Stockpiling

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chevytaHOE5674
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby chevytaHOE5674 » Sat Sep 30, 2017 7:30 pm

Three years ago on X-mas day a guy called me needing "a load" of hay real bad. So being the nice guy I am I said come on over the price is XX per bale. Well he shows up and wants two 4x5 bales in the back of his pickup, and since I already told him a price I stuck to it. Ever since I ask how much "a load" is, and then decide to tack on the "tractor starting" charge or not. haha

Bottom line is I try not to sell too much hay. I make hay on shares for customers and they keep their share, I make hay for customers and they pay me per bale and keep all the hay, and I make hay for myself on free and leased ground. I always have some extra to sell but try not to have too much because I HATE selling hay. lol
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby farmerjan » Sat Sep 30, 2017 8:42 pm

We have also had to deal with the multitude of customers that have been talked about here. We have a couple of horse customers that get small square bales. Have had them for years. There is always a check or cash, or if we deliver and they aren't home, they call to ask how much and send the check. 3 are fairly close together so we try to take hay to all 3 when we are going; one gets 100,+/- one can only hold 50 or so and one only gets a small amount like 30 or so. They all know about the other, and if one can't hold as much, usually another can fit in some extra. They are pretty easy to satisfy, one is a little pickier, but it has worked out well over the years. They also are first on the list when the weather is dry/drought like conditions. If they are home they often help unload.

For first time customers, they are told to come see the hay, take a bale home and see if their animals like it. After that, there is no picking through and all that. We will make good on any that have wet or mold in them; keep them and return 'em, and will kick in an extra one or two for their time but we try to keep any "heavy bales" here and feed it out right away.

We don't sell many round bales, but do have one customer that we deliver 2 at a time that is close. He is so happy to not have to go haul it, works irregular hours, and has a tractor with a FEL that can move them the short distance into the field. If he is away with work we will put one in the field when we deliver. He pays good, never complains, calls ahead unless he gets stuck out of town and then still gives us a couple days notice.

We don't do much custom work for too many other people, but do have one that we took over when our friend passed away.... kinda got passed on to us. He has beef cattle, can't make his own hay anymore, but is reasonable and knows the weather situation. He's close to another place we do, so catch it at the same time.
Had one decide to do something different this year after not being happy at how long it took us to get there last year. I'm glad and we don't miss the hay or the aggravation. It was the farthest away place so in my opinion, good riddance. Have since heard he goes through/changes hay makers about every 4-6 years. We had it 4 or 5.... One of those 30+ acre estates that want it to look like a showplace but wants the tax/land use advantage.
Got one real close we are probably going to lose/give up after this year because now they want all of second cutting to help their brother feed his cows. We do all the fertilizer and all the work and used to get all the hay and they got land use tax status, plus we paid a lease on it. Then they wanted about 50 square bales for their horses when they were there on the farm....now its all the second cutting???? Since it has been very dry there isn't much second cutting, we will see haw many bales it makes, but something will have to give. Not doing this for free or to be the "nice guy" deal anymore.

My son said that he is tired of kissing everyone's a$$ and everyone thinking this is owed to them, or that it can't possibly cost much for them to just get some of the hay when that is not in the original agreement. Tired of dealing with them, would rather keep the few good ones and then feed the extra to our cows. Maybe even have a little time to do other things than work 20/7365 between farming and full time jobs. Maybe even get more than 4 or 5 hours sleep some nights????? Have a day off even....
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby boondocks » Sat Sep 30, 2017 10:07 pm

Basically, what I'm hearing is: People, they're the worst. :lol:

Looked at 2 used tedders today. One Kuhn ,one Galfrie, both 4 star, hydraulic. Any opinions on these brands?
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby dun » Sat Sep 30, 2017 11:10 pm

All the complaints about horses adz customers is the reason I enjoy the most having sold my gunshop and quit dealing with the public in a retail situation
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby Jogeephus » Sun Oct 01, 2017 11:04 am

boondocks wrote:Basically, what I'm hearing is: People, they're the worst. :lol:


Doing your own hay is challenging enough due to the uncertainty of the weather but when you add a selfish unsympathetic person to the mix you have the recipe for ulcers. Its easy enough to deal with the weather because you just accept the fact that its out of your hands and you can't control it but people are more stressful because this problem is easy enough to fix with a hammer but there are laws against this.

I don't know the difference in the brands of tedders but I do have an old Kuhn I have as a backup and its over 30 years old I believe. She's an old ugly thing but she works like a charm. IMO, I would look for a brand that I could by the tines locally without ordering. Most of these things are pretty standard but you know how some companies like to make their own unique parts and I wouldn't want that.
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby boondocks » Sun Oct 01, 2017 12:56 pm

Jogeephus wrote:
boondocks wrote:Basically, what I'm hearing is: People, they're the worst. :lol:


Doing your own hay is challenging enough due to the uncertainty of the weather but when you add a selfish unsympathetic person to the mix you have the recipe for ulcers. Its easy enough to deal with the weather because you just accept the fact that its out of your hands and you can't control it but people are more stressful because this problem is easy enough to fix with a hammer but there are laws against this.

I don't know the difference in the brands of tedders but I do have an old Kuhn I have as a backup and its over 30 years old I believe. She's an old ugly thing but she works like a charm. IMO, I would look for a brand that I could by the tines locally without ordering. Most of these things are pretty standard but you know how some companies like to make their own unique parts and I wouldn't want that.


Good to know, thanks. I'm just surprised by what these things are going for. They don't seem that complicated mechanically. The prices for the haybine, tractor, rake, baler etc I could understand but tedders seem disproportionate, around here anyway...
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chevytaHOE5674
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby chevytaHOE5674 » Sun Oct 01, 2017 2:02 pm

It seems tedders are starting to gain popularity so the prices are holding steady or even rising even on old worn out junk. I have an old 2 star deutz fahr that is probably worth more now than when it was new. Having said that I try to use it as little as possible, I'd rather wait an extra day before raking than burn the fuel yanking a tedder around. But sometimes it is necessary so its nice to have.

I also have a Pequea "fluffer" that tosses the windrow up in the air but doesn't scatter it all over the place, and I find myself using this more often than the Deutz tedder. Gets the green stuff to the top and lets wind blow thru the swatch but keeps it rowed up so that I don't drive on any hay pushing it into our usually wet soil. Can also travel faster and there is much less to go wrong with it.
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby Jogeephus » Sun Oct 01, 2017 3:25 pm

boondocks wrote:
Jogeephus wrote:
boondocks wrote:Basically, what I'm hearing is: People, they're the worst. :lol:


Doing your own hay is challenging enough due to the uncertainty of the weather but when you add a selfish unsympathetic person to the mix you have the recipe for ulcers. Its easy enough to deal with the weather because you just accept the fact that its out of your hands and you can't control it but people are more stressful because this problem is easy enough to fix with a hammer but there are laws against this.

I don't know the difference in the brands of tedders but I do have an old Kuhn I have as a backup and its over 30 years old I believe. She's an old ugly thing but she works like a charm. IMO, I would look for a brand that I could by the tines locally without ordering. Most of these things are pretty standard but you know how some companies like to make their own unique parts and I wouldn't want that.


Good to know, thanks. I'm just surprised by what these things are going for. They don't seem that complicated mechanically. The prices for the haybine, tractor, rake, baler etc I could understand but tedders seem disproportionate, around here anyway...


If you lived closer I could fix you with a tedder for a song. Good one to. If you can, be patient and look around and find a used one. Not much can be wrong with one and easy enough fixed if it is. Last one I bought I got from a guy who decided haying wasn't his cup of tea and I got it for a song and it still had paint on the tines. I paid pennies on the dollar for it and he set the price. So if you can, look around and also go to your tractor place and talk to one of the mechanics that work on equipment like this because if you can befriend him he's a wealth of knowledge of who has what and whose looking to sell and whether its been taken care of. That's what I do and the two guys I know are both on my Christmas list because they are so helpful finding stuff like this.
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby boondocks » Mon Oct 02, 2017 1:00 am

Jogeephus wrote:
If you lived closer I could fix you with a tedder for a song. Good one to. If you can, be patient and look around and find a used one. Not much can be wrong with one and easy enough fixed if it is. Last one I bought I got from a guy who decided haying wasn't his cup of tea and I got it for a song and it still had paint on the tines. I paid pennies on the dollar for it and he set the price. So if you can, look around and also go to your tractor place and talk to one of the mechanics that work on equipment like this because if you can befriend him he's a wealth of knowledge of who has what and whose looking to sell and whether its been taken care of. That's what I do and the two guys I know are both on my Christmas list because they are so helpful finding stuff like this.


Thanks, Jo. We are taking our time but there's just not much for sale around here...Maybe I'll make a road trip to Ga when the snow flies and I need some sun! Oughta be about another week :lol:
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby boondocks » Mon Oct 02, 2017 1:07 am

chevytaHOE5674 wrote:It seems tedders are starting to gain popularity so the prices are holding steady or even rising even on old worn out junk. I have an old 2 star deutz fahr that is probably worth more now than when it was new. Having said that I try to use it as little as possible, I'd rather wait an extra day before raking than burn the fuel yanking a tedder around. But sometimes it is necessary so its nice to have.

I also have a Pequea "fluffer" that tosses the windrow up in the air but doesn't scatter it all over the place, and I find myself using this more often than the Deutz tedder. Gets the green stuff to the top and lets wind blow thru the swatch but keeps it rowed up so that I don't drive on any hay pushing it into our usually wet soil. Can also travel faster and there is much less to go wrong with it.

Is this the type you have? http://www.pequea.com/hay-tools/hay-ted ... er-tedders
We've been looking more at ones like this (just as a general example): http://www.hudsonrivertractorcompany.co ... eh=4764031
Any thoughts? thanks!
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chevytaHOE5674
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby chevytaHOE5674 » Mon Oct 02, 2017 2:33 am

I have one of each. Try not to use either but my go to is the pequea fluffer, if that won't do the job I go for the traditional tedder. Trouble here is our clay soil is very wet almost all the time so using the traditional tedder means you have to drive on the hay for raking and that results in a lot of hay getting mashed into wet soil and either getting left behind or raked into the windrow dripping with water and covered in mud.
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby boondocks » Mon Oct 02, 2017 2:35 am

chevytaHOE5674 wrote:I have one of each. Try not to use either but my go to is the pequea fluffer, if that won't do the job I go for the traditional tedder. Trouble here is our clay soil is very wet almost all the time so using the traditional tedder means you have to drive on the hay for raking and that results in a lot of hay getting mashed into wet soil and either getting left behind or raked into the windrow dripping with water and covered in mud.



interesting. Most people around here use the Kuhn-type one. Our soil is less clay--mostly rock!
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chevytaHOE5674
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Re: Stockpiling

Postby chevytaHOE5674 » Mon Oct 02, 2017 6:27 pm

Honestly I would try making hay without a tedder before plunking down big money on another piece of equipment.

For example in June/July/August we had 90" of rainfall, our highest temp for those 3 months was 82* and out lowest HIGH temp was 46* (IE cool and wet summer). I managed to make 300+ 4x5 rolls at 14% or less moisture in 3 separate 3 day windows and never once used the tedder on any of it and many of the fields had standing water in places. Then the 2nd week of September I made another few hundred at 12~14% moisture but that took a 5 day window because of the short days and cool nights. Sure tedder may have cut a day off of the september hay but it also costs a lot of fuel and time to drive around the field when mother nature can do it for free.

There are times a tedder is invaluable, but for a small time producer like yourself it shouldn't be too hard to time your small acreage with mother nature. You can rake a lot of hay twice for what a tedder costs.

As for not much to go wrong with a tedder, the frames take a beating, so do the gearboxes. I know where at least two tedders are sitting with shelled gearboxes that cost more to repair than the cost of a replacement machine.
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