Major birthing trouble

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SchenkAngusFarm
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Re: Major birthing trouble

Postby SchenkAngusFarm » Thu Jan 04, 2018 9:39 am

The reality is some cows just die even if you work your hardest to save them. Animals die just like people.

The best cattlemen I know lost several this past year to pneumonia. You can be the best cattleman in the world and sometimes it happens. It can come from a million different angles and reasons.

I've been a cattlemen a lot longer than I've been on this board but I hope this place remains a place to help people. I think we all want the best for each others herds and animals.
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Kell-inKY
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Re: Major birthing trouble

Postby Kell-inKY » Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:11 am

No, I wasn't run off (though I rarely visit this site anymore).
Yes, those were hard words to hear, but I'm a big boy and am not above taking advice, that's why I posted on here.
Yes, I jumped the gun and put her down, the vet said she may have been saveable, I regret that and it still bothers me on several levels. I think I needed a little hindsight before posting a response, that's why I deleted my post, it wasn't anything bad by any means, just felt awful even commenting on it. I hate screwing up.

Lastly, in no way did I leave her out there for a day knowing she was in trouble.
I noticed on New Years Eve she had started calving, she was older and I had never had any trouble from any of my heifers, let alone a cow so we left and went to a friends family party and stayed well past midnight. When I saw her the next morning she was suffering pretty bad, bleeding out of a rectal prolapse I think it's called, which were delivered, but calf was not. This was not something I expected (no legs hanging out, no partially delivered calf I could pull on) and I waited for advice as long as I could but not long enough obviously. I will be prepared next time for trouble. This was a pretty old cow which I had trouble with from the get go, very cagey, very hard to load, hard to get in the chute, should have never bought her but that's another story. A hard lesson, but a lesson learned all the way around.

Thanks to all who tried to help.
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True Grit Farms
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Re: Major birthing trouble

Postby True Grit Farms » Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:22 am

You've already learned a lot, and passed some information to the next person.
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Bright Raven
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Re: Major birthing trouble

Postby Bright Raven » Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:33 am

Kell-inKY wrote:No, I wasn't run off (though I rarely visit this site anymore).
Yes, those were hard words to hear, but I'm a big boy and am not above taking advice, that's why I posted on here.
Yes, I jumped the gun and put her down, the vet said she may have been saveable, I regret that and it still bothers me on several levels. I think I needed a little hindsight before posting a response, that's why I deleted my post, it wasn't anything bad by any means, just felt awful even commenting on it. I hate screwing up.

Lastly, in no way did I leave her out there for a day knowing she was in trouble.
I noticed on New Years Eve she had started calving, she was older and I had never had any trouble from any of my heifers, let alone a cow so we left and went to a friends family party and stayed well past midnight. When I saw her the next morning she was suffering pretty bad, bleeding out of a rectal prolapse I think it's called, which were delivered, but calf was not. This was not something I expected (no legs hanging out, no partially delivered calf I could pull on) and I waited for advice as long as I could but not long enough obviously. I will be prepared next time for trouble. This was a pretty old cow which I had trouble with from the get go, very cagey, very hard to load, hard to get in the chute, should have never bought her but that's another story. A hard lesson, but a lesson learned all the way around.

Thanks to all who tried to help.


When someone figures out how to get through life with ZERO errors, I hope they don't charge too much money for the secret.
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dun
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Re: Major birthing trouble

Postby dun » Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:51 am

When you need a vet and don;t have any expectations of getting one and you've exhausted your abilities and resources, if the animal is suffering putting her down would be the right option.
We've all been in that boat, at least a lot of us have. And there is always regrets because of the "if onlys".
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Re: Major birthing trouble

Postby Ky hills » Thu Jan 04, 2018 11:26 am

Kell-inKY wrote:No, I wasn't run off (though I rarely visit this site anymore).
Yes, those were hard words to hear, but I'm a big boy and am not above taking advice, that's why I posted on here.
Yes, I jumped the gun and put her down, the vet said she may have been saveable, I regret that and it still bothers me on several levels. I think I needed a little hindsight before posting a response, that's why I deleted my post, it wasn't anything bad by any means, just felt awful even commenting on it. I hate screwing up.

Lastly, in no way did I leave her out there for a day knowing she was in trouble.
I noticed on New Years Eve she had started calving, she was older and I had never had any trouble from any of my heifers, let alone a cow so we left and went to a friends family party and stayed well past midnight. When I saw her the next morning she was suffering pretty bad, bleeding out of a rectal prolapse I think it's called, which were delivered, but calf was not. This was not something I expected (no legs hanging out, no partially delivered calf I could pull on) and I waited for advice as long as I could but not long enough obviously. I will be prepared next time for trouble. This was a pretty old cow which I had trouble with from the get go, very cagey, very hard to load, hard to get in the chute, should have never bought her but that's another story. A hard lesson, but a lesson learned all the way around.

Thanks to all who tried to help.


Glad that you are still posting on here. I would venture to say most of us have had cattle situations similar to that where we second guess what we did, I know I have been there. The way I see it if we can learn from an experience, then it's not a complete loss, and may prove valuable for the future.
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Bigfoot
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Re: Major birthing trouble

Postby Bigfoot » Thu Jan 04, 2018 1:04 pm

I guess about everything I know in life, was from trial and error.
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Re: Major birthing trouble

Postby SchenkAngusFarm » Thu Jan 04, 2018 1:59 pm

Ky hills wrote:
Kell-inKY wrote:No, I wasn't run off (though I rarely visit this site anymore).
Yes, those were hard words to hear, but I'm a big boy and am not above taking advice, that's why I posted on here.
Yes, I jumped the gun and put her down, the vet said she may have been saveable, I regret that and it still bothers me on several levels. I think I needed a little hindsight before posting a response, that's why I deleted my post, it wasn't anything bad by any means, just felt awful even commenting on it. I hate screwing up.

Lastly, in no way did I leave her out there for a day knowing she was in trouble.
I noticed on New Years Eve she had started calving, she was older and I had never had any trouble from any of my heifers, let alone a cow so we left and went to a friends family party and stayed well past midnight. When I saw her the next morning she was suffering pretty bad, bleeding out of a rectal prolapse I think it's called, which were delivered, but calf was not. This was not something I expected (no legs hanging out, no partially delivered calf I could pull on) and I waited for advice as long as I could but not long enough obviously. I will be prepared next time for trouble. This was a pretty old cow which I had trouble with from the get go, very cagey, very hard to load, hard to get in the chute, should have never bought her but that's another story. A hard lesson, but a lesson learned all the way around.

Thanks to all who tried to help.


Glad that you are still posting on here. I would venture to say most of us have had cattle situations similar to that where we second guess what we did, I know I have been there. The way I see it if we can learn from an experience, then it's not a complete loss, and may prove valuable for the future.


It's a great point Ky Hills. If you haven't had a regret at some point you probably haven't worked with cattle much or you're just the luckiest person on earth.
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Re: Major birthing trouble

Postby Workinonit Farm » Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:08 pm

Lord knows I've made my fair share of mistakes, lived through a few regrets, learned from some bad experiences. That's life.
Any of us who have dealt with livestock, or animals in general, long enough, we will have some negative experiences.

Sorry that you lost the cow, but you gained experience and more knowledge so it wasn't a total loss.

As for "harsh" remarks, I haven't seen any yet, on this thread. If they are there, then I missed them. All I've read is people talking about reality. If any of that is considered harsh, good thing they don't live in my area, because that's just normal conversation, and 1 of the "biggest" cow vets in our area sure doesn't sugar-coat anything and he has no hesitation letting people know what he thinks, and yes, I have found him to be a bit arrogant at times but he knows his stuff and I'd rather have knowledge & experience than good bedside manner, but then again, I think I may be considered "old school" and "politically incorrect" anyhow.
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Bright Raven
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Re: Major birthing trouble

Postby Bright Raven » Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:16 pm

Workinonit Farm wrote: 1 of the "biggest" cow vets in our area sure doesn't sugar-coat anything and he has no hesitation letting people know what he thinks, and yes, I have found him to be a bit arrogant at times but he knows his stuff and I'd rather have knowledge & experience than good bedside manner.


My vet uses the same approach. Some of the stories he tells is unbelievable.
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Re: Major birthing trouble

Postby wbvs58 » Thu Jan 04, 2018 5:21 pm

dun wrote:When you need a vet and don;t have any expectations of getting one and you've exhausted your abilities and resources, if the animal is suffering putting her down would be the right option.
We've all been in that boat, at least a lot of us have. And there is always regrets because of the "if onlys".


Well said Dun.

Ken
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Re: Major birthing trouble

Postby angus9259 » Thu Jan 04, 2018 7:14 pm

wbvs58 wrote:
dun wrote:When you need a vet and don;t have any expectations of getting one and you've exhausted your abilities and resources, if the animal is suffering putting her down would be the right option.
We've all been in that boat, at least a lot of us have. And there is always regrets because of the "if onlys".


Well said Dun.

Ken


Yup. Shot one myself that was in milk fever. Could have saved her but didn't know what milk fever was and vet couldn't come out. Learned the next day from the dairyman that I probably could have saved her. Also pulled a calf whose head was flopping backwards. I thought it was twins and one was coming backwards. Snapped the calfs neck. Sure wish all my learning was over but I"m sure it's not.
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Re: Major birthing trouble

Postby Midtenn » Thu Jan 04, 2018 9:10 pm

Everyone on here has made bad decisions or failed to do anything when we should have. Most of us wouldn't have worried about that older cow having trouble. Sometimes it's just blind luck or the Good Lord that makes it work. I had an 8 year old about 2 weeks ago I knew was about to calve, missed her one day and said well she's hiding out having it....missed her the next day and something just told me to go look for her. Took me 2 hours to find her in thick briars and vines....2 back feet sticking out. Took me about 3 more hours to get her out of the thick stuff and get her caught. Managed to save the calf and they both are doing fine. But it's a miracle I even looked for her. Heifers are another thing, but Most times I wouldn't have worried at all about an 8 year old MIA for a couple days. Sometimes it's just blind luck
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