Stockpiling

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boondocks
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Stockpiling

Postby boondocks » Mon Sep 25, 2017 11:34 pm

Newbie question. I keep hearing this term but seems used differently in different contexts. What does it mean, technically?
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby dun » Tue Sep 26, 2017 12:17 am

It means to allow grass to grow and not graze it till a later time. Works best with cool season grasses that will have a growth period in the fall. Then it will be grazed during late fall or into winter.
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby boondocks » Tue Sep 26, 2017 12:30 am

dun wrote:It means to allow grass to grow and not graze it till a later time. Works best with cool season grasses that will have a growth period in the fall. Then it will be grazed during late fall or into winter.


Thanks, I knew it had a connotation of "saving it for later" but didn't know if it was cut or left to grow, and if cut, "piled" in some form or fashion! :lol:
We essentially do that, I guess. We have some fields we usually only get one cutting of hay from. We then let them grow into the fall then polywire them off until it starts to head into snow, or gets so wet that we don't want to ruin the field for hay. In the fall, we have problems with deer breaking thru the poly. Keep trying to get a nuisance permit (or better hunters!). Have a "resident herd" of about 25-30 deer. Or giant lawn rats as a friend calls them.
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby wbvs58 » Tue Sep 26, 2017 3:41 am

boondocks wrote:
dun wrote:It means to allow grass to grow and not graze it till a later time. Works best with cool season grasses that will have a growth period in the fall. Then it will be grazed during late fall or into winter.


Thanks, I knew it had a connotation of "saving it for later" but didn't know if it was cut or left to grow, and if cut, "piled" in some form or fashion! :lol:
We essentially do that, I guess. We have some fields we usually only get one cutting of hay from. We then let them grow into the fall then polywire them off until it starts to head into snow, or gets so wet that we don't want to ruin the field for hay. In the fall, we have problems with deer breaking thru the poly. Keep trying to get a nuisance permit (or better hunters!). Have a "resident herd" of about 25-30 deer. Or giant lawn rats as a friend calls them.


We have the same problem except with kangaroos, they are just big rats.

Ken
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby boondocks » Tue Sep 26, 2017 11:12 pm

wbvs58 wrote:[
We have the same problem except with kangaroos, they are just big rats.

Ken


Maybe we should trade! At least it would be amusing!
Do the kangaroos break fences? Maybe they're better jumpers? ;-)
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby dun » Wed Sep 27, 2017 12:13 am

One other thing is that MIG dovetails perfectly with stockpiling. The better you care for your grasses the better the stockpiling results will be. Around her most people are feeding hay by late october or early november. They old just pracfice open grazing. We do MIG ( not as intensive as we used to because I can;t do the work as much as I used to to) but we typically unless we get deep snow or ice don;t start feedig hay until late february or eraly march. Some years if the year before was good enough we don;t feed until april or may. As CB has pounded on so much (paraphrased) take care of your grass and your grass will take care of you.
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby Stocker Steve » Wed Sep 27, 2017 1:32 am

dun wrote:We do MIG ( not as intensive as we used to because I can;t do the work as much as I used to to) but we typically unless we get deep snow or ice don;t start feedig hay until late february or eraly march. Some years if the year before was good enough we don;t feed until april or may.


Stockpiling is good but it is not free. Obviously you have to reduce your stocking rate to grow the stockpile, and perhaps also make a fall N application. How do you financially balance these choices?
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby wbvs58 » Wed Sep 27, 2017 3:26 am

boondocks wrote:
wbvs58 wrote:[
We have the same problem except with kangaroos, they are just big rats.

Ken


Maybe we should trade! At least it would be amusing!
Do the kangaroos break fences? Maybe they're better jumpers? ;-)


They mostly go under or through, the big ones go over. I would like to fence them out but my boundary is too rough and rocky and impossible to seal up all the gaps. A lot of exclusion fencing going on out west mainly for dogs to protect the sheep and it is also very successfull keeping the roos out, making a big difference.

Ken
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby dun » Wed Sep 27, 2017 5:14 am

Stocker Steve wrote:
dun wrote:We do MIG ( not as intensive as we used to because I can;t do the work as much as I used to to) but we typically unless we get deep snow or ice don;t start feedig hay until late february or eraly march. Some years if the year before was good enough we don;t feed until april or may.


Stockpiling is good but it is not free. Obviously you have to reduce your stocking rate to grow the stockpile, and perhaps also make a fall N application. How do you financially balance these choices?

You don;t really have to reduce your stocking rate. With proper management it isn;t required. It just takes more management to make it work.
If I notice dark green pee spots in the pasture I will take a soil sample. We haven;t had to add N for several years.
That all being said, a lot depends on your soil and the grasses you are growing.
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby chevytaHOE5674 » Thu Sep 28, 2017 9:32 am

I try to "stockpile" enough 2nd crop (either hay or grazing the first) to make it until the first of December. I could increase my stocking rates a tad and have the "stockpile" grazed off and be feeding hay sooner but feeding hay December thru May is long enough.

Should mention that stock piling UP north can be a risk as well. 2014 I had enough grass to get through December no problem, but November 13th came along and dropped like 40" of heavy snow on us that stuck around making grazing impossible. So all that nice grass I had was left to rot down over the winter.
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby Workinonit Farm » Thu Sep 28, 2017 10:35 am

boondocks, have you all had a chance to get any of your "new" hay equipment running yet? Tried any of it out?
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby boondocks » Thu Sep 28, 2017 1:32 pm

quote="Workinonit Farm"]boondocks, have you all had a chance to get any of your "new" hay equipment running yet? Tried any of it out?[/quote]

We are working on getting everything greased up and checked out. And reading manuals :lol:
Still looking for a used tedder. So far we find ones that are essentially scrap metal, or are nicer but about the cost of new, or are far too big.
We still have hay that's never been cut. We've finally gotten a long spell of dry weather but "our" hay guy just used the window to cut his own second cutting while our "first" (or whatever you'd now call the mess) is still in the field. :cry2: It may just have to be brush hogged. Looks like a lot of goldenrod. We just had that field reseeded last year so am not happy. If he'd just bailed on us (no pun intended) upfront, it would have been better...Kept believing him because everyone says he's a "good guy" and will stand by his word.
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby True Grit Farms » Thu Sep 28, 2017 1:47 pm

boondocks wrote:quote="Workinonit Farm"]boondocks, have you all had a chance to get any of your "new" hay equipment running yet? Tried any of it out?


We are working on getting everything greased up and checked out. And reading manuals :lol:
Still looking for a used tedder. So far we find ones that are essentially scrap metal, or are nicer but about the cost of new, or are far too big.
We still have hay that's never been cut. We've finally gotten a long spell of dry weather but "our" hay guy just used the window to cut his own second cutting while our "first" (or whatever you'd now call the mess) is still in the field. :cry2: It may just have to be brush hogged. Looks like a lot of goldenrod. We just had that field reseeded last year so am not happy. If he'd just bailed on us (no pun intended) upfront, it would have been better...Kept believing him because everyone says he's a "good guy" and will stand by his word.[/quote]

Supposedly it was 90 on Grindstone Island last Sunday. Everyone was swimming and water skiing, it was to cold for that when I was there.
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby M.Magis » Thu Sep 28, 2017 1:49 pm

boondocks wrote:
We are working on getting everything greased up and checked out. And reading manuals :lol:
Still looking for a used tedder. So far we find ones that are essentially scrap metal, or are nicer but about the cost of new, or are far too big.
We still have hay that's never been cut. We've finally gotten a long spell of dry weather but "our" hay guy just used the window to cut his own second cutting while our "first" (or whatever you'd now call the mess) is still in the field. :cry2: It may just have to be brush hogged. Looks like a lot of goldenrod. We just had that field reseeded last year so am not happy. If he'd just bailed on us (no pun intended) upfront, it would have been better...Kept believing him because everyone says he's a "good guy" and will stand by his word.

This is why I bought my own equipment. I know that in parts of the country, hiring someone to put up hay or buy hay from is easy. That's just not the case here. These days it's nice getting into fall having gotten 2 or 3 cuttings done on all my fields. I know I can buy good hay THIS year, but it's not always available. And as long as not much breaks, I enjoy putting up hay.
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby Workinonit Farm » Thu Sep 28, 2017 2:24 pm

boondocks wrote:quote="Workinonit Farm"]boondocks, have you all had a chance to get any of your "new" hay equipment running yet? Tried any of it out?


We are working on getting everything greased up and checked out. And reading manuals :lol:
Still looking for a used tedder. So far we find ones that are essentially scrap metal, or are nicer but about the cost of new, or are far too big.
We still have hay that's never been cut. We've finally gotten a long spell of dry weather but "our" hay guy just used the window to cut his own second cutting while our "first" (or whatever you'd now call the mess) is still in the field. :cry2: It may just have to be brush hogged. Looks like a lot of goldenrod. We just had that field reseeded last year so am not happy. If he'd just bailed on us (no pun intended) upfront, it would have been better...Kept believing him because everyone says he's a "good guy" and will stand by his word.[/quote]

Sorry to hear. As for a tetter, you could get by without it, if you've got a decent rake. That would help.

I'm wondering just how much good grass may still be in that field, hidden amongst the Goldenrod. You could give it a try, maybe.
Last edited by Workinonit Farm on Thu Sep 28, 2017 5:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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