Page 2 of 3

Re: Pain in the A$$ pair

Posted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:25 pm
by TCRanch
I just sold a very nice bred almost 3 year old cow, private treaty, because while she raised a very nice calf she was just too skittish and I was always on guard with her. Full disclosure to the buyer. Both calves she raised were heifers and I didn't keep the 1st one, probably won't keep the 2nd I weaned in Oct - just makes me leery of how she may turn out. That said, I had a purebred bull that was dangerously aggressive & sold him after only having him one year. And I kept one of the heifers he sired that to this day is just the sweetest thing. I'm big on EPD docility for my bulls but it seems the maternal docility traits are more dominant. THAT said, I also had a calf named Nacho (not-'cho-mama!) because it was the polar opposite of its high-strung dam (buh-bye!). Bottom line: life is too short to deal with PITA cows/calves and you can't gauge docility or other admirable traits based solely on EPD's or lineage, it's a case-by-case and when in doubt, sell 'em.

Re: Pain in the A$$ pair

Posted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:50 pm
by Workinonit Farm
I had a cow like that, a number of years ago. She always raised one of the nicest calves each year. But after a while, I didn't care how great her calves were, they weren't nearly enough to offset her PITA factor. She'd run off with all the calves, like yours. I didn't have time to keep fooling with that BS.

Sell her!!!

Re: Pain in the A$$ pair

Posted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 9:30 am
by SchenkAngusFarm
I'd take her to the sale barn. Problems cows are problem cows. The problems will only get worse and I don't think anyone will want her for their farm imo.

Re: Pain in the A$$ pair

Posted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 12:09 pm
by BRYANT
SchenkAngusFarm wrote:I'd take her to the sale barn. Problems cows are problem cows. The problems will only get worse and I don't think anyone will want her for their farm imo.

I might would if she is cheap enough and can wean a big calf with low maintenance. Turn her in a place with good corral and forget about her, mess with her once or twice a year.

Re: Pain in the A$$ pair

Posted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 12:56 pm
by greybeard
Them's the kind you want to shoot or die on their own and consider yourself better off for it.
Wheels!!

Re: Pain in the A$$ pair

Posted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 8:36 am
by Brute 23
Im all about cows protecting their calves and even being a little ornery about their space... but dragging other cattle from the pens is a no-no. She would have be sold around here.

Re: Pain in the A$$ pair

Posted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 12:43 pm
by Texas Gal
I'll sell one quicker for that kind of behavior than anything else. I don't have the time or the inclination to deal those kind of cows.

Re: Pain in the A$$ pair

Posted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 2:38 pm
by SchenkAngusFarm
BRYANT wrote:
SchenkAngusFarm wrote:I'd take her to the sale barn. Problems cows are problem cows. The problems will only get worse and I don't think anyone will want her for their farm imo.

I might would if she is cheap enough and can wean a big calf with low maintenance. Turn her in a place with good corral and forget about her, mess with her once or twice a year.


I hear you. Everyone is different. I guess I just don't have patience for attitudes. I like them to be good mommas but not to the point where it's a problem.

I remember I got rid of my favorite herd sire ever out of Freightliner when he started acting up. I could pet him and then one day he went nuts and broke a gate and some pen fencing. Got rid of him the next day.

Re: Pain in the A$$ pair

Posted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 4:55 pm
by dun
We had a cow like that which wouldn;t come up to be worked. Got tired of messing with her. Sadly she raised 1 bull we kept as a herd sire and 1 we sold to a neighbor as a herd sire. The bulls were never an issue cause wherever their girls went they went.

Re: Pain in the A$$ pair

Posted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 4:33 pm
by Muddy
Got few cows are like that.....sold them and my life just got MUCH easier. Smooth work and fast work with the cattle I ever had in the two last years.

Re: Pain in the A$$ pair

Posted: Sun Nov 12, 2017 9:43 pm
by BK9954
I gotta cow kinda like that from the auction, she has warmed a little but her calf never has. He still stays out in the pasture when they come in to feed. She was scared of my ATV for a while, not anymore. But her calf has been trained to be scared of it. Anytime it hears me coming, it bolts for the brush. She will be gone when she breeds back.

Re: Pain in the A$$ pair

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:32 am
by SchenkAngusFarm
I've got one yesterday that I'm now having attitude problems with. She's a great cow phenotypically but she won't go in the chute anymore and she can fit.

I'm going to send her out. Can't deal with it.

Re: Pain in the A$$ pair

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:48 am
by BRYANT
SchenkAngusFarm wrote:I've got one yesterday that I'm now having attitude problems with. She's a great cow phenotypically but she won't go in the chute anymore and she can fit.

I'm going to send her out. Can't deal with it.

Just takes a little elec. on her back side and she will go in the shoot.

Re: Pain in the A$$ pair

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:00 am
by Craig Miller
BRYANT wrote:
SchenkAngusFarm wrote:I've got one yesterday that I'm now having attitude problems with. She's a great cow phenotypically but she won't go in the chute anymore and she can fit.

I'm going to send her out. Can't deal with it.

Just takes a little elec. on her back side and she will go in the shoot.


Or straight up and over the top.

I'm kinda surprised at how many people say ship her.

Re: Pain in the A$$ pair

Posted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:09 am
by SchenkAngusFarm
BRYANT wrote:
SchenkAngusFarm wrote:I've got one yesterday that I'm now having attitude problems with. She's a great cow phenotypically but she won't go in the chute anymore and she can fit.

I'm going to send her out. Can't deal with it.

Just takes a little elec. on her back side and she will go in the shoot.


She got a good amount of electric in her backside and she wouldn't go. I ultimately had to back her out. She was not moving.