Epd's breakdown

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Chocolate Cow2
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Re: Epd's breakdown

Postby Chocolate Cow2 » Wed Mar 21, 2018 2:36 pm

Ebenezer wrote:
kilroy60 wrote:DD is not a problem if you're only running commercial cows. The chances of a development issue is very rare. We've got a bull that is DDC and have many calfs and never a problem. We also have one cow that is also DDC and she's thrown good calves over the years with no problems. The problem comes in if you're running registered cattle. Most people who run all registered cattle do not want any cattle with any DD potential mainly due to resale value of calves.

Not quite there. If you have used Angus bulls fora number of years you could have been buying carriers before it was told and promoted. The problem would be if you retain your own heifers or buy replacements from someone who might have also used a carrier or two.

Not a thing to do with registered or commercial differences. You have been fortunate that you did not get a DDC earlier in the program.


Totally correct AND-as I believe I said earlier-a devastating situation for a commercial herd because one of the traits of Developmental Defect is early to mid-term abortion of the defective calf.
With simple recessive genetic conditions (DD, AM, NH, CA, OS, etc.), an animal must carry two copies of the defective gene in order to show the condition. Mating a carrier to a free animal would result in half of the progeny being carriers and all the progeny would appear normal. Mating two carrier animals will result in 25% affected calves, 50% normal phenotype but carriers of the defective gene, and 25% free of the genetic defect. With non-lethal homozygotes as is the case with DD and CA, the potential exists to breed homozygous recessive animals. Breeding affected animals will quickly increase the frequency of the defective allele as every progeny will inherit the broken gene. Breeding strategies should attempt to increase the frequency of desirable alleles while decreasing the frequency of the defective alleles.

You can use this bull BUT be aware of the fact you have willingly bred this defect into your herd and from now on you will have to be very knowledgeable of future sires choices.

If you do not keep any offspring of this bull---'ya got no worries. His first calf crop will tell you if any previous sires were DDC.
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Son of Butch
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Re: Epd's breakdown

Postby Son of Butch » Thu Mar 29, 2018 3:50 am

Full term DD calves are very rare.
#1 problem with dd is embryonic death, natures way of dealing with undesirables and most often goes unnoticed.
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Ebenezer
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Re: Epd's breakdown

Postby Ebenezer » Thu Mar 29, 2018 7:45 am

Son of Butch wrote:Full term DD calves are very rare.
#1 problem with dd is embryonic death, natures way of dealing with undesirables and most often goes unnoticed.

Doesn't solve economic losses to anyone who has them. That is the bottom line.
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BobbyLummus1
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Re: Epd's breakdown

Postby BobbyLummus1 » Thu Mar 29, 2018 7:29 pm

thanks Ive learned here . I have never kept a heifer, all commercial cows , all calves sell, my herds consist of put together sale barn cows .i put the young bramer out there with him too . Hopefully the two young bulls with get 30 2nd stage cows bred when the time comes in this pasture
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