Nov 04, 2004 5:34 pm
Location: Ctrl Virginia

Re: Working cattle - how not to get kicked

Postby Workinonit Farm » Thu Sep 14, 2017 7:40 pm

I've been kicked at and kicked a few times. Calves have been the worst. A few times one has nailed my with both hind feet, on my thighs or shins.

With cows, if I need to be IN the chute with them, I have 3 pipes I put in, cross-wise, at different heights. Works very well. When vaccinating, de-worming, replacing ear tags etc, they have their heads in the catch , and I'm standing off to the side.

When playing rodeo while trying to get a cow to accept a calf, the rope "trick" works well, especially if you're by yourself. If you happen to be fortunate to have a helper, tailing them works well too.

An aside, a Llama, if taking a notion to, will kick the shyt out of you! But, I will say, its not as bad as a horse or a cow, as the bottoms of their feet are soft.
0 x
Live each day as if it were your last.

User avatar
kenny thomas
GURU
GURU
Posts: 7024
Joined: Sun Nov 16, 2008 7:16 pm
Location: SW tip of Virginia

Re: Working cattle - how not to get kicked

Postby kenny thomas » Thu Sep 14, 2017 8:15 pm

[quote="Supa Dexta"]Its better to be within a few inches, than a foot or 2 out. Being close ends up being more of a push then a kick with snap to it. Don't square up to them leaving your willy as a target, keep the outside of your leg facing them more. I'm usually out of range, or right on top of them when I'm working them into tight quarters.[quote]

Very good advice, all they can do is push you away.
After being kicked a lot I bought an Immobilizer. Hook it up and they just stand there if I am castration, workIng on a foot, working on an eye. Best money I ever spent except for the head chute.
0 x
My thoughts only, don't bet the farm on them. KT

Some people know people, who know people, who aren't very nice people and you could get a visit from them someday. So be good people.

User avatar
kenny thomas
GURU
GURU
Posts: 7024
Joined: Sun Nov 16, 2008 7:16 pm
Location: SW tip of Virginia

Re: Working cattle - how not to get kicked

Postby kenny thomas » Thu Sep 14, 2017 8:21 pm

HDRider wrote:
ALACOWMAN wrote:
HDRider wrote:OK, you hardcore types maybe this is something 2nd nature to you. It is a good question, and I would like to hear advice on it.

I been at cows now almost a year and kicked twice now, and I didn't like it too much.

Blood clots happen often with a kick...

So, it just keeps getting better...

Knee surgery sometimes follows also,
1 x
My thoughts only, don't bet the farm on them. KT

Some people know people, who know people, who aren't very nice people and you could get a visit from them someday. So be good people.

wbvs58
GURU
GURU
Posts: 3085
Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2011 12:45 am
Location: S.E. Queensland, Australia

Re: Working cattle - how not to get kicked

Postby wbvs58 » Thu Sep 14, 2017 9:18 pm

Our crushes all have a half gate that swings across behind the cow when her head is caught, called a kick gate and gives good protection when working behind.

Ken
1 x

talltimber
GURU
GURU
Posts: 1203
Joined: Wed Apr 16, 2014 6:29 pm
Location: Southeast Missouri

Re: Working cattle - how not to get kicked

Postby talltimber » Thu Sep 14, 2017 9:47 pm

It's not intuitive, but when behind calves at least, get right up their azz. When you think you're too close get about three feet closer, I mean right behind them, touching them. That takes a lot of power off that kick, they won't be close to extension. When cutting, have both arms right against and pressure applied to the bottom of the hams just above the hocks. You can feel every move they make and can get the knife pulled back before the kick. You are welcome.
1 x
If you cross the river before, leave a good horse on this side.

Cucumber35
Cowhand
Cowhand
Posts: 125
Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2016 9:02 pm
Location: Mason Dixon Line

Re: Working cattle - how not to get kicked

Postby Cucumber35 » Thu Sep 14, 2017 9:50 pm

Tailing works great if you have help. If you're helper isn't worried they are going to break the tail then they aren't holding it up hard enough. I also agree with staying close. If you aren't up against them to where they know you are there then you're better off making sure you are out of range completely, which is farther than one might think. I find if you stay close you'll get more of a warning and just a push. If you're far enough away to let them wind it up and get momentum, then more often than not you probably can't move fast enough to avoid getting nailed. I always try to stand sideways to them also. I'd rather get kicked in the side of my legs than the front or worse yet in between them...
1 x


Return to “Beginners Board”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests